WorldCat Identities

Somerset, Fiona

Overview
Works: 23 works in 86 publications in 2 languages and 4,195 library holdings
Genres: History  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Church history  Sources  Bibliography  Periodicals 
Roles: Author, Editor, Collector, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Fiona Somerset
Clerical discourse and lay audience in late medieval England by Fiona Somerset( )

13 editions published between 1998 and 2005 in English and held by 1,817 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The translation of learned Latin materials into English between around 1370 and 1410 was a highly controversial activity. It was thought likely to make available to lay audiences the authoritative and intellectual information and methods of argument previously only accessible to an educated elite - and with that knowledge the power of information. Fiona Somerset's 1998 study examines what kinds of academic material were imported into English, what sorts of audience were projected for this kind of clerical discourse and how writers positioned themselves with respect to potential audience and opponents. The well-known concerns with clerical corruption and lay education of authors such as Langland, Trevisa, and Wyclif are linked to those of more obscure writers in both Latin and English, some only recently edited, or only extant in manuscript
Feeling like saints : Lollard writings after Wyclif by Fiona Somerset( )

8 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in English and held by 612 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These writings provide rich evidence for how lollard writers collaborated with one another and with their readers to produce a distinctive religious identity based around structures of feeling. Lollards wanted to feel like saints. From Wyclif they drew an extraordinarily rigorous ethic of mutual responsibility that disregarded both social status and personal risk. They recalled their commitment to this ethic by reading narratives of physical suffering and vindication, metaphorically martyring themselves by inviting scorn for their zeal, and enclosing themselves in the virtues rather than the religious cloister. Yet in many ways they were not that different from their contemporaries, especially those with similar impulses to exceptional holiness."--BOOK JACKET
The vulgar tongue : medieval and postmedieval vernacularity( )

13 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 597 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wycliffite spirituality( Book )

2 editions published between 2009 and 2013 in English and held by 327 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Both in its own time and subsequently, the Lollard or Wycliffite movement of religious reform in late medieval England has been described in predominantly negative terms: historians, theologians, and literary scholars have emphasized the ways in which Wycliffites and their supporters rejected the doctrines of the institutional church, argued against such practices and structures as permanent endowment and the papacy, and constructed themselves as a remnant of true Christians persecuted by Antichrist. Luckily, however, there are other sources of evidence for the spiritual and devotional practices of Wycliffites and their communities. On the one hand, some particularly attentive bishops preserved in their registers many otherwise inaccessible details of the ways in which heresy defendants practiced their faith. On the other hand, recent scholarship has made it indisputable that any serious study of this late medieval heresy must engage critically and extensively with the texts written by those condemned as heretics. This new volume in the Classics of Western Spirituality series is a collection of modern English translations of Wycliffite texts and heresy trial records which disclose that, far from practicing a wholly negative Christianity, Wycliffites were as keenly interested in the spiritual life as many of their contemporaries. While Wycliffite spirituality, like that of many a persecuted Christian group, placed high value on the confession of faith and readiness to endure persecution or even martyrdom, they did not think of themselves as heretics who had rejected Christianity. Indeed, they engaged closely with contemporary pastoral and spiritual movements, and their attempts to provide an alternative spirituality were better developed and more coherent than scholarship has yet acknowledged
Four Wycliffite dialogues( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and English, Middle and held by 291 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This group of previously unpublished prose treatises, all cast as fictional dialogues, survives in single and different manuscripts of the early fifteenth century. They are probably by different authors, but they cohere in their ideological outlook, subject matter and use of the debate form. The first and longest, 'Jon and Richard', and the second, a debate between a 'Friar and a Secular', express anti-fraternal opinions, while the third and fourth, between 'Reson and Gabbing' and a 'Clerk and a Knight' are concerned with the relative powers of the Church and state. The four dialogues are of particular interest not just for their debate form, but for their assimilation into the vernacular of academic vocabulary and habits of reasoning, and for their outspoken expression of views which tend to be expressed obscurely or allusively in other Wycliffite writing."--Jacket
Lollards and their influence in late medieval England( Book )

14 editions published between 2003 and 2009 in English and held by 289 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Who were the Lollards? What did Lollards believe? What can the manuscript record of Lollard works teach us about the textual dissemination of Lollard beliefs and the audience for Lollard writings? What did Lollards have in common with other reformist or dissident thinkers in late medieval England, and how were their views distinctive? These questions have been fundamental to the modern study of Lollardy (also known as Wycliffism). The essays in this book reveal their broader implications for the study of English literature and history through a series of closely focused studies that demonstrate the wide-ranging influence of Lollard writings and ideas on later medieval English culture. Introductions to previous scholarship, and an extensive Bibliography of printed resources for the study of Wyclif and Wycliffites, provide an entry to scholarship for those new to the field. The contributors include: David Aers, Margaret Aston, Helen Barr, Mishtooni Bose, Lawrence M. Clopper, Andrew Cole, Ralph Hanna III, Maureen Jurkowski, Andrew Larsen, Geoffrey H. Martin, Wendy Scase, Fiona Somerset, and Emily Steiner. Fiona Somerset is at Duke University, Durham NC; Jill C.; Havens is at Texas Christian University; and Derrick G. Pitard is at Slippery Rock University, PA
Truth and tales : cultural mobility and medieval media( Book )

