WorldCat Identities

Nowak, Richard M.

Overview
Works: 9 works in 18 publications in 1 language and 221 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Contributor, Author
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Richard M Nowak
Cardiac arrest : science and practice of resuscitation medicine by Norman A Paradis( Book )

8 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This new edition brings the reader up-to-date with developments in the field, focusing on practical issues of decision making, clinical management and prevention, as well as providing clear explanations of the science informing the practice. The coverage includes information on the latest pharmacotherapeutic options, the latest chest compression techniques and airway management protocols, all backed by clearly explained, evidence-based scientific research. The content is consistent with the latest guidelines for practice in this area, as detailed by the major international governing organisations
Symposium on adult respiratory emergencies( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Emergency medicine testing, a scientific analysis : proceedings of the 1985 American College of Emergency Physicians Winter Symposium, April 22-25, 1985, San Diego, California by American College of Emergency Physicians( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

CLUE: a randomized comparative effectiveness trial of IV nicardipine versus labetalol use in the emergency department by W. Frank Peacock( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cardiopulmonary-cerebral resuscitation, state of the art : proceedings of the 1984 American College of Emergency Physicians, Winter Symposium, April 8-11, 1984, Scottsdale, Arizona by American College of Emergency Physicians( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Midregional Proadrenomedullin Predicts Mortality and Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients Presenting With Chest Pain: Results From the CHOPIN Trial( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Objectives Chest pain is a common complaint to emergency departments (EDs) and clinical risk factors are used to predict which patients are at risk for worse outcomes and mortality. The goal was to assess the novel biomarker midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in prediction of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Methods This was a subanalysis of the CHOPIN study, a 16-center prospective trial that enrolled 2, 071 patients presenting with chest pain within 6 hours of onset. The primary endpoint was 6-month all-cause mortality and the secondary endpoint was 30-day and 6-month MACE: ED visits or hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, reinfarction, revascularization, and heart failure. Results MR-proADM performed similarly to troponin (cTnI; c-statistic = 0.845 and 0.794, respectively) for mortality prediction in all subjects and had similar results in those with noncardiac diagnoses. MR-proADM concentrations were stratified by decile, and the cohort in the top decile had a 9.8% 6-month mortality risk versus 0.9% risk for those in the bottom nine deciles (p <0.0001). MR-proADM, history of coronary artery disease (CAD), and hypertension were predictors of short-term MACE, while history of CAD, hypertension, cTnI, and MR-proADM were predictors of long-term MACE. Conclusions In patients with chest pain, MR-proADM predicts mortality and MACE in all-comers with chest pain and has similar prediction in those with a noncardiac diagnosis. This exploratory analysis is primarily hypotheses-generating and future prospective studies to identify its utility in risk stratification should be considered
Noninvasive Hemodynamic Monitoring in Emergency Patients with Suspected Heart Failure, Sepsis and Stroke: The Premium Registry by Richard M Nowak( )

1 edition published in 2014 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Introduction: Noninvasive hemodynamic (HD) assessments in the emergency department (ED) might assist in the diagnosis, therapeutic plan development and risk stratification of acutely ill patients. This multinational observational study was designed to initiate noninvasive HD measurements prior to any ED patient therapeutic interventions and broadly evaluate them for potential diagnostic, therapeutic and predictive value.Methods: We enrolled patients with suspected acute heart failure (AHF), sepsis or stroke. Continuous noninvasive HD monitoring was begun using the Nexfin finger cuff device (Edwards LifeSciences, BMEYE, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Beat-to-beat HD measurements were averaged for the initial 15 minutes, prior to therapeutic intervention. We performed suspected disease group comparisons and evaluated HD predictors of 30-day mortality.Results: Of 510 patients enrolled: 185 (36%) AHF, 194 (38%) sepsis and 131 (26%) stroke. HD variables were significantly different (p<0.05) amongst the groups. Cardiac output and index and stroke volume index (SVI) were highest in sepsis (6.5, 3.5, 36), followed by stroke (5.5, 2.7, 35.8), and lowest in AHF (5.4, 2.7, 33.6). The in-group HD standard deviations and ranges measurements were large, indicating heterogeneous underlying HD profiles. Presenting SVI predicted 30-day mortality for all groups.Conclusion: Presenting ED noninvasive HD data has not been previously reported in any large patient population. Our data suggest a potential role for early noninvasive HD assessments aiding in diagnosing of patients, individualizing therapy based on each person’s unique HD values and predicting 30-day mortality. Further studies and analyses are needed to determine how HD assessments should be best used in the ED. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7):-0.]
The Use of Very Low Concentrations of High-sensitivity Troponin T to Rule Out Acute Myocardial Infarction Using a Single Blood Test( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Recent single-center and retrospective studies suggest that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) could be immediately excluded without serial sampling in patients with initial high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) levels below the limit of detection (LoD) of the assay and no electrocardiogram (ECG) ischemia. Objective: We aimed to determine the external validity of those findings in a multicenter study at 12 sites in nine countries. Methods: TRAPID-AMI was a prospective diagnostic cohort study including patients with suspected cardiac chest pain within 6 hours of peak symptoms. Blood drawn on arrival was centrally tested for hs-cTnT (Roche; 99th percentile = 14 ng/L, LoD = 5 ng/L). All patients underwent serial troponin sampling over 4-14 hours. The primary outcome, prevalent AMI, was adjudicated based on sensitive troponin I (Siemens Ultra) levels. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including AMI, death, or rehospitalization for acute coronary syndrome with coronary revascularization were determined after 30 days. Results: We included 1, 282 patients, of whom 213 (16.6%) had AMI and 231 (18.0%) developed MACE. Of 560 (43.7%) patients with initial hs-cTnT levels below the LoD, four (0.7%) had AMI. In total, 471 (36.7%) patients had both initial hs-cTnT levels below the LoD and no ECG ischemia. These patients had a 0.4% (n = 2) probability of AMI, giving 99.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 96.7% to 99.9%) sensitivity and 99.6% (95% CI = 98.5% to 100.0%) negative predictive value. The incidence of MACE in this group was 1.3% (95% CI = 0.5% to 2.8%). Conclusions: In the absence of ECG ischemia, the detection of very low concentrations of hs-cTnT at admission seems to allow rapid, safe exclusion of AMI in one-third of patients without serial sampling. This could be used alongside careful clinical assessment to help reduce unnecessary hospital admissions
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.39 (from 0.31 for Cardiac ar ... to 0.99 for Noninvasiv ...)

Languages
English (17)