WorldCat Identities

Kahne, Joseph

Overview
Works: 28 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 734 library holdings
Genres: Abstracts  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Joseph Kahne
Reframing educational policy : democracy, community, and the individual by Joseph Kahne( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 422 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The civic potential of video games by Joseph Kahne( Book )

11 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report focuses on the civic aspects of video game play among youth. According to a 2006 survey, 58 percent of young people aged 15 to 25 were civically "disengaged," meaning that they participated in fewer than two types of either electoral activities (defined as voting, campaigning, etc.) or civic activities (for example, volunteering). Kahne and his coauthors are interested in what role video games may or may not play in this disengagement. Until now, most research in the field has considered how video games relate to children's aggression and to academic learning. Digital media scholars suggest, however, that other social outcomes also deserve attention. For example, as games become more social, some scholars argue that they can be important spheres in which to foster civic development. Others disagree, suggesting that games, along with other forms of Internet involvement, may in fact take time away from civic and political engagement. Drawing on data from the 2006 survey, the authors examine the relationship between video game play and civic development. They call for further research on teen gaming experiences so that we can understand and promote civic engagement through video games."--Publisher's description
Restructuring : where are we and where are we going by Joseph Kahne( Book )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two distinct "waves" characterized the efforts to change public schools in the 1980s. The first wave called for increased academic standards (increased graduation requirements, longer school days, and strict accountability standards), but neglected educational practice and the roles that parents, teachers, administrators, and community members played in education. The second wave of reform attempted to compensate for this by focusing on the school as a whole as the important unit of change. This document examines this restructuring movement against the historical background from which it has emerged. It also describes examples of federal, state, school, and district restructuring and suggests that these proposed changes will require teachers, site-based administrators, and individuals in district and state offices to assume significantly different roles and responsibilities. This evolution of the restructuring movement suggests new concerns. Political, fiscal, and organizational barriers may cause problems for future restructuring. Decisions regarding the extent and nature of restructuring should be made considering the goals of particular schools and districts, their available resources, and their organizational and political context. (40 references) (lap)
Participatory politics new media and youth political action by Cathy J Cohen( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To rigorously consider the impact of new media on the political and civic behavior of young people, The MacArthur Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP) developed and fielded one of the first nationally representative studies of new media and politics among young people
Small high schools on a larger scale : the first three years of the Chicago high school redesign initiative by Joseph Kahne( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Increasingly, researchers, policymakers, school leaders, and concerned citizens are recognizing that high schools in the United States are in need of major reform. Current research shows that high schools are not preparing students for college, work, or life, and that they are leading to increased alienation among students. In a much-noted speech to the National Governors Association, Bill Gates described high schools as obsolete. He continued, "By obsolete, I don't just mean that our high schools are broken, flawed, and under-funded, although a case could be made for every one of those points. By obsolete, I mean that our high schools, even when they are working exactly as designed, cannot teach our kids what they need to know today." Analysis by Greene and Winters indicates that the national graduation rate for the class of 2002 was 71 percent for public school students, and that only 34 percent of students who entered ninth grade in public schools left school with both a regular diploma and the qualifications to attend a four-year college. The problem is especially severe in large urban high schools, which disproportionately serve students of low socioeconomic status and students of color: of students enrolled as ninth-graders and scheduled to graduate in 2002, only 52 percent of Latino and 56 percent of African-American students ultimately earned a regular diploma. The likelihood of graduating with the abilities and qualifications to even apply to a four-year institution is 40 percent for white students, 23 percent for African-American students, and 20 percent for Latino students. Chicago's public schools reflect these trends. Only 54 percent of the 2000-2001 freshman class graduated in four years. In addition, eleventh-graders in Illinois scored higher than eleventh-graders in Chicago on the 2004 Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). Roderick, Nagaoka, and Allensworth found that only 6.5 percent of 13-year-olds in Chicago's public high schools in 1998 or 1999had graduated from high school within six years, and only about 3 percent of male African-American and Latino students did so. Spurred by such statistics, some educational reformers have proposed that the creation of small schools provides a possible response to impersonal, incoherent, and ineffective "shopping mall" high schools, reversing a 50-year trend based on arguments that small rural schools are less effective than larger comprehensive high schools that can provide students with greater opportunities through an appropriately differentiated curriculum. Reform focused on smaller, more personal schools has been spurred by educators, researchers, and by foundation funding. Energized by these efforts, the city of Chicago and numerous other urban districts are emphasizing the creation of small schools as a key part of their high school improvement strategies. The document includes four appendixes: (A) Description of the Sample; (B) Rasch Analysis; (C) Description of Hierarchical Linear Models for Teacher and Student Survey Measures and Student Outcomes; and (D) Description of Teacher and Student Survey Measures. [This report was written with John Q. Easton. Commentaries are provided by Joseph McDonald and Henry May.]
