WorldCat Identities

Haggar, Salah el-

Overview
Works: 27 works in 77 publications in 3 languages and 3,372 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, htt
Classifications: TD188.5.E33, 363.700962
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Salah el- Haggar
Sustainable industrial design and waste management : cradle-to-cradle for sustainable development by Salah el- Haggar( )

29 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and Polish and held by 1,838 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Sustainable Industrial Design and Waste Management was inspired by the need to have a text that enveloped awareness and solutions to the ongoing issues and concerns of waste generated from industry. The development of science and technology has increased human capacity to extract resources from nature and it is only recently that industries are being held accountable for the detrimental effects the waste they produce has on the environment. Increased governmental research, regulation and corporate accountability are digging up issues pertaining to pollution control and waste treatment and environmental protection."--Jacket
People and pollution : cultural constructions and social action in Egypt by Nicholas S Hopkins( )

8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,247 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study looks at how Egyptians in particular understand environmental problems and what their roles are in the solutions. The focus of Egyptian concerns lies not in the Western global perpective. but immediate environmetal degradation, including sewage, garbage, and noise pollution
Sustainability and innovation : the next global industrial revolution by Salah el- Haggar( Book )

9 editions published between 2014 and 2017 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sustainable development; environmental policy; economic aspects
ROADMAP FOR GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY - RISE OF THEGREEN COMMUNITIES by Salah el- Haggar( )

6 editions published in 2019 in English and Undetermined and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Progressive increases in consumer demands along with aggressive industrial consumption led the world to proximate resource depletion, weather changes, soil and air degradation and water quality deterioration. We now know that the paradigm of production at the expense of human condition is not sustainable. This book briefly explains how we reached this situation and offers suggestions as to what can be done to overcome it. It invites the best entrepreneurial talent and scientific and technological know-how to develop a sustainable economy around sustainable communities, services, and sectors. A major obstacle previously identified by involved parties was the ability of accommodating for the emerging economic growth without causing harm to the environment, especially with resource depletion. This book provides the solution by creating a need to bring on a new revolution that preserves the rights of next generations to live in a healthy environment This Sustainability Revolution requires the integration of economic, environmental, and social factor as well as the practical aspects of implementing sustainability through green activities, which are discussed throughout the book. In this book, a globalization is proposed that encourages creativity and innovation towards sustainability. With this global sustainability approach (real globalization) both rich and poor will benefit from the global sustainability approach. This will close the gap between rich and poor. Developing countries could reap the benefit of current technology without undergoing many of the growing pains associated with development of these technologies. Governments are able to better work together towards common goals now that there is an advantage in cooperation, an improved ability to interact and coordinate, and a global awareness of issues. The book presents a sustainability roadmap to bring together various concepts, that have been dealt with independently by previous authors, and link them to est ablish the fundamental practical steps. The flow path and the direction for successful implementation of a sustainability roadmap are also discussed in detail in the book. For the first time, the authors use sustainable communities to create a better quality of life for residents while minimizing the use of the resources to meet current needs and ensure adequate resources for future generations. These green communities create new industries for the local economy and improve public health, which offers more hope for their citizens. Sustainable transportation, renewable energy, recycling, clean water, and urban forests help to make a more livable community and help to control the global climate change. They involve all citizens and incorporate local values into decision-making
Annular-dispersed air/water flows in venturimeters by Salah el- Haggar( Book )

