WorldCat Identities

Leuz, Christian 1967-

Overview
Works: 48 works in 154 publications in 2 languages and 1,723 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Christian Leuz
The economics and politics of accounting : international perspectives on research, trends, policy, and practice by Christian Leuz( )

35 editions published between 2004 and 2006 in English and held by 1,058 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"By providing international perspectives on recent research trends, policy issues and business practice, this seminal book will be of interest to academics, researchers, and graduate students of accounting finance, business studies, sociology, and political economy."--Jacket
Do foreigners invest less in poorly governed firms? by Christian Leuz( )

10 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As domestic sources of outside finance are limited in many countries around the world, it is important to understand the factors that influence whether foreign outside investors provide capital to a country's firms. This study examines whether and why investor concern about corporate governance results in fewer foreign holdings. We use a comprehensive set of foreign holdings by U.S. investors as a proxy for foreign investment and analyze a sample of 4,411 firms from 29 emerging market and developed economies. We find that foreigners invest significantly less in firms that are poorly governed, i.e., firms that have ownership structures that are more conducive to outside investor expropriation. Interestingly, this finding is not simply a matter of a country's economic development but appears to be directly related to a country's information rules and legal institutions. We therefore argue that information problems faced by foreign investors play an important role in this result. Supporting this explanation, we show that foreign investment is lower in firms that appear to engage in more earnings management
Did fair-value accounting contribute to the financial crisis? by Christian Laux( )

9 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recent financial crisis has led to a major debate about fair-value accounting. Many critics have argued that fair-value accounting, often also called mark-to-market accounting, has significantly contributed to the financial crisis or, at least, exacerbated its severity. In this paper, we assess these arguments and examine the role of fair-value accounting in the financial crisis using descriptive data and empirical evidence. Based on our analysis, it is unlikely that fair-value accounting added to the severity of the current financial crisis in a major way. While there may have been downward spirals or asset-fire sales in certain markets, we find little evidence that these effects are the result of fair-value accounting. We also find little support for claims that fair-value accounting leads to excessive write-downs of banks' assets. If anything, empirical evidence to date points in the opposite direction, that is, towards overvaluation of bank assets
Information asymmetry, information precision, and the cost of capital by Richard A Lambert( )

8 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The consequences of information differences across investors in capital markets are still much debated. This paper examines the relation between information differences across investors and the cost of capital, and makes three points. First, in models of perfect competition, information differences across investors affect a firm's cost of capital through investors' average information precision, and not information asymmetry per se. Second, the average precision effect of information that is heterogeneously distributed across investors is unlikely to diversify away when there exist many firms whose cash flows covary. Thus, better disclosure can reduce a firm's cost of capital. Third, the precision effect does not give rise to a separate information-risk factor. These points are important to empirical research in accounting and finance, as well as to regulators who debate future disclosure requirements and the consequences of prior requirements such as Regulation Fair Disclosure
Capital-market effects of securities regulation : the role of implementation and enforcement by Hans B Christensen( )

8 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines capital market effects of changes in securities regulation. We analyze two key capital market directives in the European Union (EU) that tightened market abuse and transparency regulation and, in particular, their enforcement. All EU member states were required to adopt these two directives but did so at different points in time. Our research design exploits this differential timing of the same regulatory change for identification and uses cross-sectional variation in the capital-market effects to highlight the role of implementation and enforcement for regulatory outcomes. We find that, on average, market liquidity increases and firms' cost of capital decreases as EU member states tighten market abuse and transparency regulation. The effects are larger in countries that implement and enforce the directives more strictly. They are also stronger in countries with traditionally stricter securities regulation and with a better track record of implementing regulation and government policies in general. Overall, these findings show that the effects of regulation depend crucially on implementation and enforcement. Moreover, the results indicate that the same forces that have limited the effectiveness of securities regulation in the past are still at play when new rules are introduced, which has important implications for the expected outcomes of regulatory reforms as well as efforts to harmonize regulation across countries
Disclosure and the cost of capital : evidence from firms' responses to the Enron shock by Christian Leuz( )

