WorldCat Identities

Mansoor, Peter R. 1960-

Overview
Works: 26 works in 84 publications in 1 language and 5,084 library holdings
Genres: History  Personal narratives‡vAmerican  Personal narratives  Juvenile works  Literature  Military history  Case studies  Academic theses  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: DS79.76, 956.7044342092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Peter R Mansoor
Baghdad at sunrise : a Brigade Commander's war in Iraq by Peter R Mansoor( )

10 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 2,002 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An on-the-ground commander describes his brigade's first year in Iraq after the U.S. forces seized Baghdad in the spring of 2003, and explains what went right and wrong as the U.S. military confronted an insurgency, in a firsthand analysis of success and failure in Iraq
Surge : my journey with General David Petraeus and the remaking of the Iraq War by Peter R Mansoor( )

15 editions published between 2013 and 2015 in English and held by 1,485 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using newly declassified documents, unpublished manuscripts, interviews, author notes, and published sources, Surge explains how President George W. Bush, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, Ambassador Crocker, General Petraeus, and other U.S. and Iraqi political and military leaders shaped the surge from the center of the maelstrom in Baghdad and Washington."--Pub. desc
The GI offensive in Europe : the triumph of American infantry divisions, 1941-1945 by Peter R Mansoor( Book )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 789 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book provides a comprehensive study of America's infantry combat performance in Europe during World War II, showing that the Army succeeded by developing combat effective divisions that could not only fight and win battles but also sustain that effort over years of combat. While American industry admittedly enabled the United States to sustain its overseas armies, the effectiveness of those forces ultimately rested on their organizational capabilities and ability to adapt to combat in a variety of lethal environments and to learn from their mistakes. Mansoor also takes a close look at the personalities and capabilities of division commanders, infantry tactics and operations, logistics, and the benefits and weaknesses of stateside training
Hybrid warfare : fighting complex opponents from the ancient world to the present by Williamson Murray( )

12 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 348 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hybrid warfare has been an integral part of the historical landscape since the ancient world, but only recently have analysts, incorrectly, categorized these conflicts as unique. Great powers throughout history have confronted opponents who used a combination of regular and irregular forces to negate the advantage of the great powers' superior conventional military strength. As this study shows, hybrid wars are labor-intensive and long-term affairs; they are difficult struggles that defy the domestic logic of opinion polls and election cycles. Hybrid wars are also the most likely conflicts of the twenty-first century, as competitors use hybrid forces to wear down America's military capabilities in extended campaigns of exhaustion. Nine historical examples of hybrid warfare, from ancient Rome to the modern world, provide readers with context by clarifying the various aspects of conflicts and examining how great powers have dealt with them in the past
Grand strategy and military alliances( )

11 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 210 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Alliances have shaped grand strategy and warfare since the dawn of civilization. Indeed, it is doubtful that the United States of America would have gained its independence without its Revolutionary War alliance with France. Such alliances may prove even more important to international security in the twenty-first century. Economic and financial difficulties alone will ensure that policy makers attempt to spread the burden of securing vital interests onto other nations through alliances, both formal organizations such as NATO and informal alliances of convenience as developed to wage the Gulf War in 1991. A team of leading historians examine the problems inherent in alliance politics and relationships in the framework of grand strategy through the lens of history. Aimed at not just the military aspects of alliances, the book uncovers the myriad factors that have made such coalitions succeed or fail in the past"--
The turn of the tide in the Pacific war : strategic initiative, intelligence, and command, 1941-1943 by Sean M Judge( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The D-Day Invasion of Normandy by Michael Capek( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This title examines the invasion of Normandy during World War II, focusing on the planning, the equipment, and the brave soldiers who ensured an Allied victory."--Publisher's website
Building Blocks of Victory : American Infantry Divisions in the War Against Germany and Italy, 1941-1945 by Peter R Mansoor( )

