WorldCat Identities

Open Society Foundation

Overview
Works: 337 works in 393 publications in 9 languages and 2,274 library holdings
Genres: Rules  Case studies  Trials, litigation, etc  History  Periodicals 
Roles: Other, isb
Classifications: KF9635, 345.73052
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Open Society Foundation
Citizenship law in Africa : a comparative study by Bronwen Manby( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1,524 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Few African countries provide for an explicit right to a nationality. Laws and practices governing citizenship effectively leave hundreds of thousands of people in Africa without a country. These stateless Africans can neither vote nor stand for office; they cannot enrol their children in school, travel freely, or own property; they cannot work for the government; they are exposed to human rights abuses. Statelessness exacerbates and underlies tensions in many regions of the continent. Citizenship Law in Africa, a comparative study by two programs of the Open Society Foundations, describes the often arbitrary, discriminatory, and contradictory citizenship laws that exist from state to state and recommends ways that African countries can bring their citizenship laws in line with international rights norms. The report covers topics such as citizenship by descent, citizenship by naturalisation, gender discrimination in citizenship law, dual citizenship, and the right to identity documents and passports. It is essential reading for policymakers, attorneys, and activists. This third edition is a comprehensive revision of the original text, which is also updated to reflect developments at national and continental levels. The original tables presenting comparative analysis of all the continent's nationality laws have been improved, and new tables added on additional aspects of the law. Since the second edition was published in 2010, South Sudan has become independent and adopted its own nationality law, while there have been revisions to the laws in Côte d'Ivoire, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Namibia, Niger, Senegal, Seychelles, South Africa, Sudan, Tunisia and Zimbabwe. The African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights and the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child have developed important new normative guidance
Addressing ethnic profiling by police : a report on the Strategies for Effective Police Stop and Search Project : Improving relations between police and minority communities by increasing the fairness, effectiveness, and accountability of police stops in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Spain( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Published by the Open Society Justice Initiative, Addressing Ethnic Profiling by Police reports on efforts to reform police practices in three countries and provides a roadmap toward greater fairness, improved efficiency, and better police-community relations. The book describes how selected police forces in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Spain worked with the Justice Initiative to monitor police use of stops and searches, determine if they disproportionately affected minority groups, and assess their efficacy in detecting and solving crime. Addressing Ethnic Profiling by Police details the successes and shortcomings of the reform project. It tracks the changes undertaken by participating police forces, including a municipal police force in Spain that increased the effectiveness of stops while reducing their number and disproportionate impact on minority communities. The book includes chapters on the nature and legality of ethnic profiling and the process of evaluating and changing police practices. It also includes a guide to resources for police forces wishing to undertake reforms.--Publisher description
Treatment or torture? : Applying international human rights standards to drug retention centers( )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: People identified as drug users in many countries are confined to abusive locked detention centers for months or even years. Such detention centers are supposedly mandated to treat and "rehabilitate" drug users, but the "treatment" they receive in some cases amounts to torture or other cruel, inhuman, and degrading punishment. In Treatment or Torture? Applying International Human Rights Standards to Drug Detention Centers, legal experts review common forms of abuse in drug detention centers and show how these practices in many cases are in violation of basic human rights treaties widely ratified by most nations worldwide. International health and drug-control agencies--including the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, UNAIDS, and the World Health Organization--all endorse comprehensive, evidence-based drug dependence treatment services. Yet drug detention centers rarely provide treatment that meets these standards. Depending on the country, so-called rehabilitation consists of a regime of military drills, forced labor, psychological and moral re-education, and shackling, caning, and beating. Treatment or Torture? comes in advance of the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking and the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture--both on June 26, 2011. The report was published by the Campaign to Stop Torture in Health Care, a coalition led by the Open Society Foundations, and featured legal analysis by Human Rights Watch, Harm Reduction International, and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network
Human rights and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria by Joanne Csete( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a crucial actor in the worldwide response to HIV. In less than ten years, it not only has provided billions of dollars for AIDS programs, but it has also created processes and collaborations that have opened doors to meaningful participation in public health programs for people living with and vulnerable to HIV. The Global Fund explicitly espouses human rights-centered approaches to HIV. Yet a truly rights-based HIV response is a challenge to any person or organization because it entails courageous confrontation of sexism, homophobia, moral judgmentalism, unjust criminalization, and cultural norms. This can pose an inherent dilemma for the Global Fund, which claims as a central principle of its work that the programs it funds should result from "country-driven" processes. The objective of this paper is to examine the human rights content and impact of the Global Fund's work in three areas--grantmaking processes, grants, and advocacy. The paper examines some ways in which marginalized persons living with and vulnerable to HIV have become empowered through Global Fund processes, including changes in national policies and practices. The paper also addresses ways in which the Global Fund may have inadvertently reinforced activities or institutions that undermine human rights.--Publisher description
Globalizing torture : CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition by Amrit Singh( )