8 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the link between disclosure and the cost of capital. We exploit an exogenous cost of capital shock created by the Enron scandal in Fall 2001 and analyze firms' disclosure responses to this shock. These tests are opposite to the typical research design that analyzes cost of capital responses to disclosure changes. In reversing the tests and using an exogenous shock, we mitigate concerns about omitted variables in traditional cross-sectional disclosure studies. We estimate shocks to firms' betas around the Enron events and the ensuing transparency crisis. Our analysis shows that these beta shocks are associated with increased disclosure. Firms expand the number of pages of their annual 10-K filings, notably the sections containing the financial statements and footnotes. The increase in disclosure is particularly pronounced for firms that have positive cost of capital shocks and larger financing needs. We also find that firms respond with additional interim disclosures (e.g., 8-K filings) and that these disclosures are complementary to the 10-K disclosures. Finally, we show that firms₂ disclosure responses reduce firms' costs of capital and hence the impact of the transparency crisis
On the economics of audit partner tenure and rotation : evidence from PCAOB data by Brandon Gipper( )

3 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides the first partner tenure and rotation analysis for a large cross-section of U.S. publicly listed firms over an extended period. We analyze the effects on audit quality as well as economic tradeoffs related to partner tenure and rotation with respect to audit hours and fees. On average, we find no evidence for audit quality declines over the tenure cycle and little support for fresh-look benefits after rotations. Nevertheless, partner rotations have significant economic consequences. We find increases in audit fees and decreases in audit hours over the tenure cycle, which differ by partner experience, client size, and competitiveness of the local audit market. More generally, our findings are consistent with efforts by the audit firms to minimize disruptions and audit failures around mandatory rotations. We also analyze special circumstances, such as audit firm switches and early partner rotations, and show that they are more disruptive than mandatory rotations, and also more likely to exhibit audit quality effects
The effect of regulatory harmonization on cross-border labor migration evidence from the accounting profession by Matthew J Bloomfield( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The paper examines whether international regulatory harmonization increases cross-border labor migration. To study this question, we analyze European Union (EU) initiatives that harmonized accounting and auditing standards. Regulatory harmonization should reduce economic mobility barriers, essentially making it easier for accounting professionals to move across countries. Our research design compares the cross-border migration of accounting professionals relative to tightly-matched other professionals before and after regulatory harmonization. We find that international labor migration in the accounting profession increases significantly relative to other professions. We provide evidence that this effect is due to harmonization, rather than increases in the demand for accounting services during the implementation of the rule changes. The findings illustrate that diversity in rules constitutes an economic barrier to cross-border labor mobility and, more specifically, that accounting harmonization can have a meaningful effect on cross-border migration
Public Audit Oversight and Reporting Credibility Evidence from the PCAOB Inspection Regime by Brandon Gipper( )

4 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines how audit oversight by a public-sector regulator affects investors' assessments of reporting credibility. We analyze whether the introduction of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) and its inspection regime have strengthened capital-market responses to unexpected earnings releases, as theory predicts when reporting credibility increases. To identify the effects, we use a difference-in-differences design that exploits the staggered introduction of the inspection regime, which affects firms at different points in time depending on their fiscal year-ends, auditors, and the timing of PCAOB inspections. We find that capital-market responses to unexpected earnings increase significantly following the introduction of the PCAOB inspection regime. Corroborating these findings, we also find an increase in abnormal volume responses to firms' 10-K filings after the new regime. Overall, our results are consistent with public audit oversight increasing the credibility of financial reporting
Who falls prey to the wolf of Wall Street? : Investor participation in market manipulation by Christian Leuz( )

