WorldCat Identities

Palme, Klaus 1951-

Overview
Works: 21 works in 35 publications in 2 languages and 302 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other, dgs, Contributor, htt
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Klaus Palme
Gravitational biology I : gravity sensing and graviorientation in microorganisms and plants by Markus Braun( )

8 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book summarizes what is currently known about gravity sensing and response mechanisms in microorganisms, fungi, lower and higher plants; starting from the historical eye-opening experiments from the 19th century up to today's extremely rapid advancing cellular, molecular and biotechnological research. All forms of life are constantly exposed to gravity and it can be assumed that almost all organisms have developed sensors and respond in one way or the other to the unidirectional acceleration force,this books shows us some of these different ways. The book is written for plant biologists and microbiologists as well as scientists interested in space and gravitational biology."--Publisher's website
Auxin-Induced plasma membrane depolarization is regulated by Auxin transport and not by AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 by Ivan A Paponov( )

2 editions published between 2019 and 2020 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Novel small molecule modulators of plant growth and development identified by high-content screening with plant pollen by Roman Chuprov-Netochin( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Functional analysis of the arabidopsis thaliana CDPK-related kinase family : AtCRK1 regulates responses to continuous light by Abu Imran Baba( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase (CDPK)-Related Kinase family (CRKs) consists of eight members in Arabidopsis. Recently, AtCRK5 was shown to play a direct role in the regulation of root gravitropic response involving polar auxin transport (PAT). However, limited information is available about the function of the other AtCRK genes. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the Arabidopsis CRK genes, including transcription regulation, intracellular localization, and biological function. AtCRK transcripts were detectable in all organs tested and a considerable variation in transcript levels was detected among them. Most AtCRK proteins localized at the plasma membrane as revealed by microscopic analysis of 35S::cCRK-GFP (Green Fluorescence Protein) expressing plants or protoplasts. Interestingly, 35S::cCRK1-GFP and 35S::cCRK7-GFP had a dual localization pattern which was associated with plasma membrane and endomembrane structures, as well. Analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants revealed that AtCRK genes are important for root growth and control of gravitropic responses in roots and hypocotyls. While Atcrk mutants were indistinguishable from wild type plants in short days, Atcrk1-1 mutant had serious growth defects under continuous illumination. Semi-dwarf phenotype of Atcrk1-1 was accompanied with chlorophyll depletion, disturbed photosynthesis, accumulation of singlet oxygen, and enhanced cell death in photosynthetic tissues. AtCRK1 is therefore important to maintain cellular homeostasis during continuous illumination
Regulation of Polar Auxin Transport by AtPin1 in Arabidopsis Vascular Tissue by Leo Gälweiler( )

2 editions published between 1998 and 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lateral relocation of auxin efflux regulator PIN3 mediates tropism in Arabidopsis by Jiri Friml( )