Education for action : preparing youth for participatory democracy by Joel Westheimer( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this article, we consider what it might mean to move preparation for membership in a participatory democracy to the center of a school's educational agenda. We frame our analysis of education for participatory democracy - that is, education that fosters youth's ability to work collectively toward a better society - by reviewing relevant historical efforts to accomplish this goal. We then examine the curriculum and program ofa contemporary school designed to promote participatory democracy - a schoolunabashed in its commitment to fostering the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required to engage and act on important social issues. We detail twofeatures of this school's curriculum: its use of experience-based projects and its emphasis on social studies. We also examine two challenges faced by this school and by others, we expect. Specifically, we consider efforts to support the development of participatory citizens while simultaneously focusing on the development of academic skills. Finally, we examine a tension between education and indoctrination that was noted by several teachers
Building Community A Model for Teacher Education and Staff Development by Joseph Kahne( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper calls for the use of experience-based teacher education and staff development to foster strong school communities. The authors discuss an evaluation of the Experiential Curricula Project at Stanford University, an innovative course sequence for prospective teachers. They focus in particular on the program's ability to foster community both among students and among students and teachers in an urban multi-cultural setting. They examine current reform strategies intended to promote teacher and school community including site-based management, magnet programs, school-within-a-school programs and restructuring and argue that these reforms meet with limited success in creating strong community in schools because of three obstacles: (1) organizational efforts do not provide teachers with experiences on which to draw, (2) organizational efforts do not provide teachers with the pedagogical techniques or the curricular orientation necessary to effectively foster and sustain community in schools, and (3) organizational efforts commonly emphasize the instrumental rather than the intrinsic value of community. The paper highlights the potential contribution experience-based teacher training and staff development can make to the creation of more supportive and inclusive learning environments for students as well as teachers. (Author)
Social justice, service learning, and higher education : a critical review of research by Joseph Kahne( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pričujoči prispevek pojasnjuje potrebo po raziskovanju, ki bi poglobilo naše razumevanje odnosa med učenjem s služenjem skupnosti, državljansko vzgojo in pravičnostjo na visokih šolah ter univerzah. Obravnava posveča posebno pozornost potrebi po razumevanju različnih pristopov k učenju s služenjem skupnosti ter različnih konceptov "dobrega" državljana, na primer odgovorni državljan, sodelujoči državljan in pravični državljan. Velika večina obsenih pobud za izobraževanje s služenjem skupnosti poudarja prostovoljno delo in dobrodelnost, vendar pa ne zagotavljajo pouka o družbenih gibanjih, analizah držubenih in ekonomskih struktur ter sistemski spremembi. Zaradi tega se je raziskovanje osredotočilo na koncept državljanstva, ki daje prednost posameznim dejanjem sočutja in prijaznosti pred družbeno akcijo ter iskanjem socialne pravičnosti
What Kind of Citizen? The Politics of Educating for Democracy by Joel Westheimer( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The notion of democracy occupies a privileged place in our society. Educators and policymakers are increasingly pursuing a variety of programs to promote democracy through civic education, service learning, and other pedagogies. The nature of their underlying beliefs, however, differs. This article underscores the political implications of education for democracy and suggests that the narrow and often ideologically conservative conception of citizenship embedded in many current efforts at teaching for democracy reflects not arbitrary choices but rather political choices with political consequences. Three conceptions of the "good" citizen are treated in this article: personally responsible, participatory, and justice oriented. They emerged from an analysis of both democratic theory and a 2-year study of educational programs aiming to promote democracy. Drawing on quantitative and qualitative data from two of the programs studied, it is argued that these conceptions embody significantly different beliefs regarding the capacities and commitments citizens need for democracy to flourish, and they carry significantly different implications for pedagogy, curriculum, evaluation, and educational policy. The authors conclude that politics and the interests of varied groups are often deeply embedded in the ways efforts to educate for democracy are conceptualized, implemented, and studied. (Contains 34 references and 3 tables.) (RT)
