WorldCat Identities

Smyth, Terry

Overview
Works: 18 works in 53 publications in 1 language and 753 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Biographies  Humor  Remote-sensing images  Pictorial works  Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV6439.U52, 362.6
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Terry Smyth
Caring for older people : creative approaches to good practice by Terry Smyth( Book )

10 editions published between 1992 and 2001 in English and Undetermined and held by 177 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Caring for Older People has been specially adapted for Australia, and offers a systematic and imaginative approach to care planning based on the authors' belief in the positive aspects of old age. Care of the whole person is discussed in detail: physical, psychological, social, educational and spiritual needs are all covered. The need for care workers to have an awareness of the values of a multicultural society is stressed throughout. Care workers are encouraged to question what is involved in the caring process and to reflect on its impact on their own lives. The work-based activities develop the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective care worker. Information is presented clearly and simply throughout, making Caring for Older People an invaluable book for those training in the care sector or caring for an older person in their home
Australian desperadoes by TERRY SMYTH( Book )

8 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Coves - San Francisco's first organised-crime gang - were Australians: men and women with criminal careers in Australia who had come to the US, mostly illegally, during the gold rush. The Coves had come not to dig for gold but to unleash a crime wave the likes of which America had never seen. Robbery, murder, arson and extortion were the Coves' stock-in-trade, and it was said that the leader of the gang, Jim Stewart, had killed more men than any man in California. The gang's base, in the waterfront district, came to be known as Sydney Town. The area was a no-go zone for police - many of whom were in Stewart's pocket anyway - so, just as Capone would one day rule Chicago, the Coves ruled San Francisco. And more than once, just to make sure there was no doubt that Frisco was their town, they burnt it down. The Coves were hated and feared by the respectable citizens of San Francisco - who derisively called them 'Sydney Ducks' but never to their faces - and, realising that the forces of the law could not, or would not, take them on, decided lynch law was the only solution, and formed a vigilante group. The streets of San Francisco became a battlefield as the Coves and the vigilantes fought for control of the city, with gunfights and lynchings almost daily spectacles as the police stood idly by. Jim Stewart was arrested in Sacramento for killing a sheriff, but escaped to be involved in one the most celebrated cases of mistaken identity in the annals of American crime. When the smoke cleared, the Coves' reign of terror was over. Some were strung up from storefronts in the street, some fell in a deadly gunfight with Jonathan R. Davis, one of the fastest guns in the west, others escaped capture and returned to Australia. The story of the Sydney Coves is little-known, fascinating and well worth telling
Australian confederates by Terry Smyth( Book )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Summer, 1865. The colony of Victoria is thriving. When Confederate States Ship Shenandoah sails into bustling Port Phillip Bay, Melburnians' curiosity overcomes any squeamishness about the support of slavery. For more than three weeks, the Americans are fêted enthusiastically. When the sleek black raider steams back through the heads on 19 February, on board are 42 Australians who have secretly enlisted to fight for the South in the American Civil War. So much for the law against foreign warships recruiting in a neutral port. Under the command of the enigmatic Captain James Waddell, the raider proceeds to wipe out almost the entire New England whaling fleet. The Shenandoah fires the last shot of the water, having captured, burned and ransomed 38 Union ships and taken more than 1,000 prisoners. Award-winning journalist Terry Smyth paints a broad canvas in the telling of this electric piece of history. He brings to life the 42 Australians who sailed off to adventure and controversy, among them the last man to die in the service of the Confederacy.--Publisher's description
Denny Day : the life and times of Australia's greatest lawman - the forgotten hero of the Myall Creek Massacre by Terry Smyth( Book )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Captain Edward Denny Day - the only law 'from the Big River to the sea' - was Australia's greatest lawman, yet few have heard of him. This is his story. Once there was a wilderness- Australia's frontier, a dangerous and unforgiving place where outlaws ruled the roads and killers were hailed as heroes. It was here, in 1838, that one man's uncompromising sense of justice changed history and shocked the world. Denny Day was a vicar's son from Ireland. A member of the Anglo-Irish ruling class, as a young man Day joined the British Army before resigning to seek his fortune in New South Wales. There he accepted the most challenging role in the young colony- keeping the peace on the frontier. Denny Day's abiding legacy is the capture of the perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre - the most infamous mass-murder in Australian history, and the first time white men were convicted of the murder of Aborigines. Yet Day won no praise for bringing to justice the killers of 28 innocent men, women and children at Myall Creek. Rather, he was scorned and shunned, fiercely attacked by the press, by powerful landowners who hired the colony's top lawyers to defend the killers, and by the general public. The 11 men tracked down and arrested by Day faced two sensational trials, and seven of them were eventually found guilty of murder and hanged. The case sparked an international outcry, resulting in stricter government policies protecting the rights of Indigenous peoples. There are many colourful characters, heroes and villains, in Denny Day's story- inspirational frontier women; outlaws captured in a desperate firefight; brave and wily Aboriginal resistance leaders; gormless colonial officials; privileged English nobles and persecuted Irish immigrants; convicts and freemen; and, for good measure, an American pirate. Denny Day was commended for bravery during his lifetime, but only in regards to taming the frontier settlements. Even in his obituary, Myall Creek is not mentioned
Napoleon's Australia : the incredible story of Bonaparte's secret plan to invade Australia by TERRY SMYTH( Book )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the northern winter of 1814, a French armada set sail for New South Wales. The Armada's mission was the invasion of Sydney, and its inspiration and its fate were interwoven with one of history's greatest love stories - Napoleon and Josephine. The Empress Josephine was fascinated by all things Australian. In the gardens of her grand estate, Malmaison, she kept kangaroos, emus, black swans and other Australian animals, along with hundreds of native plants brought back by French explorers in peacetime. And even when war raged between France and Britain, ships known to be carrying Australian flora and fauna for 'Josephine's Ark' were given safe passage. Napoleon, too, had an abiding interest in Australia, but for quite different reasons. What Britain and its Australian colonies did not know was that French explorers visiting these shores, purporting to be naturalists on scientific expeditions, were in fact spies, gathering vital information on the colony's defences. It was ripe for the picking. The conquest of Australia was on Bonaparte's agenda for world domination, and detailed plans had been made for the invasion and for how French Australia would be governed. How it all came together and how it fell apart is a remarkable tale - history with an element of the 'What if?' No less remarkable is how the tempestuous relationship between Napoleon and his empress affected the fate of the Great Southern Land. Today, on the island of Saint Helena, where Napoleon was exiled after his defeat at Waterloo, Sydney golden wattle grows wild. Napoleon planted it there to remind him of Josephine
Managing health and social care : a guide for supervisors and managers by Terry Smyth( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and Undetermined and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Denny Day : the life and time of Australia's great lawman : the forgotten hero of the Myall Creek Massacre by Terry Smyth( Recording )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Denny Day was a vicar's son from Ireland. A member of the Anglo-Irish ruling class, as a young man Day joined the British Army before resigning to seek his fortune in New South Wales. There he accepted the most challenging role in the young colony: keeping the peace on the frontier. Denny Day's abiding legacy is the capture of the perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre, the most infamous mass-murder in Australian history, and the first time white men were convicted of the murder of Aborigines. Yet Day won no praise for bringing to justice the killers of 28 innocent men, women and children at Myall Creek. Rather, he was scorned and shunned, fiercely attacked by the press, by powerful landowners who hired the colony's top lawyers to defend the killers, and by the general public. The 11 men tracked down and arrested by Day faced two sensational trials, and seven of them were eventually found guilty of murder and hanged. The case sparked an international outcry, resulting in stricter government policies protecting the rights of Indigenous peoples
Mistress by Matthew Benns( Book )