9 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 165 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In the medieval period, as in the media culture of the present, learned and popular forms of talk were intermingled everywhere. They were also highly mobile, circulating in speech, writing, and symbol, as performances as well as in material objects. The communication through and between different media we all negotiate in daily life did not develop from a previous separation of orality and writing, but from a communications network not unlike our own, if slower, and similarly shaped by disparities of access. Truth and Tales: Cultural Mobility and Medieval Media, edited by Fiona Somerset and Nicholas Watson, develops a variety of approaches to the labor of imaginatively reconstructing this network from its extant artifacts. Truth and Tales includes fourteen essays by medieval literary scholars and historians. Some essays focus on written artifacts that convey high or popular learning in unexpected ways. Others address a social problem of concern to all, demonstrating the genres and media through which it was negotiated. Still others are centered on one or more texts, detailing their investments in popular as well as learned knowledge, in performance as well as writing. This collective archaeology of medieval media provides fresh insight for medieval scholars and media theorists alike"--
Four Wycliffite dialogues : dialogue between Jon and Richard, dialogue between a friar and a secular, dialogue between Reson and Gabbyng, dialogue between a clerk and a knight( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This group of previously unpublished prose treatises, all cast as fictional dialogues, survives in single and different manuscripts of the early fifteenth century. They are probably by different authors, but they cohere in their ideological outlook, subject matter and use of the debate form. The first and longest, 'Jon and Richard', and the second, a debate between a 'Friar and a Secular', express anti-fraternal opinions, while the third and fourth, between 'Reson and Gabbing' and a 'Clerk and a Knight' are concerned with the relative powers of the Church and state. The four dialogues are of particular interest not just for their debate form, but for their assimilation into the vernacular of academic vocabulary and habits of reasoning, and for their outspoken expression of views which tend to be expressed obscurely or allusively in other Wycliffite writing."--BOOK JACKET
A companion to Lollardy by Patrick Hornbeck( Book )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The last twenty-five years have seen an explosion of scholarly studies on lollardy, the late medieval religious phenomenon that has often been credited with inspiring the English Reformation. In 'A companion to Lollardy', Patrick Hornbeck sums up what we know about lollardy and what have been its fortunes in the hands of its most recent chroniclers. This volume describes trends in the study of lollardy and explores the many individuals, practices, texts, and beliefs that have been called lollard. 00Joined by Mishtooni Bose and Fiona Somerset, Hornbeck assesses how scholars and polemicists, literary critics and ecclesiastics have defined lollardy and evaluated its significance, showing how lollardy has served as a window on religion, culture, and society in late medieval England
Four Wycliffite dialogues( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Lollards and John Wycliff by Fiona Somerset( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, Volume 37 by Fiona Somerset( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Four wycliffite dialogues( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Imaginary publics : extraclergical writers and vernacular audience in late-medieval England by Fiona Somerset( )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Yearbook of Langland studies( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Four Wycliffe dialogues by John Wycliffe( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English, Middle and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Four Wycliffite dialogues: Dialogue between Jon and Richard( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Yearbook of langland studies( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The yearbook of Langland studies( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Four Wycliffite dialogues Four Wycliffite dialogues : dialogue between Jon and Richard, dialogue between a friar and a secular, dialogue between Reson and Gabbyng, dialogue between a clerk and a knight Four Wycliffite dialogues Four Wycliffite dialogues : dialogue between Jon and Richard : dialogue between a friar and a secular ; dialogue between Reson and Gabbyng ; dialogue between a clerk and a knight Four wycliffite dialogues Four Wycliffe dialogues Four Wycliffite dialogues: Dialogue between Jon and Richard
Covers
The vulgar tongue : medieval and postmedieval vernacularityFour Wycliffite dialoguesLollards and their influence in late medieval EnglandFour Wycliffite dialogues : dialogue between Jon and Richard, dialogue between a friar and a secular, dialogue between Reson and Gabbyng, dialogue between a clerk and a knightFour Wycliffite dialoguesFour Wycliffite dialogues : dialogue between Jon and Richard : dialogue between a friar and a secular ; dialogue between Reson and Gabbyng ; dialogue between a clerk and a knightFour wycliffite dialoguesFour Wycliffe dialoguesFour Wycliffite dialogues: Dialogue between Jon and Richard
Alternative Names
Somerset, Fiona E. 1967-

Somerset, Fiona Elizabeth 1967-

Languages