Chicago High School Redesign Initiative A Snapshot of the First Year of Implementation by Susan E Sporte( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In fall 2002, three large traditional high schools in Chicago, Illinois, started a conversion process that opened five new small schools. In partnership with Mills College, the Consortium on Chicago School Research designed a short-term, interview-based study to provide a snapshot of these new small schools in their first year of planning and implementation. Principals or directors were interviewed at the five small schools, and principals were interviewed in the three host schools. Three program staff members and 50% of the teachers were interviewed, and focus groups were held with groups of 5 to 10 students. Question and answer sessions were held with parents at two small schools. Findings show that the level of student-teacher personalism increased, and teacher professional community was strengthened in at least four of the small schools. Small school staff members reported that the focus on instruction was limited in year one, and participants reported implementation challenges. The current and future relationships between small schools and the host school were not clearly defined, but overall there was a sense of optimism and commitment for the next year. (SLD)
Effective School-Linked Services Programs Valuable Lessons from Past Collaborative Reform by Carolyn Kelley( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After approximately 20 years of developing collaborative delivery systems for children with disabilities, educational researchers have developed an extensive knowledge base. In an effort to identify potential strategies for developing and institutionalizing school-linked coordinated service delivery systems for at-risk youth, this paper examines collaboration under the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Research findings in the following areas are presented: funding, parent involvement, and accountability. School-linked social welfare services have successfully used funding strategies that attracted new revenue and redirected existing categorical funds toward coordinated service delivery. Strategies that have increased parent involvement are based on direct, informal, and personal forms of communication, such as the development of volunteer programs, home visits, and parent group meetings. Finally, holistic accountability structures have been used effectively to develop individual outcome goals and to process accountability. Contains 50 references. (LMI)
In the Service of What? The Politics of Service Learning by Joel Westheimer( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With the current interest and allocation of resources accorded service learning comes a growing need to clarify the varied ideological perspectives on school and society that underline service learning activities and programs. Drawing on an evaluation of Stanford's Service Learning 2000 project and on a rhetorical analysis of policy talk on service learning, this paper proposes a conceptual scheme that highlights these complexities. It seeks to clarify the ideological, political, and social goals and assumptions embedded in the policy and practice of service learning. Two examples of service learning projects funded in part by the Stanford Service Learning 2000 minigrants program are highlighted. Data were obtained from interviews with and surveys of teachers and students, classroom observations, and project reports submitted by the teachers. The first project stressed charity and the cultivation of civic duty and altruism among the students. The second project focused on transformative education, using systemic and critical analysis to bring about social change. Findings distinguish among the moral, political, and pedagogical goals that motivate supporters of service learning--the moral domain, the political domain, and the pedagogical domain. Although charity is an admirable goal, educators must ask the questions "who and for what?" By focusing on charity rather than change, by emphasizing noncontroversial issues, and by framing controversial issues in noncontroversial ways, educators forego many opportunities for meaningful, reflective analysis and transformative experiences. By linking social analysis and action, service learning frameworks can facilitate powerful educational experiences. (LMI)
