WorldCat Identities

Cribiore, Raffaella

Overview
Works: 36 works in 157 publications in 2 languages and 7,366 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Records and correspondence  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Academic theses  Juvenile works  Essays  Fiction 
Roles: Author, Editor, Collector, Translator, Contributor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Raffaella Cribiore
The school of Libanius in late antique Antioch by Raffaella Cribiore( )

20 editions published between 2007 and 2016 in English and held by 1,872 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book is a study of the fourth-century sophist Libanius, a major intellectual figure who ran one of the most prestigious schools of rhetoric in the later Roman Empire. He was a tenacious adherent of pagan religion and a friend of the emperor Julian, but also taught leaders of the early Christian church like St. John Chrysostom and St. Basil the Great. Raffaella Cribiore examines Libanius's training and personality, showing him to be a vibrant educator, though somewhat gloomy and anxious by nature. She traces how he cultivated a wide network of friends and former pupils and courted powerful
Libanius the sophist : rhetoric, reality, and religion in the fourth century by Raffaella Cribiore( )

14 editions published between 2012 and 2016 in English and held by 1,279 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Libanius of Antioch was a rhetorician of rare skill and eloquence. So renowned was he in the fourth century that his school of rhetoric in Roman Syria became among the most prestigious in the Eastern Empire. In this book, Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius's vast literary output--including 64 orations, 1,544 letters, and exercises for his students--to offer the fullest intellectual portrait yet of this remarkable figure whom John Chrystostom called "the sophist of the city."Libanius (314-ca. 393) lived at a time when Christianity was celebrating its triumph but paganism tried to resist. Although himself a pagan, Libanius cultivated friendships within Antioch's Christian community and taught leaders of the Church including Chrysostom and Basil of Caesarea. Cribiore calls him a "gray pagan" who did not share the fanaticism of the Emperor Julian. Cribiore considers the role that a major intellectual of Libanius's caliber played in this religiously diverse society and culture. When he wrote a letter or delivered an oration, who was he addressing and what did he hope to accomplish? One thing that stands out in Libanius's speeches is the startling amount of invective against his enemies. How common was character assassination of this sort? What was the subtext to these speeches and how would they have been received? Adapted from the Townsend Lectures that Cribiore delivered at Cornell University in 2010, this book brilliantly restores Libanius to his rightful place in the rich and culturally complex world of Late Antiquity
Gymnastics of the mind : Greek education in Hellenistic and Roman Egypt by Raffaella Cribiore( )

31 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 1,205 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is at once a thorough study of the educational system for the Greeks of Hellenistic and Roman Egypt, and a window to the vast panorama of educational practices in the Greco-Roman world. It describes how people learned, taught, and practiced literate skills, how schools functioned, and what the curriculum comprised. Raffaella Cribiore draws on over 400 papyri, ostraca (shards of pottery or slices of limestone), and tablets that feature everything from exercises involving letters of the alphabet through rhetorical compositions that represented the work of advanced students. The exceptional wealth of surviving source material renders Egypt an ideal space of reference. The book makes excursions beyond Egypt as well, particularly in the Greek East, by examining the letters of the Antiochene Libanius that are concerned with education." "Gymnastics of the Mind will be an indispensable resource to students and scholars of the ancient world and of the history of education."--Jacket
Ostraka from Trimithis by Roger S Bagnall( )

10 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 1,182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women's letters from ancient Egypt, 300 BC-AD 800 by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

19 editions published between 2006 and 2015 in English and held by 770 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"More than three hundred letters written in Greek and Egyptian by women in Egypt in the millennium from Alexander the Great to the Arab conquest survive on papyrus and pottery. These letters were written by women from various walks of life and shed light on critical social aspects of life in Egypt after the pharaohs. Roger S. Bagnall and Raffaella Cribiore collect the best preserved of these letters in translation and set them in their paleographic, linguistic, social, and economic contexts. As a result, Women's Letters from Ancient Egypt, 300 B.C.-A.D. 800, provides a sense that these women's habits, interests, and means of expression were a product more of their social and economic standing than of specifically gender-related concerns or behavior."--Jacket
Writing, teachers, and students in Graeco-Roman Egypt by Raffaella Cribiore( )