4 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Manipulative communications touting stocks are common in capital markets around the world. Although the price distortions created by so-called "pump-and-dump" schemes are well known, little is known about the investors in these frauds. By examining 421 "pump-and-dump" schemes between 2002 and 2015 and a proprietary set of trading records for over 110,000 individual investors from a major German bank, we provide evidence on the participation rate, magnitude of the investments, losses, and the characteristics of the individuals who invest in such schemes. Our evidence suggests that participation is quite common and involves sizable losses, with nearly 6% of active investors participating in at least one "pump-and-dump" and an average loss of nearly 30%. Moreover, we identify several distinct types of investors, some of which should not be viewed as falling prey to these frauds. We also show that portfolio composition and past trading behavior can better explain participation in touted stocks than demographics. Our analysis offers insights into the challenges associated with designing effective investor protection against market manipulation
Rechnungslegung und Kreditfinanzierung : zum Zusammenhang von Ausschüttungsbegrenzung, bilanzieller Gewinnermittlung und vorsichtiger Rechnungslegung by Christian Leuz( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in German and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The death of a regulator : strict supervision, bank lending and business activity by João Granja( )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An important question in banking is how strict supervision affects bank lending and in turn local business activity. Forcing banks to recognize losses could choke off lending and amplify local economic woes, especially after financial crises. But stricter supervision could also lead to changes in how banks assess loans and manage their loan portfolios. Estimating such effects is challenging. We exploit the extinction of the thrift regulator (OTS) – a large change in prudential supervision, affecting ten percent of all U.S. depository institutions. Using this event, we analyze economic links between strict supervision, bank lending and business activity. We first show that the OTS replacement indeed resulted in stricter supervision of former OTS banks. We then analyze the lending effects of this regulatory change and show that former OTS banks increase small business lending by approximately 10 percent. This increase stems primarily from well-capitalized banks and those more affected by the new regime. These findings suggest that stricter supervision operates not only through capital but can also overcome frictions in bank management, leading to more lending and a reallocation of loans. Consistent with the latter, we find increases in business entry and exit in counties with greater expose to OTS banks
Evidence-Based Policymaking : Promise, Challenges and Opportunities for Accounting and Financial Markets Research by Christian Leuz( )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The use of evidence and economic analysis in policymaking is on the rise, and accounting standard setting and financial regulation are no exception. This article discusses the promise of evidence-based policymaking in accounting and financial markets as well as the challenges and opportunities for research supporting this endeavor. In principle, using sound theory and robust empirical evidence should lead to better policies and regulations. But despite its obvious appeal and substantial promise, evidence-based policymaking is easier demanded than done. It faces many challenges related to the difficulty of providing relevant causal evidence, lack of data, the reliability of published research, and the transmission of research findings. Overcoming these challenges requires substantial infrastructure investments for generating and disseminating relevant research. To illustrate this point, I draw parallels to the rise of evidence-based medicine. The article provides several concrete suggestions for the research process and the aggregation of research findings that could be considered if scientific evidence is to inform policymaking. I discuss how policymakers can foster and support policy-relevant research, chiefly by providing and generating data. The article also points to potential pitfalls when research becomes increasingly policy-oriented
The crisis of fair value accounting making sense of the recent debate by Christian Laux( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recent financial crisis has led to a vigorous debate about the pros and cons of fair-value accounting (FVA). This debate presents a major challenge for FVA going forward and standard setters' push to extend FVA into other areas. In this article, we highlight four important issues as an attempt to make sense of the debate. First, much of the controversy results from confusion about what is new and different about FVA. Second, while there are legitimate concerns about marking to market (or pure FVA) in times of financial crisis, it is less clear that these problems apply to FVA as stipulated by the accounting standards, be it IFRS or U.S. GAAP. Third, historical cost accounting (HCA) is unlikely to be the remedy. There are a number of concerns about HCA as well and these problems could be larger than those with FVA. Fourth, although it is difficult to fault the FVA standards per se, implementation issues are a potential concern, especially with respect to litigation. Finally, we identify several avenues for future research. JEL Classification: G14, G15, G30, K22, M41, M42
Did fair-value accounting contribute to the financial crisis? by Christian Laux( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recent financial crisis has led to a major debate about fair-value accounting. Many critics have argued that fair-value accounting, often also called mark-to-market accounting, has significantly contributed to the financial crisis or, at least, exacerbated its severity. In this paper, we assess these arguments and examine the role of fair-value accounting in the financial crisis using descriptive data and empirical evidence. Based on our analysis, it is unlikely that fair-value accounting added to the severity of the current financial crisis in a major way. While there may have been downward spirals or asset-fire sales in certain markets, we find little evidence that these effects are the result of fair-value accounting. We also find little support for claims that fair-value accounting leads to excessive write-downs of banks' assets. If anything, empirical evidence to date points in the opposite direction, that is, towards overvaluation of bank assets. JEL-Classifications: G14, G15, G30, K22, M41, M42
Eurobonds zur Bewältigung der europäischen Krise? Wegweisung zu einer modernen Entwicklungsunion( )