Educating the "Good" Citizen The Politics of School-Based Civic Education Programs by Joel Westheimer( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Educators and policymakers are increasingly pursuing a broad variety of programs that aim to promote democracy through civic education, service learning, and other pedagogies. Their underlying beliefs, however, differ. For some, a commitment to democracy is associated with liberal notions of freedom, while for others democracy is primarily about equality of opportunity. For some, civil society is the key, while others place their hope for social change in healthy free markets. For some, good citizens in a democracy volunteer, while for others they take active parts in political processes by voting. This paper calls attention to the spectrum of ideas about what good citizenship is and what good citizens do. The paper underscores the political implications of education for democracy and suggests that the narrow and often ideologically conservative conception of citizenship embedded in many current efforts at teaching for democracy reflects not arbitrary choices, but rather political choices with political consequences. It details three conceptions of the good citizen: (1) personally responsible, (2) participatory, and (3) justice oriented. States that these emerged from analysis of both democratic theory and a two year study of 10 educational programs aiming to promote democracy. Drawing on quantitative and qualitative data from the two programs studied, the paper argues that these three conceptions embody significantly different beliefs regarding what citizens need for democracy to flourish. They carry significantly different implications for pedagogy, curriculum, evaluation, and educational policy. Politics and interests of varied groups are often deeply embedded in the ways people conceptualize, implement, and study efforts to educate for democracy. Includes seven notes and four tables. Contains 64 references. (BT)
The Limits of Efficacy Educating Citizens for a Democratic Society by Joseph Kahne( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A growing number of educational programs seek to promote young people's participation in political and civic affairs. A common strategy for doing so is to provide students with opportunities to make a difference in their communities. Much research demonstrates a strong connection between a person's sense about making a difference efficacy and the level of participation. Ten nationally recognized programs that engaged students in community-based experiences and aimed to develop students' civic and political commitments were studied for over two years. By drawing on observations, interviews, and pre/post surveys that focused on changes in attitudes related to civic participation, the study was able to contextualize students' sense of efficacy as civic actors and its relation to program goals. This paper explores two common assumptions about developing a sense of civic and political efficacy: (1) when students' sense of efficacy grows, their commitment to future civic involvement grows as well; and (2) conversely, when students become frustrated or come to believe that problems are intractable, their commitment appears to decline (data supported these suppositions). Evidence presented indicated that complex questions surround the desirability of structuring curriculum to promote students' sense of their political and civic efficacy. The findings indicate that opportunities for civic and political efficacy can support the development of stronger commitments; but opportunities for students to learn about and experience the barriers and constraints they and other civic actors face are also important. The paper suggests ways programs might navigate dilemmas faced by practitioners who seek to structure experiences so students can gain a sense of efficacy on one hand, and an understanding of serious obstacles to democratic social change on the other. (Contains 8 notes, 3 tables, and 28 references.) (Author/BT)
Wide Awake to the World: The Arts and Urban Schools Conflicts and Contributions of an After-School Program by Therese Quinn( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While the benefits of arts involvement are increasingly clear, policies and practices consistent with this recognition are not proceeding apace. Nearly half of the schools in the United States have no full-time arts teachers, and emphases on standards and standardized testing have eliminated the arts in many urban schools. This case study of a multi-year, after-school program in urban public schools explores challenges and tensions that emerged during the program's implementation. Focusing on understanding the place and purpose of an arts program in a specific community, researchers employed a grounded theory approach and used multiple data-gathering methods, ranging from observations and interviews to surveys. They found that in serving hundreds of students, employing dozens of staff, and aiming to meet several complex goals, this arts program faced technical challenges that undermined its effectiveness. The arts program also suffered from unaddressed conflicts regarding norms and values. Artists attempted to provide students opportunities for creative exploration, while school staff emphasized control, order, and academic goals. The paper discusses these tensions and the ways they undermined the arts program. (Contains 43 references.) (Author/SM)