3 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is it that drives a man to risk everything for a Mistress? And why do the women do it? It is a world of scorned wives, rich men and desperate, lonely Mistresses chasing a fantasy while making do with the crumbs that spill from the table. Psychologists and marriage therapists will offer insight and explanation as it explores the illicit lovers of Australia's rich, famous and powerful through the years. Kerry Packer, Australia's richest man had a string of mistresses. Model Carol Lopes killed herself when he dumped her. Ita Buttrose refuses to discuss their affair. Packer was a serial philanderer and only moved back to his wife Roz and home from the flat of his mistress, gym owner Julie Trethowan, the day before he died. Australia's politicians love a mistress. Bob Hawke had a prolonged love affair with his biographer Blanche d'Alpuget before finally casting aside loyal wife Hazel. Former Liberal leader Sir Billy Snedden died on the job in a Sydney motel room with his lover. He was found wearing only a condom. She considerately called his son Drew to break the sad news, which was OK because it was Drew's ex-girlfriend Wendy. I'm sure the old man went out happy - anyone would be proud to die on the job, said Drew later, scotching rumours that his father had been cavorting with fashion designer Prue Acton as he died. Post war Labor hero Ben Chifley also died in a hotel room with his secretary and Mistress Phyllis Donnelly - and not his wife Elizabeth. What only came out later was that Chifley had not only been conducting a love affair with Phyllis but also her sister Nell. This book will also reveal the long-term Australian mistress of Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos, illustrating once again how the Mistress is defined by the man she takes to bed
101 benefits of baldness by Trevor Waring( Book )

