WorldCat Identities

Lupia, Arthur 1964-

Overview
Works: 42 works in 96 publications in 3 languages and 1,896 library holdings
Genres: Software  Case studies  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Commentator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Arthur Lupia
The democratic dilemma : can citizens learn what they need to know? by Arthur Lupia( Book )

18 editions published between 1996 and 2003 in English and held by 601 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In The Democratic Dilemma, Professors Arthur Lupia and Mathew McCubbins explain how citizens make decisions about complex issues. Combining insights from economics, political science, and the cognitive sciences, they develop theories and experiments about learning and choice. They use these tools to identify the requirements for reasoned choice - the choice that a citizen would make if he or she possessed a certain (perhaps greater) level of knowledge. The results clarify debates about voter, juror, and legislator competence and also reveal how the design of political institutions affects citizens' abilities to govern themselves effectively
Uninformed : why people know so little about politics and what we can do about it by Arthur Lupia( Book )

10 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in English and held by 452 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Research polls, media interviews, and everyday conversations reveal an unsettling truth: citizens, while well-meaning and even passionate about current affairs, appear to know very little about politics. Hundreds of surveys document vast numbers of citizens answering even basic questions about government incorrectly. Given this unfortunate state of affairs, it is not surprising that more knowledgeable people often deride the public for its ignorance. Some experts even think that less informed citizens should stay out of politics altogether. As Arthur Lupia shows in Uninformed, this is not constructive. At root, critics of public ignorance fundamentally misunderstand the problem. Many experts believe that simply providing people with more facts will make them more competent voters. However, these experts fail to understand how most people learn, and hence don't really know what types of information are even relevant to voters. Feeding them information they don't find relevant does not address the problem. In other words, before educating the public, we need to educate the educators. Lupia offers not just a critique, though; he also has solutions. Drawing from a variety of areas of research on topics like attention span and political psychology, he shows how we can actually increase issue competence among voters in areas ranging from gun regulation to climate change. To attack the problem, he develops an arsenal of techniques to effectively convey to people information they actually care about. Citizens sometimes lack the knowledge that they need to make competent political choices, and it is undeniable that greater knowledge can improve decision making. But we need to understand that voters either don't care about or pay attention to much of the information that experts think is important. Uninformed provides the keys to improving political knowledge and civic competence: understanding what information is important to and knowing how to best convey it to them."--Publisher's website
Positive changes in political science : the legacy of Richard D. Mckelvey's most influential writings( Book )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

UNINFORMED : why people seem to know so little about politics and what we can do about it by Arthur Lupia( Book )

3 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Minshusei no direnma : Shimin wa shiru hitsuyō no aru koto o gakushūdekiruka( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in Japanese and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uninformed : Why People Know So Little About Politics and What We Can Do About It by Arthur Lupia( Recording )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Research polls, media interviews, and everyday conversations reveal an unsettling truth: citizens, while well-meaning and even passionate about current affairs, appear to know very little about politics. Hundreds of surveys document vast numbers of citizens answering even basic questions about government incorrectly. Given this unfortunate state of affairs, it is not surprising that more knowledgeable people often deride the public for its ignorance. Some experts even think that less informed citizens should stay out of politics altogether. As Arthur Lupia shows in Uninformed, this is not constructive. At root, critics of public ignorance fundamentally misunderstand the problem. Many experts believe that simply providing people with more facts will make them more competent voters. However, these experts fail to understand how most people learn, and hence don't really know what types of information are even relevant to voters. Feeding them information they don't find relevant does not address the problem. In other words, before educating the public, we need to educate the educators. Lupia offers not just a critique, though; he also has solutions. Drawing from a variety of areas of research on topics like attention span and political psychology, he shows how we can actually increase issue competence among voters in areas ranging from gun regulation to climate change. To attack the problem, he develops an arsenal of techniques to effectively convey to people information they actually care about. Citizens sometimes lack the knowledge that they need to make competent political choices, and it is undeniable that greater knowledge can improve decision making. But we need to understand that voters either don't care about or pay attention to much of the information that experts think is important. Uninformed provides the keys to improving political knowledge and civic competence: understanding what information is important to others and knowing how to best convey it to them."--Cover
Ārāʼ min dākhil al-shabakah : taʼthīr al-mawāqiʻ al-iliktrūnīyah fī al-ihtimāmāt al-siyāsiyah ladá al-shubbān by Arthur Lupia( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in Arabic and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effect of political information on direct democracy strategies and outcomes by Arthur Lupia( Book )

3 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Competitive campaigns and the responsiveness of collective choice by Elisabeth R Gerber( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When do campaigns matter? : informed votes, the heteroscedastic logit and the responsiveness of electoral outcomes by Elisabeth R Gerber( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uninformed why people seem to know so little about politics and what we can do about it : a scientific perspective on information, knowledge, and competence by Arthur Lupia( Book )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How state goernment [i.e. government] responds to voter initiatives and federal mandates by Elisabeth R Gerber( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effect of political information on direct democracy strategies and outcomes by Arthur Lupia( )

1 edition published in 1991 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The intent of the dissertation is to detail the effects of political information on participant strategies and outcomes in an electoral environment called "direct democracy." Direct democracy is a decision-making institution in which an agenda setter chooses an alternative to a pre-determined Status Quo and voters vote for either the Status Quo or the agenda setter's alternative. Through the use of a spatial election model, a survey of California insurance reform voters, and a series of laboratory experiments, I show how the direct democracy outcome corresponds to the underlying preferences of a majority of the electorate. The spatial model is used to establish that under conditions of incomplete information, the direct democracy outcome corresponds to the (full information) wishes of a majority of the electorate only when there are sufficient opportunities to cue off of the actions of other, credible, electoral participants. The empirical tools and experiments are used to examine electoral environments where different types of information are available. It is established that voters do not require full information in order to vote for their full information preferred alternative. It is also established that, in the absence of certain types of information, rational voters can cast votes for alternatives that lead to their least preferred outcome. That voters do not require full information in order to vote for their full information preferred alternative suggests that voters do not necessarily need to understand an issue to vote in their own best interest. That rational voters can cast "ex post mistaken" votes under conditions of incomplete information implies that direct democracy outcomes can be manipulated by well-endowed interests. The dissertation details the conditions under which each of these outcomes is likely to occur
Uninformed : why people seem to know so little about politics and what we can do about it by Arthur Lupia( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Credibility and the responsiveness of direct legislation by Arthur Lupia( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An alternative statistical measure for racially polarized voting by Kenneth McCue( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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The democratic dilemma : can citizens learn what they need to know?
Alternative Names
Arthur Lupia American political scientist

Arthur Lupia Amerikaans politicoloog

Lupia, Arthur William 1964-

آرثر لوبيا، 1964-

ルピア, アーサー

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Positive changes in political science : the legacy of Richard D. Mckelvey's most influential writings