3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ke chi xu gong ye she ji yu fei wu guan li : "cong yao lan dao yao lan" de ke chi xu fa zhan by Salah el- Haggar( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in Chinese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Investigation of reinforced polystyrene foam waste with natural fibers or synthetic fibers by Riham Abdel Aziz Abdel Mohsen( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The production of plastics has reached about 300 million tons globally each year. The use of energy resources, the health problem and the impacts on the environment from its disposal phase trigger overriding concerns on plastic recycling which can both save energy consumption in production phase and achieve green end-of-life approach for plastics. Polystyrene is hardly biodegradable. It takes at least 500 years to decompose. It is estimated that by volume, it takes as much as thirty percent of landfills worldwide. It is also flammable subject to risk of accidental ignition and cause of huge fires. Polystyrene is not recycled because it is usually not cost effective. The problems with recycling polystyrene are economical and technical. The start-up costs for a polystyrene recycling plant are enormous and the pay-off, as of now, is not cost effective. The main objective of the thesis is to develop a new recycling technology in order to produce a cost effective product entirely out of waste. Polystyrene waste is reinforced with fibers whether natural or synthetic to improve its mechanical properties and hence could be used for different useful applications. The new products will reduce the detrimental problem of solid waste to the environment as well as save energy, natural resources and cost. Finally, an innovative, environment friendly, cheap and effective yet simple technology is developed to determine the suitability of polystyrene foam waste fiber reinforced composites techniques Mechanical properties of plastic composites using polystyrene foam waste reinforced with synthetic fibers such as fiber glass waste, or natural fibers such as rice straw have been investigated in this study. The fiber waste (synthetic, or natural) was mixed with the polystyrene waste at four weight ratios of 20,30,40, and 50% for the experiments. Samples were prepared using indirect heating and hydraulic press then mechanical properties were evaluated including tensile, flexural, compression and abrasion. The obtained results indicated that the mechanical properties of the synthetic fiber composites were higher than the natural fiber reinforced composites. The best synthetic fiber content was 30 wt.%. The tensile strength was increased by 102 %, the flexural by 54 %, the compression strength by 19 % and abrasion wear better than the properties of the polystyrene waste without reinforcement
Solar technologies deployment in urban Egyptian communities by Ghada Abdel Azim( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Achieving environmental sustainability of sugarcane industry in Egypt : an application of life cycle assessment by Dalia Adel Habib Nakhla( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Sugarcane industry in Egypt goes back to the year 710 AD. Cane plantations are concentrated in the area of Upper Egypt. The total amount of cane cultivated in Upper Egypt is about 16 million tons per year. There are eight sugarcane producing factories in Egypt, most of them located close to the cultivations. The sugarcane industry in Egypt can be currently defined as an open industrial system that consumes material and energy and creates products and wastes. The two main stages of sugarcane production are the agricultural stage and the industrial stage. The agricultural stage involves cane cultivation which involves the use of fertilizers, water and fuel for irrigation, and cane harvesting which results in the production of two main residues which are cane tops and dry leaves. The cane tops are collected and used by the farmers to feed their livestock. The dry leaves, on the other hand, are openly burnt resulting in pollution of the ambient air. The cane is transported from the fields to the mills mainly by the sugarcane train. In the mill, the production process involves the consumption of chemicals, water and fuel to produce a number of by-products in addition to the main two products: raw sugar and molasses. The main residues or by-products are filter mud residing from the juice clarification process, bagasse from the cane squeezing and furnace ash in case the bagasse is burnt in the power house to provide steam and electricity for the mill. The filter mud and furnace ash are used in their raw form as soil additive due to their nutritional value. The bagasse, on the other hand, is either burnt in the mill power house to provide steam and electricity to the mill, or is directed to auxiliary factories to produce paper or fiberboard. The main aspects that have contributed to the research motivation: (1) mismanagement of the considerable amounts of residues generated during sugarcane harvest and its associated negative environmental impacts, (2) lack of tools and data for assessment of waste management alternatives based on environmental criteria rather than economic ones, (3) lack of low cost sustainable waste management options for sugar cane industry to achieve environmental balance. This research aims at assessing the environmental sustainability of the sugar industry in Egypt to achieve an environmentally balanced industry approaching zero waste. This is done by analyzing the current practices of reuse/recycling of by-products/residues generated from the sugarcane industry from its agricultural and industrial stages, as well as propose alternative environmental friendly practices for reuse of residues, such as composting and silage production. To achieve this, the research is divided into stages; identification of main current and potential uses of residues in Egypt, data collection, and data analysis using Life Cycle Analysis approach. Primary data and information was collected through field visits, interviews and questionnaires. The data collected from secondary sources included books, journals, conference papers, governmental reports, international organizations' statistics and websites. Pilot scale experimental composting and silage making was performed on a combination of agricultural and industrial residues of the sugarcane industry including green tops, dry leaves, filter mud, bagasse and furnace ash. Results of the different treatments were analyzed and recommendations on the best combinations were given in terms of the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the produced compost or organic fertilizer. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the environmental performance of the sugarcane industry in Egypt including its agricultural and industrial stages. It is also used to identify the most environmental friendly options for the reuse of the residues generated from the sugarcane industry. Alternatives uses of bagasse, a cane milling residue, in the generation of steam and electricity, or production of paper, fiberboard or compost is investigated. It is also compared to processes that produce the same product but through other raw material. Recommendations and limitations of each option are presented and discussed
The three-stage entrepreneurial model to empower recycling product designers by Ismail Tammam( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Two of every five Egyptian youth aged 20-24 suffer unemployment and abject poverty. And while 40% of Egyptians have entrepreneurial intentions only 2.9% manage to establish their businesses past the 3.5-year mark of regulated operation. The main reasons for this failure have been defined to be: the poor entrepreneurial education at all stages, the poor legal & commercial infrastructure, as well as lack of supportive government programmes. The proposed solution is a three-stage process; it begins with formulating a 'matrix model', which is a detailed workplan for the transfer of an entrepreneurial idea from concept to a sustainable business, then developing a successful alpha product line that would allow business operation & sustenance, and then giving room for research and development of new similar products by incubating entrepreneurial ideas that can be turned into profitable product lines later on. The matrix model is the product-customised version of "Egyptian Ecosystem Theory of Change" by Saeed et al, 2015. The alpha product proposed is a flooring tile created from cleaned and shredded trash at the AUC Sustainable Development labs by heat-pressing plastics as a binder and redbrick as a filler, to create an environmentally friendly product line, then the tile is set to be tested against relevant ASTM standards for flooring tiles. Then, the proposed business model is to use part of the revenue to sponsor research and development, provided it is based on the 'private incubator' model. The idea is seen to positively impact the society by providing employment for the young entrepreneurs, the economy by boosting production and investment opportunities, as well as the environment by encouraging a recycling economy. This conforms with sustainable development goal number 8.6 which promotes substantially reducing the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training
Sustainable industrial design and waste management cradle-to-cradle for sustainable development by Salah el- Haggar( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sustainable design guidelines for new and existing schools in Egypt by Sara Harb( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: As a global society, we are faced with an ever-growing number of sustainability challenges in the social, environmental and economic sectors. Visions for addressing such challenges have been put forward in international blueprints and policy agreements on advancing sustainable development. In these documents and agreements, education has been identified as a crucial avenue for pushing forward sustainable behaviors. Education is the fundamental element for the development of any nation, and its shortage has a direct effect on the social, environmental and economic development of the country (El Baradei & Baradei, 2004). Turning schools into sustainable schools has been a research and policy focus for years, especially throughout the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. Building codes and practices play an important role in turning schools into places of sustainable learning and behavior. Previous research has addressed the concept of sustainable schools extensively, in the lights of the sustainable school design criteria and the positive impacts of having sustainable physical spaces for education. However, none cater for the Egyptian context, and are simultaneously based on building assessment standards, as well as the integration of appropriate social, environmental, and economic sustainability themes. The research project explores the requirements of Egyptian schools in the implementation of sustainable school designs and architectural changes. The thesis takes a qualitative research method with an inductive approach, in which theory development is based on and evolves with the study's findings. The thesis will make suggestions for the content of a new guideline, based on the available literature as well as on the analysis of detailed data collected based on the observation of school grounds and daily school routines and procedures during a series of school visits. The directing parameters of the guideline are based on sustainable building assessment guidelines, Egypt's pressing