1 edition published in 2011 in German and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Die aktuelle Debatte um den Umgang mit der Verschuldung Griechenlands und anderer EWU Staaten berührt die Grundlagen europäischer Wirtschaftspolitik. Die nächsten Schritte sind wohl abzuwägen, um über eine unmittelbare Kriseneindämmung hinaus eine langfristige Stabilisierung der wirtschaftlichen und politischen Strukturen in der Eurozone zu erreichen. Eine funktionsfähige Wirtschafts- und Währungsunion hat ihren Preis. Sie ist aber auch von großem Nutzen, gerade für Deutschland und die wettbewerbsstarken Regionen, die insbesondere vom einheitlichen Binnenmarkt und der monetären Stabilität profitieren. Das rechtfertigt zugleich eine Unterstützung ökonomisch schwächerer Mitglieder der Union durch die stärkeren. Historisch waren Währungsunionen ohne einen derartigen minimalen fiskalischen Ausgleich nicht dauerhaft. Deshalb sind, wenn man die Währungsunion aufrechterhalten will, zwei Extrempositionen - keine Transfers, um keinen Preis ebenso wie deren Gegenteil: jedwedes Defizit wird bedingungslos finanziert - nicht zielführend. Ein kompletter Haftungsausschluss (no bail-out) ist nicht glaubwürdig, solange unabweisbare Schuldenschnitte von insolventen Staaten oder Regionen (wegen Überschuldung) nicht möglich sind, weil sie innerhalb eines stark integrierten Bankenmarktes potentiell unkontrollierbare Rückwirkungen auslösen. Andererseits liefe die unkonditionierte, dauerhafte Finanzierung regionaler Ungleichgewichte auf Transfervolumina hinaus, die eine Überforderung der Transfergeber darstellten. Sie führte vor allem zu einer Perpetuierung der Probleme, weil Anreize zur letztlich unabdingbaren Anpassung fehlten. Damit bleiben zur Schaffung der Voraussetzungen einer funktionsfähigen Währungsunion nur Optionen, die zwischen den Polen liegen
The role of accounting in the German financial system( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This chapter analyzes the role of financial accounting in the German financial system. It starts from the common perception that German accounting is rather "uninformative". This characterization is appropriate from the perspective of an arm's length or outside investor and when confined to the financial statements per se. But it is no longer accurate when a broader perspective is adopted. The German accounting system exhibits several arrangements that privately communicate information to insiders, notably the supervisory board. Due to these features, the key financing and contracting parties seem reasonably well informed. The same cannot be said about outside investors relying primarily on public disclosure. A descriptive analysis of the main elements of the Germany system and a survey of extant empirical accounting research generally support these arguments. Klassifikation: M41, G3, D82, K0
Voluntary disclosure of cash flow statements and segment data in Germany by Christian Leuz( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

IAS versus US GAAP : a "new market" based comparison by Christian Leuz( Book )

3 editions published between 2000 and 2003 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The economic consequences of increased disclosure by Christian Leuz( Book )

4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The economics and politics of accounting : international perspectives on research, trends, policy, and practice
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Alternative Names
Leuz, C. 1967-

Languages
English (113)

German (5)