WorldCat Identities

Tarlow, Sarah 1967-

Overview
Works: 28 works in 126 publications in 1 language and 4,247 library holdings
Genres: History  Conference papers and proceedings  Genealogy 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Sarah Tarlow
The familiar past? : archaeologies of later historical Britain by Sarah Tarlow( )

12 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and held by 1,411 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume surveys material culture from 1550 to the present day. Fourteen case studies, grouped under related topics, include discussion of issues such as the origins of modernity in urban contexts
The archaeology of improvement in Britain, 1750-1850 by Sarah Tarlow( )

14 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and held by 578 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this innovative study, Sarah Tarlow shows how the archaeology of this period manifests a widespread and cross-cutting ethic of improvement, one of the most current concepts of eighteenth and nineteenth century Britain. Theoretically informed and drawn from primary and secondary sources in a range of disciplines, the author considers agriculture and the rural environment, towns, and buildings such as working-class housing and institutions of reform. From bleach baths to window glass, rubbish pits to tea wares, the material culture of the period reflects a particular set of values and aspirations. Tarlow examines the philosophical and historical background to the notion of improvement and demonstrates how this concept is a useful lens through which to examine the material culture of later historical Britain."--BOOK JACKET
The archaeology of death in post-medieval Europe by Sarah Tarlow( )

11 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 413 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume offers a range of case studies and reflections on aspects of death and burial in post-medieval Europe
Bereavement and commemoration : an archaeology of mortality by Sarah Tarlow( Book )

8 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 354 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this book, Sarah Tarlow provides an innovative archaeology of bereavement, mortality and memory in the early modern and modern period. She draws on literary and historical sources as well as on material evidence to examine the evolution of attitudes towards death and commemoration over four centuries."--Jacket
Ritual, belief, and the dead in early modern Britain and Ireland by Sarah Tarlow( Book )

20 editions published between 2010 and 2013 in English and held by 347 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Drawing on archaeological, historical, theological, scientific, and folkloric sources, Sarah Tarlow's interdisciplinary study examines belief as it relates to the dead body in early modern Britain and Ireland. From the theological discussion of bodily resurrection to the folkloric use of body parts as remedies, and from the judicial punishment of the corpse to the ceremonial interment of the social elite, this book discusses how seemingly incompatible beliefs about the dead body existed in parallel through this tumultuous period. This study, which is the first to incorporate archaeological evidence of early modern death and burial from across Britain and Ireland, addresses new questions about the materiality of death: what the dead body means, and how its physical substance could be attributed with sentience and even agency. It provides a sophisticated original interpretive framework for the growing quantities of archaeological and historical evidence about mortuary beliefs and practices in early modernity"--Provided by publisher
The Oxford handbook of the archaeology of death and burial( Book )

13 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 342 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The archaeology of death and burial provides a privileged source of insight into the lives of people in the past. This kind of archaeological feature commonly includes the material remains of the dead, containing biological information of age, sex, pathologies, DNA profiles, and isotopic signals of diet and migration. The analysis of burials also provides archaeological information about how the dead were treated as part of the mortuary ritual, which gives the archaeologist insight into ritual practice, belief, and emotional responses to death, and also speaks more generally about social relationships among the living including identity, gender, and social rank. This volume offers an introduction to all these dimensions of the archaeology of death and burial. Contributions range from historical overviews of several different significant traditions relating to burials in the history of the discipline of archaeology. Other chapters examine recent methodologies to retrieve and analyse biological information, and contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of central issues in our discipline such as the body, identity, gender, emotion, religion, and ritual. The volume has an international profile with contributions from leading scholars around the world, providing case studies from a range of different cultural contexts. The volume also recognizes the central place of ethical considerations in the excavation, analysis, and exhibition of human remains and ritual artefacts, and provides different perspectives on the ethical implications for any archaeologist working with this kind of material. -- Publisher website
The golden and ghoulish age of the gibbet in Britain by Sarah Tarlow( )

9 editions published between 2015 and 2018 in English and Undetermined and held by 283 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is published open access under a CC BY 4.0 licence. This book is the first academic study of the post-mortem practice of gibbeting ('hanging in chains'), since the nineteenth century. Gibbeting involved placing the executed body of a malefactor in an iron cage and suspending it from a tall post. A body might remain in the gibbet for many decades, while it gradually fell to pieces. Hanging in chains was a very different sort of post-mortem punishment from anatomical dissection, although the two were equal alternatives in the eyes of the law. Where dissection obliterated and de-individualised the body, hanging in chains made it monumental and rooted it in the landscape, adding to personal notoriety. Focusing particularly on the period 1752-1832, this book provides a summary of the historical evidence, the factual history of gibbetting which explores the locations of gibbets, the material technologies involved in hanging in chains, and the actual process from erection to eventual collapse. It also considers the meanings, effects and legacy of this gruesome practice."--
Thinking through the body : archaeologies of corporeality by Yannis Hamilakis( Book )