social, economic and environmental concerns, pedagogy of educational environments, students' social, psychological, and developmental needs, in order to develop a holistic framework. The guideline is divided into two main sections; new and existing schools. The guideline is further divided into three main sustainability categories: energy, water, and habitat; which is following the same category division adopted by EGGBC in the Tarsheed guidelines. The procedures of the research use a case study approach that focuses on one public school in Cairo, Gamal Abd El-Nasser which is located in Boulaq El Dakrour (BD), one of the poorest informal areas located in the western urban area of Greater Cairo within the boundaries of Giza Governorate. Criteria for selecting the school as a case study included choosing a preparatory school where the overall school infrastructure and conditions were of medium quality standards, making the school a potential candidate for upgrading its school infrastructure and processes to become a sustainable school in the future. The developed guideline is implemented in the case study school to demonstrate the flexibility, affordability and simplicity of attaining the required credits within the guidelines. The school scores a total of 9 out of 26 points in the Energy category, 7 out of 18 points in the Water category, 3 out of 12 points in the Indoor Environmental Quality sub-category, 6 out of 6 points in the Materials sub-category, and 36 out of 41 points in Sustainable Sites sub-category. This provides a sum of 56 out of 100 points, which awards the school a silver rating
Arab-African Conference for Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, 29th April - 1st May, 2001, Cairo, Egypt : conference proceedings by Arab-African Conference for Refrigeration and Air Conditioning( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A Techno-economic study for heating poultry houses using renewable energy by Heidi El Zanaty( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: In any broilers poultry house, fuel-based heating systems are commonly used to maintain the targeted temperatures for successful breeding of chicken. A considerable amount of fuel is consumed for this application, which leads to high running cost and contributes to the increase of air pollutant emissions. Given the current energy crisis and the urge to use renewable energy, this research studies the application of a solar heating system (SHS) for a poultry house. It includes the technical and economic study for the SHS and the integration of biogas produced from chicken manure as an auxiliary source of heat. The heating demand of a broilers poultry house of capacity 24000 birds located in Al Menia governorate in Egypt is calculated hourly over a complete year using TRNSYS simulation tool. Accordingly, a SHS is designed to cover part of this demand besides a fuel based auxiliary source. The system consists of: evacuated tubes, water storage tanks and fan coil units. The two main design variables of the SHS are the area of the solar collector (ASC) and the volume of the storage tanks (Vtank). An economical study of the SHS is carried out, where the net present value (NPV) is calculated. A solution space consisting of 65 different designs is explored, where the NPV is calculated at each solution to select the best economical design within the solution space. The calculation is performed twice, once using the Egyptian local fuel price, where the SHS is found to be economically feasible using certain designs only. The other calculation is performed using the international minimum benchmark price of diesel fuel, where the NPV of all designs is found to be significantly higher and thus, the use of SHS is more appealing at this fuel price. Other parameters such as the infiltration rate of the building and the usage of latent heat storage technique are examined to explore their effect on the performance of the SHS. Finally, an all-green heating solution is introduced, where bio-digesters are used to produce biogas from the waste of the poultry house in order to complement the SHS by covering the auxiliary energy needed. The economics of the all-green solution is examined and found to be bettered
Developing industrial resource sustainability roadmap : Cement industry case study by Mary Mamdouh Moharib( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: For proper implementation of sustainability, two dimensions need to be taken into consideration, resource conservation and pollution prevention. Compromising on any of the two would mean that future generations are deprived of their ability to meet their needs. Since resources are the building blocks of all economies, and a clean pollution free environment benefits the general welfare of the society, the economy and social part are automatically taken care of. The goals of resource sustainability were realized in the following three stages: 1. A roadmap was developed to address the management and strategic requirement for successful implementation of resource and environmental sustainability. Its components comprise inputs of binding regulations, internal organizational limitations, external concerns and the needs and expectations of involved parties. Business owners receive all the stakeholders' inputs and incorporate them into a sustainability management system. The management system is then used to implement an appropriate action plan corresponding to the goals and objectives of the SMS. The last step of the roadmap is a performance analysis to measure alignment with the