6 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ifølge rapporten har 54 lande verden over samarbejdet med USA om kidnapninger, forsvindinger, hemmelige fængsler og tortur
Mapping digital media : Thailand : a report by the Open Society Foundations by Open Society Foundations( Book )

11 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in 3 languages and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Moldova, the combination of digitization and political change has increased the diversity of media outlets and their news, the plurality of opinions, and the transparency of public institutions, while it has diminished political interference in the media. Yet the lack of independence of regulatory institutions, the nontransparent media ownership structure, and the slow pace of digital switch-over continue to undermine these achievements. In order to reinforce positive change, this report proposes four kinds of reform. Firstly, the legal framework for digital switch-over must be completed in the near future if the country is to be ready for the transition before the switch-off date. The provisions for public interest, access, and affordability should be given priority and, for this purpose, participation of civil society groups in the drafting process is vital. This framework will also speed up the adoption of the new Broadcasting Code, a historic document that will end the era of non-transparent media ownership, the second area that needs urgent reform. Thirdly, with public awareness of the purpose and implications of switch-over virtually nonexistent, an information campaign and public debate on the issue need to start without delay. Finally, the independence of two key institutions, the Broadcasting Coordinating Council and the PSB, needs to be strengthened. In both cases, this can be done by changing funding models and adopting clearer regulatory safeguards against government interference. El proyecto Mapping Digital Media analiza las oportunidades y los riesgos creados por la transición de lo tradicional a los medios digitales. Estudia 60 países, el proyecto examina cómo estos cambios afectan el servicio básico de cualquier sistema democrático que debe proporcionar los medios de comunicación: noticias sobre asuntos políticos, económicos y sociales
Uganda : a survey by George W Lugalambi( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uganda's broadcast media landscape has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years. While the public broadcaster remains the dominant national player--in terms of reach--in both radio and television, commercial broadcasters have introduced a substantial level of diversity in the industry. Public broadcasting faces serious competition from the numerous private and independent broadcasters, especially in and around the capital Kampala and major urban centres. In fact, the private/commercial sector clearly dominates the industry in most respects, notably productivity and profitability. The public broadcaster, which enjoys wider geographical coverage, faces the challenge of trying to fulfill a broad mandate with little funding. This makes it difficult for UBC to compete with the more nimble operators in the commercial/private sector. Overall, there appears to be a healthy degree of pluralism and diversity in terms of ownership
Recent Developments at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia : December 2007 Update by Open Society Justice Initiative( )

7 editions published between 2007 and 2013 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The death of Ieng Sary one of the three accused in Case 002 at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia casts into sharp relief the many delays and difficulties that threaten to deny justice to the victims of the Khmer Rouge. The court continues to struggle with Case 002 while the specter of political interference haunts Cases 003 and 004 and a funding crisis hangs over the entire institution. This report examines recent events at the court and offers recommendations for action by the UN, the Royal Government of Cambodia, and the donors to the court. This is the latest in a series of reports on the ECCC by the Open Society Justice Initiative which has monitored proceedings at the tribunal since before the tribunal was launched
Art in Yugoslavia, 1992-1995( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in Serbian and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strangers at the door : night raids by international forces lose hearts and minds of Afghans : a case study by E. L Gaston( )

4 editions published in 2010 in 3 languages and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This briefing paper, issued by the Open Society Institute and Afghan nongovernmental organization The Liaison Office, reports that night raids by international forces in Afghanistan are widely associated with abuse and impunity. These raids, which are often based on misinformation or bad tips, also lead to the detention of innocent people. This discredits the justice system, alienates the population, and undermines efforts to strengthen the rule of law. The paper concludes that Afghans' negative perceptions of international military actors will not change as long as abuses associated with night raids continue. The paper is based on research conducted between September and December 2009 to understand how Afghan communities viewed international forces and whether they considered new military policy reforms to be effective. Though the study focused on the two conflict-prone southeastern provinces of Paktia and Khost, similar responses have been documented in other regions of Afghanistan, suggesting a widespread, consistent problem.--Publisher Web site
Democracy to come( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Collection of essays by several authors
Equal access to quality education for Roma( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Roma, with an estimated population of between 8 and 12 million spread across the whole continent, are one of Europe's largest and most vulnerable minorities. Throughout Europe, Roma remain excluded from many aspects of society, denied their rights and entrenched in poverty. The particular problems faced by Roma in accessing quality educational opportunities have been widely recognised."--Preface
Putting complementarity into practice : Domestic justice for international crimes in DRC, Uganda, and Kenya by Eric A Witte( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wars and mass violence regularly leave thousands of people raped or killed in their wake. National justice systems are meant to take the lead in bringing perpetrators to justice. But legal systems are often unable to do so because of armed conflict, corruption, or inadequate investment. Moreover, the enthusiasm of political leaders to bring high-level suspects to justice is often lacking. At the same time, the International Criminal Court (ICC) cannot deal with all the international crimes that take place around the world. Indeed, the ICC was founded on the idea of "complementarity"--That the ICC can only step in when states are unwilling or unable to prosecute mass crimes. Increasingly, the global community is starting to realize that other actors--donor states, civil society, international organizations--must assume greater responsibility to make sure these crimes do not go unpunished. An Open Society Justice Initiative report, Putting Complementarity Into Practice: Domestic Justice for International Crimes in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, and Kenya, argues that rule of law donors and programmers--and their partners in government and civil society--can make a substantial contribution to ending the impunity gap for serious crimes. By strategically building on justice efforts already underway by rule of law donors, states around the world that have suffered from massive international crimes may have a better chance of providing accountability for these abuses. Examining three case studies--the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, and Kenya--the report assesses what has already been done by rule of law actors to promote national accountability for mass crimes, identifies existing gaps, offers lessons learned from past experience, and makes recommendations for going forward. The 118-page report, undertaken and published by the Open Society Justice Initiative, in conjunction with the Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa and the Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa, seeks to determine: How the international community has supported these post-conflict states in developing the capacity to carry out fair trials through genuine investigations and prosecutions; The extent to which these efforts have been integrated into more general rule-of-law programming, and The level of coordination among donors, and between donors and governments, on complementarity-related activities. This report should provide essential reading for rule of law donors, government officials, legal practitioners, and members of civil society.--Publisher description
Human rights and HIV/AIDS : now more than ever 10 reasons why human rights should occupy the center of the global AIDS struggle by Ralf Erich Jürgens( )

