WorldCat Identities

Lee, Valerie 1950-

Overview
Works: 12 works in 30 publications in 1 language and 904 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Literature  Educational films  Internet videos  Documentary films  Interviews  Academic theses  Nonfiction films 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: PS153.N5, 818.509928708996073
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Valerie Lee
Granny midwives and Black women writers : double-dutched readings by Valerie Lee( Book )

6 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 407 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Prentice Hall anthology of African American women's literature( Book )

5 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 334 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Voices of power : African-American women( Visual )

7 editions published between 1999 and 2004 in English and held by 127 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Writers Alice Walker and bell hooks and Ohio State University faculty Dr. Martha Wharton and Dr. Valerie Lee examine the emergence of African-American women as popular and powerful voices of social conscience
I am woman( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In disc 1, Voices of power, African-American women have captured the moral imagination of mainstream America through their essays, novels, poetry, and other artistic endeavors, breaching the static lines of race, gender, and class. How have their relections so clearly articulated the hopes and philosophies of so many? In this program, writers Alice Walker and Bell Hooks and Ohio State University faculty Dr. Martha Wharton and Dr. Valerie Lee examine the emergence of African-American women as popular and powerful voices of social conscience. In disc 2, Is feminism dead?, shows that years after the women's movement opened doors for women, a new generation seems to be questioning the meaning and value of the battles that were fought. Has feminism gone out of style? Leading experts appraise the women's movement as it currently exists and discuss its relevance in today's cultural climate
I am woman : voices of power( Visual )