cradle to cradle/ Industrial ecology goals and objectives previously set. One of the following two statuses is assigned in the evaluation: 1. A compliance status indicates a basic level of cradle to cradle 2. A beyond compliance status indicates that the facility was able to achieve the goals of cradle to cradle, while creating profit out of it. 1. A sustainability management system (SMS) was developed as a major requirement for success of the roadmap. The first step towards a successful management system is a policy commitment to resource sustainability. In the mean time, baseline conditions are measured and used in the strategic resource sustainability planning phase to: a) Determine a resource sustainability strategy. b) Set SMART goals and strategic objectives. c) Design support tools and performance measures. d) Establish strategic initiatives and action plans. 2. A model developing technique is proposed using a life cycle approach to measure the extent to which resource and environmental sustainability can be attainable. To demonstrate the idea, an evaluation tool, The Cement Resource and Emissions Monitoring Application was developed as a support tool, performance Measure and performance analysis for the cement industry. The model allows for the application of three industrial ecology techniques requiring changes in conventional ways in order to reduce emissions and raw materials. A case study was applied on Lafarge to demonstrate possible reductions in emissions and raw materials. Results showed that substituting fuel oil, natural gas and coke for rice straw resulted in a 36.5%, 28.2%, and 47.1 % drop in the total CO2 emissions respectively. Another benefit of substitution included an avoided 6126 kg of NOx emissions resulting if rice straw met its conventional fate, i.e. burned in the fields. It was also found that fuel substitution resulted in an avoided 3,000,000-5,000,000 kg of Sox emissions that would have normally been emitted as a result of fossil fuel burning and another 143,627 kg that would have occurred while burning rice in the fields. About 28,198,824 kg of CO that would have occurred as a result of field burning of rice straw was also possibly avoided. The second industrial ecology principle applied, featured substituting clinker for other raw materials. A 50 % decrease in clinker, resulted in a 50 % decrease in the amount of required fuel and a 50% decrease in the amount of energy required for clinker production, assuming a linear relationship between energy requirement and amount of clinker. It also resulted in a consequent 31.7 % CO2 reduction and a 50 % decrease in other emissions
Modeling and optimization of remanufacturing operations of spent products for sustainability by Eman Alaa Heikal( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: In last century, the world has witnessed a great deal of technological and industrial progress. Branded products manufacturers have been competing in introducing new versions of their products frequently. Retailers and banks have been developing relaxed paying systems to fund the purchase of these new products. Exchanging strategies have been initiated by companies for customers to exchange their old version product for the latest versions. Such exchanging strategies are famous for vehicles, mobiles, and electrical appliances. Hence, a huge amount of unused or spent products are generated every day. Many researchers have been developing different models for dealing with the decisions related to remanufacturing operations. However, there is no decision making system the manufacturers could use for cost / benefit assessment of disassembling and recovering these products that considers the following points: (1) evaluating the value of recovering the whole product versus value associated with recovering its disassembled items, (2) using Multi-Objective Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) to assign spent products and their items to various recovery alternatives considering their received physical conditions, (3) selection of operations for items is not limited by a fixed regular production-hour capacity for each operation, (4) model assumptions, constraints, and formulation that satisfy the three aspects of sustainability, which are economic, social responsibility, and environmental aspects in one step model, (5) considering other vital dimensions which are the quality of recovered products and the minimum batch size for vending recycled materials, (6) utilizing the recycling operation in the optimum way that increases revenue from vending isolated materials. The thesis addresses these points using mathematical modeling and optimization for the remanufacturing operations of spent products. The aim of this study is achieved through modeling the problem using a multi-objective mixed integer linear programming technique with two objective functions considering net profit maximization and total disposal weight minimization. Maximizing the net profit over specified planning periods satisfies the economic aspect of sustainability. Minimizing the total weight at all items assigned to disposal over specified planning periods satisfies the environmental aspect of sustainability. Initiating fair refunding system for spent products satisfies social responsibility aspect of sustainability. The optimum solutions of the model provides: optimal disassembly sequence of items, number of each item assigned to various recovery operations of the remanufacturing unit, specification of the required total regular production hours, total needed number of