WorldCat Identities

Carr, Ethan 1958-

Overview
Works: 22 works in 44 publications in 1 language and 1,540 library holdings
Genres: History  Personal correspondence  Biographies  Autobiographies  Local history  Pictorial works  Academic theses  Documentary films 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: SB482.A4, 712
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ethan Carr
Mission 66 : modernism and the National Park dilemma by Ethan Carr( Book )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 505 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book examines the significance of the Mission 66 program and explores the influence of midcentury modernism on landscape design and park planning."
Wilderness by design : landscape architecture and the National Park Service by Ethan Carr( Book )

8 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 498 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Carr delves into the planning and motivations of the people who wanted to preserve America's scenic geography. He demonstrates that by drawing on historical antecedents, landscape architects and planners carefully crafted each addition to maintain maximum picturesque wonder. Tracing the history of landscape park design from British gardens up through the city park designs of Frederick Law Olmsted, Carr places national park landscape architecture within a larger historical context
Public nature : scenery, history, and park design( Book )

4 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 326 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This diverse new collection of essays, written by scholars, practitioners, and public-land managers, considers the history of public park design, as well as the parks themselves as repositories of cultural values. In exploring the role design has played in these public spaces, the contributors look not only at noticeably planned, often urban, landscapes such as Central Park or Boston's Back Bay Fens but also at parks such as Yosemite with naturally occurring scenic qualities, which require less development. The essays present design as encompassing not simply a park's appearance--its buildings and landscape features--but also its functions, how it delivers a culturally significant experience to visitors. Much park design has been fed into or organized by systems promoting preservation (the National Park Service being only the most obvious example), and many of this book's contributors stress park design's relationship to preservation, as Americans have become aware of a natural heritage they identify with strongly and want to experience. Other essays treat such engaging topics as European influences on early American parks, the peculiar nature of U.S. regional parks, the effect of the automobile on the outdoor recreational experience, and--in an international context--parks and national identity
The early Boston years, 1882-1890 by Frederick Law Olmsted( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Frederick Law Olmsted relocated from New York to the Boston area in the early 1880s. With the help of his stepson and partner, John Charles Olmsted, his professional office grew to become the first of its kind: a modern landscape architecture practice with park, subdivision, campus, residential, and other landscape design projects throughout the country. During the period covered in this volume, Olmsted and his partners, apprentices, and staff designed the exceptional park system of Boston and Brookline - including the Back Bay Fens, Franklin Park, and the Muddy River Improvement. Olmsted also designed parks for New York City, Rochester, Buffalo, and Detroit and created his most significant campus plans for Stanford University and the Lawrenceville School. The grounds of the U.S. Capitol were completed with the addition of the grand marble terraces that he designed as the transition to his surrounding landscape. Many of Olmsted's most important private commissions belong to these years. He began his work at Biltmore, the vast estate of George Washington Vanderbilt, and designed Rough Point at Newport, Rhode Island, and several other estates for members of the Vanderbilt family. Olmsted wrote more frequently on the subject of landscape design during these years than in any comparable period. He would never provide a definitive treatise or textbook on landscape architecture, but the articles presented in this volume contain some of his most mature and powerful statements on the practice of landscape architecture
The greatest beach : a history of Cape Cod National Seashore by Ethan Carr( Book )

3 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Three hundred years of parks : a timeline of New York City park history by Ethan Carr( Book )

3 editions published between 1987 and 1988 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The best planned city in the world : Olmsted, Vaux, and the Buffalo park system by Francis R Kowsky( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beginning in 1868, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux created a series of parks and parkways for Buffalo, New York, that drew national and international attention. The improvements carefully augmented the city s original plan with urban design features inspired by Second Empire Paris, including the first system of parkways to grace an American city. Displaying the plan at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, Olmsted declared Buffalo the best planned city, as to streets, public places, and grounds, in the United States, if not in the world. Olmsted and Vaux dissolved their historic partnership in 1872, but Olmsted continued his association with the Queen City of the Lakes, designing additional parks and laying out important sites within the growing metropolis. When Niagara Falls was threatened by industrial development, he led a campaign to protect the site and in 1885 succeeded in persuading New York to create the Niagara Reservation, the present Niagara Falls State Park. Two years later, Olmsted and Vaux teamed up again, this time to create a plan for the area around the Falls, a project the two grand masters regarded as the most difficult problem in landscape architecture to do justice to. In this book Francis R. Kowsky illuminates this remarkable constellation of projects. Utilizing original plans, drawings, photographs, and copious numbers of reports and letters, he brings new perspective to this vast undertaking, analyzing it as a cohesive expression of the visionary landscape and planning principles that Olmsted and Vaux pioneered
The papers of Frederick Law Olmsted by Frederick Law Olmsted( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The papers of Frederick Law Olmsted by Frederick Law Olmsted( Book )