11 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is the archaeology of the body and how can it change the way we experience the past? This book records and evaluates the emergence of this direction of cross-disciplinary research, and examines the potential of incorporating some of its insights into archaeology
Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse by Sarah Tarlow( )

4 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This open access book is the culmination of many years of research on what happened to the bodies of executed criminals in the past. Focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it looks at the consequences of the 1752 Murder Act. These criminal bodies had a crucial role in the history of medicine, and the history of crime, and great symbolic resonance in literature and popular culture. Starting with a consideration of the criminal corpse in the medieval and early modern periods, chapters go on to review the histories of criminal justice, of medical history and of gibbeting under the Murder Act, and ends with some discussion of the afterlives of the corpse, in literature, folklore and in contemporary medical ethics. Using sophisticated insights from cultural history, archaeology, literature, philosophy and ethics as well as medical and crime history, this book is a uniquely interdisciplinary take on a fascinating historical phenomenon."--
A fine and private place : the archaeology of death and burial in post-medieval Britain and Ireland by Annia Cherryson( Book )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The familiar past? : Archaeologies of Britain 1550-1950 by Sarah Tarlow( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A fine and private place : the archaeology of death and burial in post-medieval Britain and Ireland by Annia Cherryson( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The archaeology of emotion and affect by Sarah Tarlow( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Emotion in archaeology by Sarah Tarlow( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bead exchange among the historic Kumeyaay Indians by Alexander Neal Kirkish( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The focus of my research is to describe, analyze, and explain the unusual spike in the number of shell and glass beads at selected Kumeyaay sites in San Diego County during the Historic Period. The reasons for this apparent increase in bead use are problematic, but one explanation is the profound impact of Spanish colonial presence on Native populations and the resultant sociocultural transformations made by indigenous groups. I demonstrate that the demographic disruption ensuing from the Spanish incursion led to a revitalization movement which dispersed from the greater Los Angeles area to the inland areas of southern California. Called the Chingichngish cult, the new religion melded traditional ceremonial life with a new set of rituals. This new ceremonialism was infused with the intensive use of beads, and it is likely that this created the exponential appearance of larger numbers of Class H beads at numerous inland historic sites in the region. Using archaeological and historical data, I show that the beads analyzed in the various collections were tied to various exchange networks which operated over extant trails and travel corridors and that Class H shell beads were inextricably tied to the new religion. The vastly greater number of these beads at inland Kumeyaay sites is likely the result of intensified on-site ritualism and the concomitant increase in bead exchange
The style of Quaker consumption in British Colonial New Jersey : the link between religious beliefs and values and the archaeological record of the Society of Friends by Michael L Young( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This research focuses on the role of beliefs and values at domestic Quaker sites in British Colonial North America and their transformations through time. Evidence is drawn from building techniques, ceramic and glass tablewares, foodways as manifest through storage/preparation vessels and faunal remains, alcohol and tobacco-related objects, and materials related to dress and personal adornment. The aim of this research is to make substantial contributions to the study of Quakers, to the study of the influence of beliefs and values in colonial situations and past cultural traditions in general, and to the study of the rise and spread of eighteenth-century consumerism associated with the Industrial Revolution
Curious afterlives: the enduring appeal of the criminal corpse( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Not only did the criminal corpse have actual medicinal and magical power for Europeans, it also had social and cultural meaning as an object, a curio or secular relic. This paper considers the appeal of notorious bodies. From books bound in the skin of a criminal, to preserved and exhibited heads, from fragments of the hangman's rope to the exhibition of the skeleton, the story of the afterlife of criminal bodies and the material culture most immediately associated with them begins with the collection and exchange of bodies and moves into contemporary preoccupations with authenticity. This paper considers the bodies of three notorious criminals of the eighteenth century: Eugene Aram, William Burke and William Corder. It ends with some reflections on the glamour of the authentic body of a notorious or celebrated individual - using the response to the discovery of the body of Richard III as an example
The oldest alliance : a material exploration of early modern English-Portuguese relationships by Sarah Rose Newstead( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Monumental inscriptions in St Andrews by Leslie Foubister( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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The familiar past? : archaeologies of later historical Britain The familiar past? : Archaeologies of Britain 1550-1950
Covers
The archaeology of improvement in Britain, 1750-1850Bereavement and commemoration : an archaeology of mortalityRitual, belief, and the dead in early modern Britain and IrelandThinking through the body : archaeologies of corporealityThe familiar past? : Archaeologies of Britain 1550-1950
Alternative Names
Tarlow, Sarah Alexandra 1967-

Languages
English (117)