14 editions published between 1993 and 2005 in English and held by 500 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Between city and school : selected orations of Libanius by Libanius( Book )

7 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is a collection of twelve important but little-read orations of the fourth-century sophist Libanius, providing an English translation for each with a thorough introduction and copious notes. In spite of Libanius’ influence during his lifetime, he has until recently been neglected by scholars since his Greek is often intricate and difficult to approach. Libanius lived in Antioch (Syria) where he was a teacher of rhetoric: His school was the most important in the East and students flocked there from many countries. Some of the orations in this collection, like his correspondence, illuminate his relations with his students as well as his methods of teaching rhetoric, a discipline for which he had the highest regard. These orations also show that Libanius was a major figure in his city, in frequent contact with influential officials and governors, and that he even had a close relationship with the Emperor Julian. Oration 37 reveals that there were rumours that Julian had contributed to the death of his wife by asking a court doctor to poison her, while Oration 63 indicates that Libanius, usually considered to be a thorough-going pagan, was bequeathed the patrimony of a Christian friend, even though the latter's brother was bishop of Antioch. Fascinating and thought-provoking, this essential collection of translations of Libanius’ orations will be invaluable to scholars of the fourth century."--
Martina's town by Raffaella Cribiore( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A year in the life of an eight year old girl who lives in New York
AMHEIDA III by Roger S Bagnall( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ostraka from Trimithis by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 2: "This archaeological report provides a comprehensive study of the excavations carried out at Amheida House B2 in Egypt's Dakhleh Oasis between 2005 and 2007, followed by three study seasons between 2008 and 2010. The excavations at Amheida in Egypt's western desert, begun in 2001 under the aegis of Columbia University and sponsored by NYU since 2008, are investigating all aspects of social life and material culture at the administrative center of ancient Trimithis. The excavations so far have focused on three areas of this very large site: a centrally located upper-class fourth-century AD house with wall paintings, an adjoining school, and underlying remains of a Roman bath complex; a more modest house of the third century; and the temple hill, with remains of the Temple of Thoth built in the first century AD and of earlier structures. Architectural conservation has protected and partly restored two standing funerary monuments, a mud-brick pyramid and a tower tomb, both of the Roman period. This is the second volume of ostraka from the excavations Amheida (ancient Trimithis) in Egypt. It adds 491 items to the growing corpus of primary texts from the site. In addition to the catalog, the introductory sections make important contributions to understanding the role of textual practice in the life of a pre-modern small town. Issues addressed include tenancy, the administration of water, governance, the identification of individuals in the archaeological record, the management of estates, personal handwriting, and the uses of personal names. Additionally, the chapter "Ceramic Fabrics and Shapes" by Clementina Caputo breaks new ground in the treatment of these inscribed shards as both written text and physical object. This volume will be of interest to specialists in Roman-period Egypt as well as to scholars of literacy and writing in the ancient world and elsewhere."--
Writing, teachers, and students in Graeco-Roman Egypt by Raffaella Cribiore( Book )

10 editions published between 1996 and 2010 in English and Italian and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Oasis City by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