workers, and specification of the number of workers hired and fired. For verifying the proposed model and its LINGO code, the data of a simplified version of the trailer case study was used to display the model and tracking the displayed model to assure that the generated code exactly matches the model formulation, and to discover and correct any logical error. Then, the model was run several times to assure the accuracy of the model and to test the functionality of all the model mathematical equations. Its target was to assure that the integration of the model constraints exactly matched the logic of solving the problem, and the mathematical equation succeeded in expressing the model goals. A case study that involves a numerical real- life critical problem in Egypt is solved considering only the first objective function, which is targeting feasible solutions for the collected trailers that are prohibited to move on the Egyptian roads. The results show that the remanufacturing of semi-trailers from the collected trailers is the most profitable solution for the good-condition trailers, while applying the cannibalization operation on the bad conditions trailers is the most profitable solution for the case. The remanufacture unit would make a net profit of L.E 8,878,800 for applying this solution at the end of the three planning periods. In case the remanufacture unit decided to restrict its recovery activities to the good condition trailers, the net profit of scenario 2 is L.E 20,499,100 at the end of the three planning periods, which is associated with an increase of L.E 11,620,300 in profit compared to recovering different conditions trailers. A professional sensitivity analysis is implemented using the factorial design to accurately decide the significant input parameters that impact the net profit and total disposal weight at the end of the three planning periods for the trailers numerical problem. This factorial sensitivity analysis is designed to test 3 factors for 5 levels. Therefore, 53=125 runs are conducted of all possible combination of these factors (input parameters), and the determination of output responses corresponding to each combination. Hence, the significant input parameters that impact the decisions were concluded. The input parameters that were selected are: selling prices, refund costs, and direct labor processing costs. The output responses that were selected are the net profit and the total disposal weight. It was discovered that changing the selling prices of the output products from the recovery operations which are refurbishing, repairing, remanufacturing, and cannibalization, and the selling prices of the recycled materials has the most influential impact on the net profit, and has the only significant impact on the total disposal weight at the end of the three planning periods. The refund costs paid to the end users for compensating them of getting their products is the second significant factor on the net profit at the end of the three planning periods. Hence, it is crucial to specify these selling prices and refund costs wisely. Two approaches are used to solve the multiple objectives of the modified trailer case study, and to create a set of non-dominating solutions for the referred case which are: Minimax weighting method and constrained method. The most profitable and worst environmental non-dominated solution happened when the referred case was solved using the constrained method at bounding the disposal to 14870.3 kg, where the net profit value reaches its maximum of L.E 8,183,012, when the total weight of the items assigned to disposal reaches its peak of 14835.3 kg. This first best environmental non-dominating solution happened when the case was solved using the constrained method at bounding the disposal to 0 kg, where the net profit value reaches its minimum of L.E 7, 425,400. Solving the referred case using Minimax weighting methods is resulted in balancing solution of two competing objectives. The generated set of non-dominated solutions demonstrated the multi-objective nature of the proposed model
Evaluation of green building rating systems for Egypt by HebaAlla Mostafa Karmany( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The average life of most structural types of buildings is fifty years. This projected lifespan will accordingly have an impact not only on the current inhabitants but also on the future generations. Therefore, nowadays, the subject of environmental conditions, and how our actions affect it, is of considerable consideration. The Egyptian economy was previously dependent on the agricultural, industrial, and transportation sector. Today, the construction industry plays an important role in the economic growth of the country, which is the key to developing our quality of life. Despite the difficult conditions and political instability facing Egypt in the last four years, the construction sector attained a growth of over 5% in 2013 against 3.3% in 2012 (Central Bank of Egypt-Egypt Economic Report). According to Egypt's Vision 2030: Sustainable Development Strategy; it is forecasted that the population in Egypt will reach to 140 million by 2050; which will consequently necessitate an increase in the percentage of the planning and built-up areas leading to the use of more construction sites, land areas to cover this alarmingly rapid demographical increase. In parallel, there will be more demand for materials, energy, and water resources to accommodate this fast growth in population and urban growth. Additionally, buildings contribute significantly