WorldCat Identities

Flint, Lorraine E.

Overview
Works: 22 works in 30 publications in 1 language and 1,729 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: GB701, 553.7097
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Lorraine E Flint
Water-quality data from 2002 to 2003 and analysis of data gaps for development of total maximum daily loads in the lower Klamath River basin, California( )

3 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional analysis of ground-water recharge by Lorraine E Flint( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 260 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simulation of net infiltration and potential recharge using a distributed-parameter watershed model of the Death Valley region, Nevada and California by Joseph A Hevesi( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 226 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Characterization of hydrogeologic units using matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 207 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge for the Death Valley Region, Nevada-California by Joseph A Hevesi( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shallow infiltration processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada : neutron logging data 1984-93 by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physical and hydrologic properties of rock outcrop samples at Yucca Mountain, Nevada( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stratigraphic relations and hydrologic properties of the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded (PTn) hydrologic unit, Yucca Mountain, Nevada by Thomas C Moyer( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preliminary permeability and water-retention data for nonwelded and bedded tuff samples, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 122 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physical and hydrologic properties of rock outcrop samples at Yucca Mountain, Nevada( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stratigraphic relations and hydrologic properties of the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded (PTn) hydrologic unit, Yucca Mountain, Nevada by Thomas C Moyer( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Modeling soil moisture processes and recharge under a melting snowpack by Alan L Flint( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Characterization of unsaturated zone hydrologic properties and their influence on lateral diversion in a volcanic tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study of the subsurface flow and distribution of water is critical to the evaluation of the unsaturated zone for a potential geologic high-level radioactive waste repository. This site is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada in the northern Mojave Desert. and was chosen on the basis of its low precipitation, deep unsaturated zone, and layered volcanic rocks providing the potential for natural hydraulic barriers to reduce the downward percolation of water through the waste storage area. The detailed characterization of hydrologic properties is necessary to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for the distribution and flow of water in the unsaturated zone. Analyses in this study have provided detailed hydrogeologic units with unique hydrologic properties and hydraulic parameters. Porosity was determined to be a useful physical property for predicting hydraulic parameters, as it relates to the largescale deterministic processes that created the volcanic rocks. The detailed property dataset, along with field measurements of moisture status, temperature, and chemistry, were used to evaluate the potential for lateral diversion in the rocks above the potential repository. It was determined that lateral diversion is a small-scale process in this natural system. On the basis of analyses performed in this study, it is suggested that large-scale diversion is not likely to occur at this site. This mechanism should not, therefore, be relied upon to perform as a natural hydraulic barrier to flow reducing percolation through the unsaturated zone
Preliminary estimates of spatially distributed net infiltration and recharge for the Death Valley region, Nevada-California by Joseph A Hevesi( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Assessing geomorphic change along the Trinity River downstream from Lewiston Dam, California, 1980 to 2011 by Jennifer A Curtis( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Erosion of refugia in the Sierra Nevada meadows network with climate change( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Climate refugia management has been proposed as a climate adaptation strategy in the face of global change. Key to this strategy is identification of these areas as well as an understanding of how they are connected on the landscape. Focusing on meadows of the Sierra Nevada in California, we examined multiple factors affecting connectivity using circuit theory, and determined how patches have been and are expected to be affected by climate change. Connectivity surfaces varied depending upon the underlying hypothesis, although meadow area and elevation were important features for higher connectivity. Climate refugia that would promote population persistence were identified from downscaled climate layers, based on locations with minimal climatic change from historical conditions. This approach was agnostic to specific species, yielding a broad perspective about changes and localized habitats. Connectivity was not a consistent predictor of refugial status in the 20th century, but expected future climate refugia tended to have higher connectivity than those that recently deviated from historical conditions. Climate change is projected to reduce the number of refugial meadows on a variety of climate axes, resulting in a sparser network of potential refugia across elevations. Our approach provides a straightforward method that can be used as a tool to prioritize places for climate adaptation
Effects of soil surface shading, mulching and vegetation control on Douglas-fir seedling growth and microsite water partitioning by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A two year study with 500 seedlings was conducted in the harsh, drought prone southwest Oregon environment to assess the effects of 12 soil surface shading, mulching and vegetation control techniques on soil temperature and moisture environments and seedling growth. Treatments modified, to various degrees, soil surface temperatures, reduced soil surface evaporation and reduced vegetative competition for water in the seedling root zone. These modified conditions affected seedlings by reducing soil water loss to increase water available for seedling use and adjusting the timing of seedling growth. Seedlings in treatments where competing vegetation was removed had significantly larger final shoot volumes and stem diameters. Soil water loss was significantly less in treatments where soil surface evaporation was controlled by mulching or controlling competing vegetation. Shaded and control treatments used the most water over the season. Soil water loss in treatments with vegetation controlled by herbicide was significantly less than those with vegetation control by scalping which disturbs the soil surface by removing the loose soil and duff layer. Therefore, seedlings grew the most with treatments that elicited the most efficient use of available microsite water either by reducing soil surface evaporation or vegetative competition. Transpiration data supported these conclusions by showing more than twice the water was transpired by competing vegetative species per unit leaf area than by seedlings. In addition, estimates of percent cover by seedlings and all vegetative species occupying the site showed competing vegetation to cover 78.6% of the site compared to 2.4% cover by the seedlings. This illustrates the degree of competition the vegetation gives to the seedling over the whole site even in an environment where water is a limiting resource
Characterization of hydrogeologic units using matrix properties, Yucca Mountain, Nevada by Lorraine E Flint( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impact of climate change uncertainty on California's vegetation and adaptation management( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The impacts of different emission levels and climate change conditions to landscape-scale natural vegetation could have large repercussions for ecosystem services and environmental health. We forecast the risk-reduction benefits to natural landscapes of lowering business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions by comparing the extent and spatial patterns of climate exposure to dominant vegetation under current emissions trajectories (Representative Concentration Pathway, RCP8.5) and envisioned Paris Accord target emissions (RCP4.5). This comparison allows us to assess the ecosystem value of reaching targets to keep global temperature warming under 2°C. Using 350, 719km 2 of natural lands in California, USA, and the mapped extents of 30 vegetation types, we identify each type's current bioclimatic envelope by the frequency with which it occupies current climate conditions. We then map the trajectory of each pixel's climate under the four climate futures to quantify areas expected to fall within, become marginal to(outside a 95% probability contour), or move beyond their current climate conditions by the end of the 21st century. In California, these four future climates represent temperature increases of 1.9-4.5°C and a −24.8 to+22.9% change in annual precipitation by 2100. From 158, 481 to 196, 493 km 2 (45-56%) of California's natural vegetation is predicted to become highly climatically stressed under current emission levels (RCP8.5) under the drier and wetter global climate models, respectively. Vegetation in three California ecoregions critical to human welfare, southwestern CA, the Great Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, becomes >50% impacted, including 68% of the lands around Los Angeles and San Diego. However, reducing emissions to RCP4.5 levels reduces statewide climate exposure risk by 86, 382-99, 726km 2 . These projections are conservative baseline estimates because they do not account for amplified drought-related mortality, fires, and beetle outbreaks that have been observed during the current five-year drought. However, these results point to the landscape benefits of emission reductions
 
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Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.10 for Characteri ... to 0.88 for Erosion of ...)

Languages
English (28)