2 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

African-American women have captured the moral imagination of mainstream America through their essays, novels, poetry, and other artistic endeavors, breaching the static lines of race, gender, and class. How have their relections so clearly articulated the hopes and philosophies of so many? In this program, writers Alice Walker and Bell Hooks and Ohio State University faculty Dr. Martha Wharton and Dr. Valerie Lee examine the emergence of African-American women as popular and powerful voices of social conscience
Homegirls, riot grrrls and spice girls : representations and misrepresentations of feminism in music by Donna Jean Troka( )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presently, within popular culture in the United States, there exists a mainstream cultural phenomenon termed "Girl Culture." It is a female oriented, youth culture that claims to empower young women and girls. When comparing the rhetoric produced by this culture to that produced by riot grrrl culture (an all-female offshoot of the punk movement) and females within hip-hop culture (a black urban cultural movement), I posit that Girl Culture is not primarily concerned with the acquisition of power by women or equality for women. I suggest Girl Culture is an example of the fetishization and commodification of feminism. It is a eurocentric culture that often misrepresents and works against the feminist movement. Using Nancy Fraser's framework of recognition and redistribution, I demonstrate that women and girls both in the punk and rap movements work with the feminist movement to empower women. Both female rappers and riot grrrls do critical work to create important dialogues and destabilize power hierarchies, which can then lead to a redistribution of power. Finally, I suggest the utility that such music has in the classroom, as a contemporary and accessible way to teach feminist theory
"Nothing new under the sun" : Woolf and Joyce, the new woman and the new man by Cheryl Lynn Hindrichs( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The answer to the first of the Sphinx's riddles -- "which two sisters are born, the first to the second and the second to the first?"--Is also the title of Virginia Woolf's second novel, Night and Day. The parallactic structure of the riddle is duplicated in the composition of the text itself, which emphasizes a triangular structure of meaning. Poised on the threshold of modernism, James Joyce's Ulysses also stresses a parallactic structure of meaning, the necessity of seeing together, seeing the past in the present with the future. In texts published at the end of the Great War and set in the prewar period, Woolf and Joyce expose the oppressive nature of the fictions that human interactions revolve upon in order to sever the wounded attachments of the reader and writer to these past fictions, introduce new possibilities of meaning, and thus alter the trajectory of social narratives. The figures of the New Woman and New Man in these threshold texts serve as allegories of the struggle of the modernist writer to break from the tyrannies of the literary and social past, signified by the glaring sun of the Day, and step into an unwritten future, the Night. The ambivalence of the artist poised above reductive binarisms is portrayed in the failed connections between characters, the frustration of the New Woman and new womanly man, and the ambiguous conclusions of both texts. The parallactic visions of these texts ultimately suggest that literary and social change are as interdependent as night and day. In their critique of heterosexual romance and Oedipal quest fictions, both texts insist upon parallax -- holding two conflicting visions simultaneously without absolutely bridging the visions, thus leaving open a space of possibility. Woolf and Joyce particularly invoke the New Woman in order to emphasize how nostalgia for romance fictions and the absolutism of realism obscure alternative trajectories of human relations. Their re-visions of the New Woman (or new womanly man) and New Man, set against explicit evocations of New Woman fiction, Henrik Ibsen's drama, and Percy Bysshe Shelley's romanticism, depict the frustration of feminists, socialists, and artists of the First World War period. In addition to designating a liminal space marking the possibility of change, a threshold may signify a stumbling block, and in a period of tragic disappointments for feminism and socialism, Woolf and Joyce depicted how nostalgia for romance fictions and the appropriation of the New Woman and New Man by patriarchal discourses proved a stumbling block that threatened to trip the artist into a revivification of these fictions. The New Man in these texts signifies a threshold in terms of an obstacle rather than a liminal space of possibility; he is depicted as bound by romantic and masculinist notions of the solitary artist, thus perpetuating women's objectification as muse and monster. A maternal figure, representative of the patriarchal cult of domesticity that entraps men and women in nostalgia for gender conventions, colludes with the New Man. In Woolf's text, the mother and the New Man revivify the heterosexual romance plot; in Joyce's text, an avenging angel in the house haunts the New Man and revivifies the Oedipal quest plot. The New Woman and new womanly man of these texts, in seeking and feeling sympathy across differences, are figures of possibility that cross boundaries in order to connect
Human rights, social justice, and the impact of race( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Prentice Hall anthology of African American women's literature( Recording )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[This book is a] collection of African American women's literature. [The book] covers all historical periods, from the 18th century up through the early years of the 21st century; and all genres: from poems, essays, journal entries, and short stories to novels and black feminist criticism. Organized by three principles - chronology, genre, and theme. [It also] includes questions for thought and discussion at the ends of each writing.-Back cover
Women's studies directors' handbook( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Marshall's Praisesong for the widow and Estela Portillo Trambley's Trini : reclaiming heritage through literature and folklore by Gerardina Garita Jones( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mary Prince, and contexts for the History of Mary Prince, A West Indian slave, related by herself by Eva M Thompson( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The first context that I suggest is that we read Prince's oral autobiography as an incomplete record of a culturally and historically unexceptional ex-slave woman. In this context, in which Mary Prince is Everywoman, I give the ex-slave woman historically and culturally accurate options. Second, I recommend that we read A West Indian Slave as a culturally-specific narrative "in dialogue" with other nineteenth-century female-centered narratives of the African Diaspora. At the center of this chapter are the cross-cultural themes of female resistance and language, and in this context, Mary Prince is the mightily heroic -narrator/protagonist. And third, I propose that we read Prince's dictated story as an early example of the African American autobiographical form and Prince as a significant contributor to this tradition. In this context, in which Prince is a literary historical figure, I analyze conventions and form in the narratives of Prince and Frederick Douglass. The final chapter is a retrospective gaze at these contexts and constructs. It is actually a justification for the experimental nature of this project
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.33 (from 0.22 for Voices of ... to 0.80 for Women's st ...)

Granny midwives and Black women writers : double-dutched readings
Covers
The Prentice Hall anthology of African American women's literature
Alternative Names
Lee, Valerie B. 1950-

Lee, Valerie B. (Valerie Bonita), 1950-

Languages
English (30)