to the amount of disposed municipal, and construction and demolition waste. Consequently, there is an urgent need to provide guidelines and strategies for the development of the construction sector as a catalyst to green building. Thus, the various developed green building rating systems worldwide such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology (BREEAM) in order to assess the potential impacts of the building on the environment, economy and society, play a vital role in defining the level of sustainability in the construction industry. This research evaluates various green building rating systems through a quantitative and qualitative comparative analysis. The basis of this analysis was on an explicit criteria framework. The assessed rating systems are: Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Methodology New Construction (BREEAM NC 2014); Comprehensive Assessment System for Built Environment Efficiency (CASBEE 2014) for Building New Construction; Excellence in Design for Greater Efficiencies by the International Finance Corporation (EDGE IFC) Homes v1.1, Pearl Rating System (PRS) Design and Construction by ESTIDAMA v1.0; Green Pyramid Rating System NC (GPRS); Global Sustainability Assessment System Building Typologies (GSAS v2.0); Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design NC (BD and C) (LEED v4.0); and TARSHEED Residential v1.0. The selection of rating systems relied on an explicit criterion. The next phase included the selection of a case study (new construction) in order to measure its performance using three rating systems, namely, LEED, TARSHEED, and GPRS. The outcome of this research is a set of recommendations to Egypt Green Building Council committee for the development of future versions TARSHEED rating system
Adsorption of heavy metals cations in wastewater using cement kiln dust by Mohamed Abdel Kareem El Zayat( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Greywater treatment using aquatic filtration for possible reuse in landscape irrigation by Lana Mahmoud( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Fresh water scarcity continues to present itself as an underlying global problem as we steadily approach 2025 (UN 2006). Egypt is no exception to the rule, facing several water pollution problems extending from all sectors in the country and negatively affecting water quality and public health. According to the Ministry of Water resources and irrigation (1997), the average water uses in the Egyptian household comprises 18% for shower and bath, 18% for toilet flushing, 8% for laundry, 14% for dishwashing and drinking, 10% for cooking, 30% for irrigation and 2% for other activities which makes onsite treatment and reuse of greywater an attractive option to bridge the gap between water demand and supply in Egypt and help build biophilia settlements that are ecological and sustainable. The main research aim of this work was to study the potential of water hyacinth for removal of organic pollutants and pathogens from residential greywater using aquatic filtration pilot scale system in order to yield water suitable for irrigation of residential lawns. The different experiments of the current work were conducted in five phases at the facilities of the American University in Cairo (AUC). In Phase I, synthetic greywater was formulated in the lab to run the different experiments of the study by mixing tab water with different chemicals that simulate the different contaminants commonly present in greywater and it was observed that the water quality parameters of the synthetic greywater stimulated in the current study were within the range of the values of water quality parameters reported in literature for light and heavy greywater. In phase II, water hyacinth, papyrus reed and common reed were used to investigate the effectiveness of treating synthetic greywater compared to a control (no plant condition). It was found that over the period of 19 days, water hyacinth was able to remove a total mass of 83 mg TDS (45% higher than the control sample), 0.5 mg PO4- (60% higher than the control sample), 53 mg COD (5.7% higher than the control sample) and 572 mg FC (44% higher than the control sample) and was able to achieve the lowest greywater normalized evaporation rate with a total of 0.114 liter of water per kg of plant wet mass per day (l/kg.d). Common reed was found most effective in treating organic and suspended pollutants, compared to water hyacinth and papyrus reed. However, the planting cost, removal operation and overall management is considered favorable to water hyacinth over the other two plant species. In phase III, the effect of different hydraulic loading rates on the treatment performance of synthetic greywater was investigated using similar wet densities of water hyacinth. it was observed that 20 days of experiment, water hyacinth in Reactor 5 (HLR = 0.29 m3/m2/d) was able to reduce the turbidity, TSS, COD and BOD5 of greywater from 176 NTU to 14 NTU+7 NTU, 294 mg/l to 20 mg/l+13.5 mg/l, 176 mg/l to 16 mg/l+12 mg/l and 102 mg/l to 7 mg/l+6 mg/l (on average basis), respectively. It was also observed that the operation of the treatment system at HLR of 0.29 m3/m2/d results in an effluent organic quality (BOD5 and COD) that complies with the limits reported in the Egyptian Code of Practice for Reuse in Irrigation; Category A (501-2015). Reactor 5 (HLR = 0.29 m3/m2/d) was also able to withstand hydraulic shock loading with a turbidity removal rate of 68.4%, TSS removal rate of 54.1%, COD removal rate of 39.8% for the first four hours and a removal