WorldCat Identities

Trout, Dennis E. 1953-

Overview
Works: 14 works in 42 publications in 3 languages and 2,221 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Records and correspondence  Biography  History  Church history  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Translator, Thesis advisor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Dennis E Trout
Paulinus of Nola : life, letters, and poems by Dennis E Trout( )

16 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 1,998 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Born to a provincial family of wealth, status, and privilege (ca. 353) in Roman Gaul, Meropius Pontius Paulinus entered upon the career of a Roman officeholder to which this birth virtually entitled him. It was after he had returned from this Italian service to his ancestral estates that he encountered Martin of Tours and embarked upon an earnest review of the world and his place in it, leading to his receiving Christian baptism. His subsequent withdrawal to Spain (ca. 389) culminated in his remarkable renunciation of the world and his dedication to an ascetic monasticism for which there were as yet very few avatars in the western Roman provinces
Damasus of Rome : the epigraphic poetry : introduction, texts, translations, and commentary by Damasus( Book )

7 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Damasus of Rome makes available in English the epigraphic poetry of Damasus, bishop of Rome from 366 to 384. A full introduction situates Damasus in his times by considering his troubled election and the issues that dominated Rome and his papacy. The introduction also sets the poems within the broader sweep of the history of epigraphic poetry at Rome and relates them both to the development of the Christian catacombs and to the emergence of the cults of the Roman saints. Modern scholarship readily acknowledges that the years of Damasus' episcopacy were pivotal ones in the transformation of Rome into a late antique Christian city. His poetry, much of it inscribed at the suburban tombs of the Roman saints and martyrs, played an incalculable but significant role in the redefinition of both Roman and Christian identity in this remarkable age."--Back cover
Paulinus of Nola : life, letters, and poems by Dennis E Trout( Book )

2 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Secular renunciation and social action : Paulinus of Nola and late Roman society by Dennis E Trout( )

6 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and Undetermined and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The epigraphic poetry : introduction, texts, translations, and commentary by Damasus( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in Latin and English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Damasus of Rome makes available in English the epigraphic poetry of Damasus, bishop of Rome from 366 to 384. A full introduction situates Damasus in his times by considering his troubled election and the issues that dominated Rome and his papacy. The introduction also sets the poems within the broader sweep of the history of epigraphic poetry at Rome and relates them both to the development of the Christian catacombs and to the emergence of the cults of the Roman saints. Modern scholarship readily acknowledges that the years of Damasus' episcopacy were pivotal ones in the transformation of Rome into a late antique Christian city. His poetry, much of it inscribed at the suburban tombs of the Roman saints and martyrs, played an incalculable but significant role in the redefinition of both Roman and Christian identity in this remarkable age
Paulinus of Nola life, letters, and poems by Dennis E Trout( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cimitile, Nola, and the transformation of the city in late antiquity by Dennis E Trout( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The directed gaze : enargeia and film in the Annales of Tacitus by Philip Waddell( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

My aim in this study is to examine the visual aspects of Tacitus' Annales in order to elucidate his creation of vivid narrative through control of the directed gaze. Examples of Tacitean visuality are examined through the dual lenses of ancient Roman art and modern cinematography. The visual qualities of Tacitus' historiography are clarified through the contexts provided by both Roman art and modern film. In the first chapter, I discuss relevant Tacitean scholarship that pertains to the question of veracity and historiography. In the next two chapters, I examine point of view, considering its constituent elements: focalization and voice. During the following three chapters, themes of transition and temporality are discussed. In the final part of the dissertation, chapter 7, I investigate the ways in which Tacitus provides his reader the key to understanding his secret history, by decoding silent gazes and showing the invisible. Through this dissertation, I hope to show that the Annales cannot be understood fully without an appreciation of the visual artistry of Tacitus
The growth of a church seasoned by the growth of a man : the Reverend Dr. Charles E. Kistler by Dennis E Trout( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Paulinus of Nola: Life, Letters, and Poems (The transformation of the classical heritage ; 27) by Dennis E Trout( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Remembering Trajan in fourth-century Rome : memory and identity in spatial, artistic, and textual narratives by Eric M Thienes( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this study I examine how fourth-century authors, senators, and emperors used, memorialized, and emulated the emperor Trajan (98–117 CE) from the time of Constantine to the Theodosians. More importantly, I prove that the figure of Trajan was selected in order to signal narratives of cultural renewal for the senatorial aristocracy and emperors seeking to establish their cultural identity. Rather than reading Trajan as an artifact of history, this study is about the processes of social memory in the context of space, art, and text through which Trajan is used to tell a story. Trajan’s career made a substantial impact on Rome, and he was important for fourth-century Romans who wanted to connect the fourth century to the second century indicating the fulfilment of the “Age of Restoration.” Therefore, Trajan was an exemplum invoked by elites in order to praise or critique his imperial successors. His monuments were used and copied by emperors in order to project an identity of familial heritage and military distinction. He also served the narrative of Christian authors, who were establishing their history in the fourth century and viewed Trajan as having a reasonable policy towards Christians. This study applies theories of social and public memory and uses them to examine fourth-century Roman society. The first chapter specifies terminology and lays out historical background for Trajan. In the second chapter, I study the use and function of Trajanic monuments and art in Rome as evidence for the perpetuation of Trajan’s legacy for the capital. Likewise, I demonstrate that the incorporation of Trajan into new art and space established a connection with him–the Arch of Constantine being a prime example. In addition, Trajan’s Forum was singularly the most important space for commemorating members of the senatorial aristocracy with statues and inscriptions, which unified the new social class. In the third chapter, I survey fourth-century literature, specifically histories (Ammianus Marcellinus, Festus, and Eutropius), biographies (the Historia Augusta, Aurelius Victor, Epitome de Caesaribus, Julian, and Ausonius), and panegyrics (the Panegyrici Latini, Claudian, and Sidonius Apollinaris) to observe how Roman elites of this period treated Trajan and used the memory of his tradition to form written narratives to praise or critique past and current emperors. In the final chapter, I explore Trajan’s legacy as it was received by Christian authors seeking to write the history of the church. From the Christian point of view, Trajan was problematic because of his paradoxical response to Christian practice. Eusebius, writing in the fourth century, is the foremost author to establish the canonical historical interpretation of Trajan. Eusebius’ Trajan is regarded as a virtuous emperor, who decreases Christian persecution across the empire. Subsequent authors, Orosius, Jerome, and Sulpicius Severus, for example, maintain the “Eusebian version” of Trajan, setting up Trajan to be an exemplary “noble pagan.” By the time of Gregory the Great, tradition arose that Trajan was posthumously baptized by the pope’s tears and released from Hades. Trajan, an exemplar in his own right, served the needs of later Romans telling their own story
Augustine at Cassiciacum : otium honestum and the social dimensions of conversion by Dennis E Trout( )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Augustine by Dennis E Trout( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Paulinus of Nola : life, letters, and poems Paulinus of Nola : life, letters, and poems
Covers
Paulinus of Nola : life, letters, and poems
Alternative Names
Trout, Dennis

Trout Dennis 1953-....

Trout, Dennis E.

Trout, Dennis E. (Dennis Elwood)

Languages
English (39)

Latin (1)

German (1)