Notes from the ground : teachers, principals, and students' perspectives on the Chicago high school redesign initiative, year two by Susan E Sporte( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In spring 2003, the Consortium on Chicago School Research, in partnership with Mills College, undertook a short-term, interview-based study of five small schools created under the guidance of the Chicago High School Redesign Imitative (CHSRI) in Chicago Public Schools (CPS). This research resulted in a descriptive data brief, "Chicago High School Redesign Initiative: A Snapshot of the First Year of Implementation," released in August 2003. In spring 2004, the same researchers followed up that earlier data brief by interviewing students, teachers, and principals at 11 small schools--five schools from the spring 2003 study and six schools that were opened in fall 2003, which included two contract schools. These interview data allowed the researchers to provide a snapshot of the schools' implementation experiences, to explore whether the issues that the second wave of schools faced were the same as those confronted a year earlier by their sister schools, to learn about new issues faced by the first wave of schools, and to highlight emerging questions. As the researchers did in 2003, they categorized the interview data that they collected in the second year of CHSRI into important themes. These emerging themes and findings are intended to stimulate discussion among stakeholders and focus attention on critical areas for action. In addition, this study was designed to be a springboard for a systematic, three-year qualitative study that begins in the fall of 2004. This report summarizes the composite experience of participants in 11 CHSRI-supported small high schools. These experiences provide a powerful description of what is happening in the schools as seen through the eyes of the most directly involved. Careful attention to their reports can make planning for future new small high schools more relevant and productive. Appended are: (1) Theory of Action; and (2) Additional Demographic and Test-Score Data
Democratic Educational Practices and the Constraining Culture of Mainstream Policy Analysis by Joseph Kahne( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Despite Dewey's influence on educational thought, those with progressive visions of democratic education are generally on the margins of educational policy and practice. One notable exception was the "Eight-Year Study," a landmark attempt to design, implement, and evaluate democratic secondary schools. The Eight-Year Study was begun in 1930 by the Progressive Education Association (pea) and the Commission on the Relation of School and College. It studied alternative programs in two school districts (Denver and Tulsa), 26 other schools, and 300 colleges and universities. A total of 1,475 students in alternative programs were matched with nonparticipants and interviewed over the next 8 years. Although the Eight-Year Study was important, it failed to bring progressive educational practices to U.S. high schools. Examination of this effort permits consideration of how democratic priorities can transform both educational practice and policy analysis. Specifically, this study demonstrates the norms, values, and technologies that guide mainstream analysis are poorly suited to record and report the strengths of the democratic orientation inspired by Dewey's work. (Lmi)
A Pedagogy of Collective action and Reflection : Preparing Teachers for Collective School Leadership by Joseph Kahne( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reframing Educational Policy: Democracy, Community, and the Individual. Advances in Contemporary Educational Thought, Volume 16 by Joseph Kahne( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Rather than defining and debating particular goals, educational policymakers tend to focus on the technical issues surrounding educational practice. This book considers the social and ethical orientations that structure mainstream policy dialogues and the way in which adoption of some alternative social and ethical principles would change the form and focus of political debates. Chapters 2 through 4 describe four political and ethical approaches toward policymaking, policy analysis, and policy implementation: the utilitarian, the rights-based, the communitarian, and the humanist. These perspectives are used to examine the connections between educational and societal goals. The fifth and sixth chapters examine two contemporary policy issues, tracking and school choice, through the lens of each framework. A conclusion is that mainstream dialogue is shaped primarily by a utilitarian and rights focus on human capital development. Chapter 7 discusses the longitudinal research conducted in the 1930s and early 1940s by the Progressive Education Association's Commission on the Relation of School and College, the Eight-Year Study of 30 schools pursuing democratic communitarian and humanistic goals. The final chapter argues that two alternative frameworks--democratic communitarianism and humanistic psychology--can provide a wider and perhaps more desirable vision of the purpose of education. An index is included and an appendix summarizes the four perspectives. (Contains 239 references.) (Lmi)
Neglecting alternatives : an assessment of the status and implications of varied social theories in educational policy rhetoric by Joseph Kahne( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Reframing educational policy : democracy, community, and the individual
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The civic potential of video games
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English (38)