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Fri Mar 21 17:14:18 2014 UTClccn-n990133770.00Improving National Capacities for Response to Complex Emergencies0.710.73Improving national capacity to respond to complex emergencies : the U.S. experience /60871634Douglas_Luten 990133774923430lccn-no96025147Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflictlccn-n80044775Carnegie Corporation of New Yorklccn-n80013253Atlantic Council of the United Stateslccn-n79122811Army War College (U.S.)lccn-no2011068673World Affairs Council of Jacksonvillenc-army war coll carlisle barracks paARMY WAR COLL CARLISLE BARRACKS PAviaf-244275408CARNEGIE COMMISSION ON PREVENTING DEADLY CONFLICT WASHINGTON DClccn-n84081787University of North Floridanp-joulwan, georgeJoulwan, GeorgeauiLute, Douglas E.Case studiesHistoryUnited StatesPeacekeeping forces, AmericanInternational relations administrationHumanitarian assistance, AmericanArmed Forces--Civic actionDisaster reliefCrisis management in governmentEmergency managementMilitary planningIntervention (International law)Military assistance, AmericanYugoslav War (1991-1995)Political scienceAfghan War (2001-)AfghanistanIraq War (2003-2011)PakistanAmerican Intervention in Haiti (1994-1995)IraqHaitiMilitary campaignsBosnia and HercegovinaOperation Restore Hope (1992-1993)195219971998200995513355.357JZ1480888ocn039198953book19980.73Lute, Douglas EImproving national capacity to respond to complex emergencies : the U.S. experience42ocn037882522book19970.47Lute, Douglas EImproving national capacities for response to complex emergenciesHistoryCase studiesThis paper evaluates how the U.S. government coordinates its responses to post- Cold War complex emergencies. Given that the U.S. may choose to be involved in future responses, it argues that the U.S. must adapt its bureaucratic procedures to take account of the new reality of internal conflicts. This adaptation will entail changing the policy-making process to permit timely anticipation of and effective response to humanitarian crises. The aim is to improve policy planning and implementation, increasing US policy coherence and effectiveness white avoiding the pitfalls that have come to typify these operations in practice. The paper begins at the root of the coordination problem: the tasks required on the ground and the actors who can perform these tasks. This assessment highlights the complexity of these emergencies and points out the formidable challenges of coordination at the national policy level. This analysis illuminates four requirements for improved policy coordination. The paper next considers three cases -- Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia -- to compare how the U.S. government coped with unfolding events. The paper concludes with specific recommendations for improving coordination within the U.S. government11ocn222593925book19970.47Lute, Douglas EImproving national capacities to respond to complex emergenciesCase studies11ocn319246877visu20090.47Lute, Douglas EThe outlook for success in Iraq and AfghanistanGeneral Lute describes conditions in Iraq as the U.S. begins to wind down combat operations. He discusses the change of mission and what he sees as the challenges ahead for the Iraqis as their government moves forward to provide security and stability for its citizens. Lute considers Afghanistan to be a much tougher problem. He believes it will take many years to transition to a stable nation. The Afghan government is currently very weak. The Taliban see this as an opportunity to challenge the government and regain control of the country. The border regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan are increasingly used as safe havens by major insurgency groups in the region. Lute predicts that it will be Pakistan that will prove the biggest foreign policy challenge for the Obama administration as Pakistan struggles to transition to a fully democratic nation and defeat extremist elements. Lute believes that the situation in Afghanistan and Pakistan may well get worse before it gets better. Durable, long term solutions will only come from the citizens of the countries. Solutions cannot be imposed. The United States can only assist and support11ocn227852844file1997Improving National Capacities for Response to Complex EmergenciesThis paper evaluates how the U.S. government coordinates its responses to post- Cold War complex emergencies. Given that the U.S. may choose to be involved in future responses, it argues that the U.S. must adapt its bureaucratic procedures to take account of the new reality of internal conflicts. This adaptation will entail changing the policy-making process to permit timely anticipation of and effective response to humanitarian crises. The aim is to improve policy planning and implementation, increasing US policy coherence and effectiveness white avoiding the pitfalls that have come to typify these operations in practice. The paper begins at the root of the coordination problem: the tasks required on the ground and the actors who can perform these tasks. This assessment highlights the complexity of these emergencies and points out the formidable challenges of coordination at the national policy level. This analysis illuminates four requirements for improved policy coordination. The paper next considers three cases -- Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia -- to compare how the U.S. government coped with unfolding events. The paper concludes with specific recommendations for improving coordination within the U.S. governmentFri Mar 21 16:01:07 EDT 2014batch7839