5 editions published in 2009 in 5 languages and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the 2006 United Nations High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS, world leaders reaffirmed that "the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all is an essential element in the global response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic." Yet, 25 years into the AIDS epidemic, this "essential element" remains the missing piece in the fight against AIDS. Now more than ever, law and human rights should occupy the center of the global HIV/AIDS struggle. This booklet, published by the Open Society Law and Health Initiative, presents 10 reasons why. Originally released in 2006, this revised edition contains the endorsements of 24 leading HIV/AIDS organizations and networks throughout the world
Equal access to quality education for Roma( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Entrenching impunity : Moldova's Response to Police Violence During the April 2009 Post-Election Demonstrations = Sub acoperirea impunitășii raport despre reacția autorităților moldovenești la violența poliției în timpul protestelor post-electorale din aprilir 2009 by Clarisa Bencomo( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Moldovan police beat and otherwise ill-treated at least 300 peaceful protesters of the nearly 700 they detained following the parliamentary elections in April, according to this report released by the Soros Foundation--Moldova. In at least 100 cases, the ill treatment took place inside police commissariats. Entrenching Impunity: Moldova's Response to Police Violence During the April 2009 Post-Election Demonstrations documents personal accounts of people who suffered beatings, sleep deprivation and verbal abuse at the hands of police after the April demonstrations. This report is the most extensive collection of information available to date on the number of individuals police apprehended during the April events. Peaceful demonstrations to protest the outcomes of the parliamentary elections in April turned violent when a small number of demonstrators began throwing stones at police. Authorities made little effort to control rogue elements in the crowd; by the evening of April 7 they started a horrible campaign of mass arrests, which lasted a few days. The report also offers recommendations for the new government to end impunity and restore confidence in the justice system. They include creating a truly independent public commission to continue investigations into the events in April, make public recommendations for reforms, and promote accountability.--Publisher description
Tyrants on trial : keeping order in the courtroom by Patricia M Wald( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trials involving heads of state and other leaders accountable for gross abuses of human rights pose particular challenges for judges and prosecutors, according to this report released by the Open Society Justice Initiative. Tyrants on Trial: Keeping Order in the Courtroom examines the difficulties of ensuring a fair trial when former leaders defend themselves, often by attacking the court while simultaneously treating it as a platform for lengthy espousals of their broad political and ideological views. The author, Patricia M. Wald, was chief judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and also served as a judge for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. These trials often revolve around bigger-than-life personalities who see themselves as historic figures defending nationalistic causes and who are determined to make their case to a worldwide audience. The report notes that such trials are inevitably difficult to control. Drawing on Wald's experiences, and the experiences of judges and participants in other celebrated proceedings, the report provides insightful lessons learned and practical recommendations on the scope of the charges, judicial control of proceedings, self-representation, and media relations.--Publisher description
Right to information in minority languages in Serbia( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Policy, prekogranična saradnja instrument razvoja Srbije( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in Serbian and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"I can stop and search whoever I want" : police stops of ethnic minorities in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Spain by Joel Miller( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Addressing ethnic profiling by police : a report on the Strategies for Effective Police Stop and Search Project : Improving relations between police and minority communities by increasing the fairness, effectiveness, and accountability of police stops in Bulgaria, Hungary, and Spain
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Alternative Names
Fond za otvoreno društvo

Fond za otvoreno društvo Beograd

Fund for an Open Society (Bělehrad, Srbsko)

Fund for an Open Society (Belgrade, Serbia)

OSF

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