3 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Scattered through the vast expanse of stone and sand that makes up Egypt’s Western Desert are several oases. These islands of green in the midst of the Sahara owe their existence to springs and wells drawing on ancient aquifers. In antiquity, as today, they supported agricultural communities, going back to Neolithic times but expanding greatly in the millennium from the Saite pharaohs to the Roman emperors. New technologies of irrigation and transportation made the oases integral parts of an imperial economy. Amheida, ancient Trimithis, was one of those oasis communities. Located in the western part of the Dakhla Oasis, it was an important regional center, reaching a peak in the Roman period before being abandoned. Over the past decade, excavations at this well-preserved site have revealed its urban layout and brought to light houses, streets, a bath, a school, and a church. The only standing brick pyramid of the Roman period in Egypt has been restored. Wall-paintings, temple reliefs, pottery, and texts all contribute to give a lively sense of its political, religious, economic, and cultural life. This book presents these aspects of the city’s existence and its close ties to the Nile valley, by way of long desert roads, in an accessible and richly illustrated fashion."--
Ostraka from Trimithis by Roger S Bagnall( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume presents 455 inscribed pottery fragments, or ostraka, found during NYU's excavations at Amheida in the western desert of Egypt. The majority date to the Late Roman period (3rd to 4th century AD), a time of rapid social change in Egypt and the ancient Mediterranean generally
Ostraka from Trimithis by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Watching History Unfold: The Uses of Viewing in Cassius Dio, Herodian and the "Historia Augusta." by Joel S Ward( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the course of their narratives, ancient historians often provide explicit reflections about their texts, their working methodology and their status as author. In addition to these explicit statements, however, there are a wide variety of ways for authors of historical narrative to provide readers with implicit commentary of a similar, self-reflexive nature. This dissertation considers that commentary of an implicit nature, that is metahistorical commentary, communicated through instances of viewing in the texts of Cassius Dio, Herodian and the Historia Augusta. In such scenes, the activity of an internal audience that views, or watches, a spectacle, a battle or an individual can be read as analogous to the activity of external readers and/or the author himself. By using this approach it is possible to gain another, new perspective on these authors' conception of their text and/or their status as author
Amheida III. Ostraka from Trimithis, Volume 2 by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This archaeological report provides a comprehensive study of the excavations carried out at Amheida House B2 in Egypt's Dakhleh Oasis between 2005 and 2007, followed by three study seasons between 2008 and 2010. The excavations at Amheida in Egypt's western desert, begun in 2001 under the aegis of Columbia University and sponsored by NYU since 2008, are investigating all aspects of social life and material culture at the administrative center of ancient Trimithis. The excavations so far have focused on three areas of this very large site: a centrally located upper-class fourth-century AD house with wall paintings, an adjoining school, and underlying remains of a Roman bath complex; a more modest house of the third century; and the temple hill, with remains of the Temple of Thoth built in the first century AD and of earlier structures. Architectural conservation has protected and partly restored two standing funerary monuments, a mud-brick pyramid and a tower tomb, both of the Roman period. This is the second volume of ostraka from the excavations Amheida (ancient Trimithis) in Egypt. It adds 491 items to the growing corpus of primary texts from the site. In addition to the catalog, the introductory sections make important contributions to understanding the role of textual practice in the life of a pre-modern small town. Issues addressed include tenancy, the administration of water, governance, the identification of individuals in the archaeological record, the management of estates, personal handwriting, and the uses of personal names
Between city and school selected orations of Libanius by Raffaella Cribiore( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Amheida I: Ostraka from Trimithis, Volume 1 by Roger S Bagnall( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This volume presents 455 inscribed pottery fragments, or ostraka, found during NYU's excavations at Amheida in the western desert of Egypt. The majority date to the Late Roman period (3rd to 4th century AD), a time of rapid social change in Egypt and the ancient Mediterranean generally. Amheida was a small administrative center, and the full publication of these brief texts illuminates the role of writing in the daily lives of its inhabitants. The subjects covered by the Amheida ostraka include the distribution of food, the administration of wells, the commercial lives of inhabitants, their ed
P. Vars 7: Not a School Exercise by Raffaella Cribiore( )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

(Dlps) volume: 0599796.0030.003
A Personal Letter (P.Col. inv. 250) by Raffaella Cribiore( )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists: Vol. 27, No. 1-4 (1990)
 
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The school of Libanius in late antique Antioch
Covers
Gymnastics of the mind : Greek education in Hellenistic and Roman EgyptWomen's letters from ancient Egypt, 300 BC-AD 800Writing, teachers, and students in Graeco-Roman EgyptWriting, teachers, and students in Graeco-Roman Egypt
Languages
English (140)

Italian (1)