5 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many recent historians have claimed that American infantry divisions that fought in Europe during World War II prevailed only because the Allies out-produced Germany in an industrial war of attrition. This work contends that these historians have underrated the fighting capabilities of American infantry divisions in World War II. Due to decisions on allocation of resources made early in the war, such as the overall number of ground combat forces to be mobilized and the distribution of quality manpower to the various arms and services, American infantry divisions operated with severe handicaps. Given the resource constraints under which it operated, however, the Army of the United States did a credible job in developing the large number of combat formations required to fight a global war. The most important limitation by far was time. Shortages of equipment, lack of training facilities, and scarcity of experienced leaders plagued the Army during its mobilization due to the late entry of the United States into World War II. As a result of this turmoil, new divisions took a longer time to organize and train than called for by the mobilization training plan. Manpower shortages also eventually forced the War Department to scale back the number of divisions it activated to eighty-nine. Shortages of combat divisions in Europe forced commanders to rely on a continuous stream of individual replacements to keep their units at full strength. The need for replacements forced the War Department to strip men from divisions in training to fill the depleted ranks of divisions in combat, a practice which disrupted the cohesiveness of many divisions not yet deployed overseas. Despite these drawbacks, the process of creating new divisions was sound. Overseas, American infantry divisions proved resilient, flexible, and capable of adapting to a variety of combat environments. They became the foundation upon which Allied commanders built the successful campaigns in western Europe in 1944-45
Hybrid Warfare( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hybrid warfare has been an integral part of the historical landscape since the ancient world, but only recently have analysts - incorrectly - categorised these conflicts as unique. Great powers throughout history have confronted opponents who used a combination of regular and irregular forces to negate the advantage of the great powers' superior conventional military strength. As this study shows, hybrid wars are labour-intensive and long-term affairs; they are difficult struggles that defy the domestic logic of opinion polls and election cycles. Hybrid wars are also the most likely conflicts of the twenty-first century, as competitors use hybrid forces to wear down America's military capabilities in extended campaigns of exhaustion. Nine historical examples of hybrid warfare, from ancient Rome to the modern world, provide readers with context by clarifying the various aspects of conflicts and examining how great powers have dealt with them in the past
The culture of military organizations( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Surge by Peter R Mansoor( Recording )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The US Army by Mary K Pratt( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This title highlights the history and achievements of the US Army. Text explores the military branch's key missions and important roles in protecting the United States. Learn about cutting-edge technology and weapons, and discover what it is like to join the US Army and have a career as a soldier
Baghdad at sunrise : a brigade commander's war in Iraq by Peter R Mansoor( Visual )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Baghdad at Sunrise presents an unparalleled record of what happened after U.S. forces seized Baghdad in the spring of 2003. Army Colonel Peter R. Mansoor, the on-the-ground commander of the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division - the "Ready First Combat Team"--Describes his brigade's first year in Iraq, from the sweltering, chaotic summer after the Ba'athists' defeat to the transfer of sovereignty to an interim Iraqi government a year later. Uniquely positioned to observe, record, and assess the events of that fateful year, Mansoor now explains what went right and wrong as the U.S. military confronted an insurgency of unexpected strength and tenacity. Drawing not only on his own daily combat journal but also on observations by embedded reporters, news reports, combat logs, archived e-mails, and many other sources, Mansoor offers a contemporary record of the valor, motivations, and resolve of the 1st Brigade and its attachments during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Yet this is more than a personal memoir or unit history. Baghdad at Sunrise provides a detailed, nuanced analysis of U.S. counterinsurgency operations in Iraq, and along with it critically important lessons for America's military and political leaders of the twenty-first century
The development of combat effective divisions in the United States Army during World War II by Peter R Mansoor( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

USAREUR 2010 : harnessing the potential of NATO enlargement by Peter R Mansoor( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