2 editions published between 1995 and 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Sun-Herald pictures from space : [Australia] by Terry Smyth( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Denny Day The Life and Times of Australia's Greatest Lawman, the Forgotten Hero of the Myall Creek Massacre by Terry Smyth( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Once there was a wilderness: Australia's frontier, a dangerous and unforgiving place where outlaws ruled the roads and killers were hailed as heroes. It was here, in 1838, that one man's uncompromising sense of justice changed history and shocked the world. Denny Day was a vicar's son from Ireland. A member of the Anglo-Irish ruling class, as a young man Day joined the British Army before resigning to seek his fortune in New South Wales. There he accepted the most challenging role in the young colony: keeping the peace on the frontier. Denny Day's abiding legacy is the capture of the perpetrators of the Myall Creek Massacre - the most infamous mass-murder in Australian history, and the first time white men were convicted of the murder of Aborigines. Yet Day won no praise for bringing to justice the killers of 28 innocent men, women and children at Myall Creek. Rather, he was scorned and shunned, fiercely attacked by the press, by powerful landowners who hired the colony's top lawyers to defend the killers, and by the general public. The 11 men tracked down and arrested by Day faced two sensational trials, and seven of them were eventually found guilty of murder and hanged. The case sparked an international outcry, resulting in stricter government policies protecting the rights of Indigenous peoples. There are many colourful characters, heroes and villains, in Denny Day's story: inspirational frontier women; outlaws captured in a desperate firefight; brave and wily Aboriginal resistance leaders; gormless colonial officials; privileged English nobles and persecuted Irish immigrants; convicts and freemen; and, for good measure, an American pirate. Denny Day was commended for bravery during his lifetime, but only in regards to taming the frontier settlements. Even in his obituary, Myall Creek is not mentioned
The roots of remembrance : tracing the memory practices of the children of Far East prisoners of war by Terry Smyth( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Now & then : the Sun-Herald millennium souvenir : a pictorial record of the evolution of Sydney( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The art of carpentry simplified, by Terry Smyth by Terry Smyth( Book )

1 edition published in 1913 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Napoleon's Australia the incredible story of Bonaparte's secret plan to invade Australia by Terry Smyth( )

1 edition published in 2018 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the northern winter of 1814, a French armada set sail for New South Wales. The Armada's mission was the invasion of Sydney, and its inspiration and its fate were interwoven with one of history's greatest love stories - Napoleon and Josephine. The Empress Josephine was fascinated by all things Australian. In the gardens of her grand estate, Malmaison, she kept kangaroos, emus, black swans and other Australian animals, along with hundreds of native plants brought back by French explorers in peacetime. And even when war raged between France and Britain, ships known to be carrying Australian flora and fauna for 'Josephine's Ark' were given safe passage. Napoleon, too, had an abiding interest in Australia, but for quite different reasons. What Britain and its Australian colonies did not know was that French explorers visiting these shores, purporting to be naturalists on scientific expeditions, were in fact spies, gathering vital information on the colony's defences. It was ripe for the picking. The conquest of Australia was on Bonaparte's agenda for world domination, and detailed plans had been made for the invasion and for how French Australia would be governed. How it all came together and how it fell apart is a remarkable tale - history with an element of the 'What if?'
Managing health and social change by Terry SMYTH( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

AUSTRALIAN DESPERADOES (16PT LARGE PRINT EDITION) by TERRY SMYTH( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Australian desperadoes the incredible story of how Australian gangsters terrorised California by Terry Smyth( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Coves - San Francisco's first organised-crime gang - were Australians- men and women with criminal careers in Australia who had come to the US, mostly illegally, during the gold rush. The Coves had come not to dig for gold but to unleash a crime wave the likes of which America had never seen. Robbery, murder, arson and extortion were the Coves' stock-in-trade, and it was said that the leader of the gang, Jim Stuart, had killed more men than any man in California. The gang's base, in the waterfront district, came to be known as Sydney Town. The area was a no-go zone for police - many of whom were in Stuart's pocket anyway - so, just as Capone would one day rule Chicago, the Coves ruled San Francisco. And more than once, just to make sure there was no doubt that Frisco was their town, they burnt it down. The Coves were hated and feared by the respectable citizens of San Francisco - who derisively called them 'Sydney Ducks' but never to their faces - and, realising that the forces of the law could not, or would not, take them on, decided lynch law was the only solution, and formed a vigilante group. The streets of San Francisco became a battlefield as the Coves and the vigilantes fought for control of the city, with gunfights and lynchings almost daily spectacles as the police stood idly by. Jim Stewart was arrested in Sacramento for killing a sheriff, but escaped to be involved in one the most celebrated cases of mistaken identity in the annals of American crime. When the smoke cleared, the Coves' reign of terror was over. Some were strung up from storefronts in the street, some fell in a deadly gunfight with Jonathan R. Davis, one of the fastest guns in the west, others escaped capture and returned to Australia. The story of the Sydney Coves is little-known, fascinating and well worth telling
 
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English (49)