in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The papers of Frederick Law Olmsted. 1882-1890 by Frederick Law Olmsted( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The cultural landscape of Mineral King, Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks, California : determination of eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places by Ethan Carr( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Four good guys and eight bad guys by Ethan Carr( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Mission 66" : modernism and the National Park dilemma in the United States, 1945-1972 by Ethan Carr( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The papers. 1882-1890 by Frederick Law Olmsted( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preservation through design : reclaiming Franklin Park's place in the future of Boston by Junzhi Yu( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This project is a demonstration of heritage landscape preservation done through a new design for Franklin Park in Boston, Massachusetts. Design from a preservation perspective requires sensitivity to the interacting forces between site history, existing conditions, and future needs, especially when engaging a historical landscape that was designed by a renowned figure like Olmsted. The goals of this project are to rehabilitate the Franklin Park site, securing its integrity and historical value, while allowing changes and future growth to take place
The "noblest landscape problem" : Thomas C. Vint and landscape preservation by Ethan Carr( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"First nations first" : understanding the status of Aboriginal involvement in British Columbia's community forests by Seán O'Donnell( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In 2014, the legal landscape shifted in British Columbia with the unanimous Supreme Court decision, Tsilhqot'in Nation v. British Columbia. The case resulted in a recognition of Aboriginal title, and real and substantial Aboriginal authority over large tracts of land in the province. According to legal analysts, the most significant element is the requirement for stronger consultation with First Nations and - in many cases - consent that needs to be pursued by the province's resource extraction industries prior to development. British Columbia's community forest sector is unlikely to be immune to this shift. A baseline for First Nations involvement in community forestry - both in terms of breadth and depth - has not yet been established. While Tsilhqot'in is expected to dramatically impact stakeholder engagement, to what degree and in which locales this change will occur is not well known. Through a series of semi-formal interviews conducted with people in a leadership position in 19 of the province's community forests, this paper establishes this baseline, as well as considers the potential impact of the Tsilhqot'in decision for the province's community forest sector
Faculty Research Symposium VII( Visual )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Symposium held to introduce faculty and make their work more visible to the community
Restoring landscape experience : research and new design for the battlefield landscape of Minute Man National Historic Park by Kathleen O'Connor( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This project looked critically at the landscape design of three specific battle locations located in Minute Man National Historical Park: Meriam's Corner (West Entrance), Paul Revere Capture Site, and Parker's Revenge (East Main Entrance). The landscape re-designs address three specific goals: 1. Make the landscape central to the visitor experience. 2. Enhance the interpretation of the 1775 landscape of specific sites too often overlooked or passed by. 3. Transform the overall experience of the park through limited interventions at specific sites. The landscape at Minute Man National Historical Park is at present not conveying its historic significance or landscape character that caused the Battle of April 19, 1775 to occur in this landscape. These goals hope to enhance and restore the 1775 landscape character at Minute Man while improving the overall visitor experience
Springing forth anew : progress, preservation, and park-building at Roger Williams National Memorial by Sara E Patton( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The process of local preservation, urban renewal, and national park building at Roger Williams National Memorial in Providence, Rhode Island, reveals important facets of the urban park idea. In 1958, the Providence Preservation Society and the Providence City Plan Commission jointly released the College Hill Study, which called for renewal of the College Hill neighborhood through preservation of the architecturally significant homes, selective demolition, and the creation of a new National Park Unit dedicated to Providence's founder, Roger Williams. The new park, established in 1965, went through a lengthy planning process before opening in 1984. The planning process revealed concerns about determining historical authenticity, supporting the revitalized historic district of College Hill, and preventing the park from becoming a haven for undesirable people and activities. Since its opening, the park has grown into a mature green space which is an important part of the civic and cultural life of Providence. The success of this park in fulfilling the goals of its planners and continuing to provide a valued green space for residents demonstrates an achievement that has important implications for ongoing urban park building by the National Park Service
 
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Mission 66 : modernism and the National Park dilemma
Covers
Wilderness by design : landscape architecture and the National Park ServiceThe papers of Frederick Law Olmsted
Languages
English (42)