NATO's enlargement in the post-Cold War era has fundamentally altered the political and military realities of the security structure that kept peace in Europe for over half a century. The inclusion of Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic in 1999 and the upcoming inclusion of seven new members in 2004, have created both new challenges and increased opportunities for U.S. policy in the region. More nebulous objectives including protection of human rights, combating terrorism, ensuring peace and stability, and preparing expeditionary forces for use outside of NATO territory have replaced the raison d'etre of the alliance before 1989, to deter the expansion of the Soviet Union. Furthermore, NATO consensus in any given crisis is problematical, as has been demonstrated in recent alliance disunity over policy towards Iraq. In response, the United States has had to adapt its strategy to take into account the shifting political realities engendered by the collapse of the Soviet Union, NATO's expansion, and the ongoing war against terrorism. The stationing of the bulk of U.S. ground forces in Germany, once mandated by the Soviet threat, is no longer a military necessity. Indeed, there are compelling reasons to move U.S. ground forces into Eastern Europe: to help local militaries reach NATO interoperability standards, to stabilize new democracies, to gain better access to potential areas of instability, and to acquire improved training areas, among others. Spreading American units among several European states is also an important hedge against risk should a host nation deny the use of its infrastructure to prevent U.S. forces stationed on its territory from deploying out-of-area
The brains of the air force : Laurence Kuter and the making of the United States air force by Joel Higley( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examines the establishment of the United States Air Force as an independent service, through the lens of General Laurence Kuter. Covering from his birth through the end of the Second World War, it yields five observations. First, Laurence "Larry" Kuter played an unappreciated role in shaping the United States Air Force and its antecedents. Second, the Air Corps Tactical School's impact on its students was likely minimal, but the school's impact on its faculty--particularly its most junior members--was almost inestimable. Third, fighter pilots dominated the senior ranks of the Air Force and its antecedents from the Interwar Period through well into the 1950s. Fourth, the Army's interwar personnel policies had disproportionately negative impacts on Air Corps development, but very positive impacts on Kuter's career. The effects of those policies, combined with the massive army air corps/army air forces expansion from 1939 through 1944, provided a greater justification for service independence than strategic bombing did. Finally, the first major war that the Air Force fought, wherein it had reasonably full control over the selection and professional development of its people, all the way up to its senior leaders, was the First Gulf War in 1991
Linking Doctrine to Action: A New Coin Center-of-Gravity Analysis( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Just as there is no one weapon that guarantees superiority in conventional warfare, there is no silver bullet when it comes to counterinsurgency (COIN) operations. Field Manual 3-24, "Counterinsurgency," provides a firm doctrinal foundation, as corroborated in Battle Command Knowledge System chat rooms, training at the U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Center and the Taji Counterinsurgency Center for Excellence, and field experience in Iraq and Afghanistan. Even so, there is still a gap between doctrine and tactical results in COIN warfare. This article seeks to fill that gap by introducing what the authors believe is a useful planning tool: the COIN center of gravity (COG) analysis, integrated as the culminating step of COIN intelligence preparation of the battlefield (IPB). COIN COG analysis translates theory into practice from the bottom up, exposing insurgent lines of operation (LOOs) and suggesting possible counters to them. Rather than thrusting objectives from the top down that may or may not apply to a given situation, it balances counterinsurgent efforts and provides metrics. Links between COIN IPB and the root causes of a conflict, and between COIN COG analysis and tactical actions, are analyzed to figure out how to preempt insurgent activity instead of merely reacting to it. The process approaches COIN from the dual perspective of the nature of the population and the nature of the insurgent, not from the perspective of the counterinsurgent. The authors' aim is to understand the enemy's specific strategy, get inside his decision cycle, and predict his likely actions. To accomplish this, they use the four steps of COIN IPB: (1) Understand the environment, (2) Determine how the enemy is using the root causes of conflict to generate or heighten popular discontent and thereby manipulate the population, (3) Discern the insurgent's strategy and his likely actions, and (4) Culminate steps 1-3 with an analysis of the COIN COG
Sequestration ramifications : community effects on social services and military spending( Visual )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human service and military leaders share information about the sequestration with affect social programs and military spending
U.S. strategic considerations in the post 9/11 world by Daniel P Bolger( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Two-part video from the United States Army War College's Landpower Conference, held 2-4 December, 2015. The first video features the keynote address by Daniel P. Bolger, discussing the reasons why the United States has lost the War on Terrorism, the Iraq War, and the Afghan War, followed by a question and answer session. The second video features three speeches: "Strategic land power / lopsided wars of peace", by Brian M. Michelson, a discussion on U.S. strategy and approaches to dealing with conflict in the Islamic world, by Michael Duggan, and "Maritime power and the case for a continental commitment", by Williamson Murray, followed by a question and answer session moderated by Peter Mansoor
Economics of emergencies : North Carolina, civil defense, and the Cold War, 1940-1963 by Frank A Blazich( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Civil defense in the early Cold War years resulted from a perceived security threat to the American homeland. But whereas Americans remained skeptical of the ability to defend against nuclear attack, the assignment of disaster relief responsibility to civil defense provided a new avenue along which federal "defense" funds would flow. North Carolina's civil defense history broadly mirrors the changes and evolution in the federal program but differs noticeably in how civil defense was implemented in communities more concerned with natural disasters than nuclear attack. State civil defense efforts served not just as a tool to secure federal money for infrastructure improvement, but also as a way to make North Carolina a safer place for business investment. By orienting the state's civil defense program and policies toward planning for and responding to natural disasters, state leaders sought to minimize the damage such disasters could have on efforts to promote economic development. Federal civil defense funds essentially helped North Carolina develop an emergency management and response apparatus that reassured businessmen wanting to invest in new ventures that the state could effectively protect such investments
 
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Baghdad at sunrise : a Brigade Commander's war in Iraq
Covers
The GI offensive in Europe : the triumph of American infantry divisions, 1941-1945
Languages
English (78)