efficiency of 86.8%, 63.9% and 80.6%, respectively for the next twenty hours. In phase IV, the effect of different wet densities of water hyacinth on the treatment of synthetic greywater was investigated using similar hydraulic loading rates. It was observed from the experiment that lasted 20 days that water hyacinth in Reactor 5 (Wet density = 4.345 kg/m2) was able to reduce the turbidity, TSS, COD and BOD5 of greywater from 28 NTU to 7 NTU+3.3, 20 mg/l to 4 mg/l+1.7 mg/l, 54 mg/l to 16 mg/l+4.1 mg/l and 37 mg/l to 10 mg/l+2.8 mg/l (on average basis), respectively. Water hyacinth in Reactor 4 (Wet density = 2.173 kg/m2) was also able to reduce the turbidity and TSS of greywater from an average of 28 NTU to 10 NTU+3.7 and from 20 mg/l to 5.5 mg/l+2.9 mg/l, respectively. In phase V, the performance of the aquatic filtration system in treating real greywater when using the optimum operating conditions obtained from Phase III and Phase IV was investigated. The greywater treatment system which operated for a period of 29 days at HLR (0.29 m3/m2/d) and highest wet plant density (2.173 kg/m2) was able to reduce the turbidity, TSS, COD and BOD5 of greywater from 82 NTU to 54 NTU+20 NTU, 52 mg/l to 34 mg/l+24 mg/l, 366 mg/l to 217 mg/l+71 mg/l and 222 mg/l to 129 mg/l+43 mg/l (on average basis), respectively. The validation of this synthetic effluent by comparison with real greywater demonstrates that the designed and constructed aquatic filtration system using water hyacinth is a promising, low-cost, low-tech greywater treatment system that can be run and maintained by unskilled operators. However, the improvement in treatment in the Water Hyacinth based system is of particular significance considering the strict effluent quality standards recently imposed by the Egyptian Code for Landscape Irrigation. Hence, future research (including scale economic studies) should be carried out to investigate the use of greywater at the community level with the optimization of different techniques that could further enhance the greywater effluent quality to the permissible level of 1st group (i.e. advanced treated water) as unrestricted water reuse in landscape irrigation according to the ‘‘Egyptian Guideline’’
Roadmap for Global Sustainability â#x80;#x94; Rise of the Green Communities by Salah el- Haggar( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Progressive increases in consumer demands along with aggressive industrial consumption led the world to proximate resource depletion, weather changes, soil and air degradation and water quality deterioration. We now know that the paradigm of production at the expense of human condition is not sustainable. This book briefly explains how we reached this situation and offers suggestions as to what can be done to overcome it. It invites the best entrepreneurial talent and scientific and technological know-how to develop a sustainable economy around sustainable communities, services, and sectors. A major obstacle previously identified by involved parties was the ability of accommodating for the emerging economic growth without causing harm to the environment, especially with resource depletion. This book provides the solution by creating a need to bring on a new revolution that preserves the rights of next generations to live in a healthy environment This Sustainability Revolution requires the integration of economic, environmental, and social factor as well as the practical aspects of implementing sustainability through green activities, which are discussed throughout the book. In this book, a globalization is proposed that encourages creativity and innovation towards sustainability. With this global sustainability approach (real globalization) both rich and poor will benefit from the global sustainability approach. This will close the gap between rich and poor. Developing countries could reap the benefit of current technology without undergoing many of the growing pains associated with development of these technologies. Governments are able to better work together towards common goals now that there is an advantage in cooperation, an improved ability to interact and coordinate, and a global awareness of issues. The book presents a sustainability roadmap to bring together various concepts, that have been dealt with independently by previous authors, and link them to establish the fundamental practical steps. The flow path and the direction for successful implementation of a sustainability roadmap are also discussed in detail in the book. For the first time, the authors use sustainable communities to create a better quality of life for residents while minimizing the use of the resources to meet current needs and ensure adequate resources for future generations. These green communities create new industries for the local economy and improve public health, which offers more hope for their citizens. Sustainable transportation, renewable energy, recycling, clean water, and urban forests help to make a more livable community and help to control the global climate change. They involve all citizens and incorporate local values into decision-making
 
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Sustainable industrial design and waste management : cradle-to-cradle for sustainable development
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People and pollution : cultural constructions and social action in Egypt
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El-Haggar, Salah.

El-Haggar, Salah M.‏

Haggar, Salah M. el-

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