2 editions published between 2002 and 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Variational attenuation correction in two-view confocal microscopy by Thorsten Falk( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Background<br><br>Absorption and refraction induced signal attenuation can seriously hinder the extraction of quantitative information from confocal microscopic data. This signal attenuation can be estimated and corrected by algorithms that use physical image formation models. Especially in thick heterogeneous samples, current single view based models are unable to solve the underdetermined problem of estimating the attenuation-free intensities.<br><br>Results<br><br>We present a variational approach to estimate both, the real intensities and the spatially variant attenuation from two views of the same sample from opposite sides. Assuming noise-free measurements throughout the whole volume and pure absorption, this would in theory allow a perfect reconstruction without further assumptions. To cope with real world data, our approach respects photon noise, estimates apparent bleaching between the two recordings, and constrains the attenuation field to be smooth and sparse to avoid spurious attenuation estimates in regions lacking valid measurements.<br><br>Conclusions<br><br>We quantify the reconstruction quality on simulated data and compare it to the state-of-the art two-view approach and commonly used one-factor-per-slice approaches like the exponential decay model. Additionally we show its real-world applicability on model organisms from zoology (zebrafish) and botany (Arabidopsis). The results from these experiments show that the proposed approach improves the quantification of confocal microscopic data of thick specimen
Data-driven modeling of intracellular auxin fluxes indicates a dominant role of the ER in controlling nuclear auxin uptake by Alistair Middleton( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: In plants, the phytohormone auxin acts as a master regulator of developmental processes and environmental responses. The best characterized process in the auxin regulatory network occurs at the subcellular scale, wherein auxin mediates signal transduction into transcriptional programs by triggering the degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressor proteins in the nucleus. However, whether and how auxin movement between the nucleus and the surrounding compartments is regulated remain elusive. Using a fluorescent auxin analog, we show that its diffusion into the nucleus is restricted. By combining mathematical modeling with time course assays on auxin-mediated nuclear signaling and quantitative phenotyping in single plant cell systems, we show that ER-to-nucleus auxin flux represents a major subcellular pathway to directly control nuclear auxin levels. Our findings propose that the homeostatically regulated auxin pool in the ER and ER-to-nucleus auxin fluxes underpin auxin-mediated downstream responses in plant cells
Settling for less: do statoliths modulate gravity perception? by Franck Anicet Ditengou( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Plants orientate their growth either towards (in roots) or away from (in shoots) the Earth's gravitational field. While we are now starting to understand the molecular architecture of these gravity response pathways, the gravity receptor remains elusive. This perspective looks at the biology of statoliths and suggests it is conceivable that their immediate environment may be tuned to modulate the strength of the gravity response. It then suggests how mutant screens could use this hypothesis to identify the gravity receptor
Flavonol-mediated stabilization of PIN efflux complexes regulates polar auxin transport by William Teale( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The transport of auxin controls the rate, direction and localization of plant growth and development. The course of auxin transport is defined by the polar subcellular localization of the PIN proteins, a family of auxin efflux transporters. However, little is known about the composition and regulation of the PIN protein complex. Here, using blue-native PAGE and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identify native PIN core transport units as homo- and heteromers assembled from PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, PIN4 and PIN7 subunits only. Furthermore, we show that endogenous flavonols stabilize PIN dimers to regulate auxin efflux in the same way as does the auxin transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). This inhibitory mechanism is counteracted both by the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid and by phosphomimetic amino acids introduced into the PIN1 cytoplasmic domain. Our results lend mechanistic insights into an endogenous control mechanism which regulates PIN function and opens the way for a deeper understanding of the protein environment and regulation of the polar auxin transport complex
Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal light-sheet microscopy of Arabidopsis roots by Tobias Meinert( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glutathione enhances auxin sensitivity in Arabidopsis roots by Taras Pasternak( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Root development is regulated by the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a strong non-enzymatic antioxidant found in plants but with a poorly understood function in roots. Here, Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GSH biosynthesis (cad2, rax1, and rml1) and plants treated with the GSH biosynthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) showed root growth inhibition, significant alterations in the root apical meristem (RAM) structure (length and cell division), and defects in lateral root formation. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms of GSH action showed that GSH deficiency modulated total ubiquitination of proteins and inhibited the auxin-related, ubiquitination-dependent degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and the transcriptional activation of early auxin-responsive genes. However, the DR5 auxin transcriptional response differed in root apical meristem (RAM) and pericycle cells. The RAM DR5 signal was increased due to the up-regulation of the auxin biosynthesis TAA1 protein and down-regulation of PIN4 and PIN2, which can act as auxin sinks in the root tip. The transcription auxin response (the DR5 signal and expression of auxin responsive genes) in isolated roots, induced by a low (0.1 µM) auxin concentration, was blocked following GSH depletion of the roots by BSO treatment. A higher auxin concentration (0.5 µM) offset this GSH deficiency effect on DR5 expression, indicating that GSH deficiency does not completely block the transcriptional auxin response, but decreases its sensitivity. The ROS regulation of GSH, the active GSH role in cell proliferation, and GSH cross-talk with auxin assume a potential role for GSH in the modulation of root architecture under stress conditions
Interplay of the two ancient metabolites auxin and MEcPP regulates adaptive growth by Jishan Jiang( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

AUX1-mediated root hair auxin influx governs SCFTIR1/AFB-type Ca2+ signaling by Julian Dindas( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Variational attenuation correction in two-view confocal microscopy by Thorsten Schmidt( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A tobacco homolog of DCN1 is involved in pollen development and embryogenesis by Julia Hosp( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Protocol: an improved and universal protocol for whole-mount immunolocalization in plants by Taras Pasternak( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Rapid advances in microscopy have boosted research on cell biology. However sample preparation enabling excellent reproducible tissue preservation and cell labeling for in depth microscopic analysis of inner cell layers, tissues and organs still represents a major challenge for immunolocalization studies. Here we describe a protocol for whole-mount immunolocalization of proteins which is applicable to a wide range of plant species. The protocol is improved and robust for optimal sample fixation, tissue clearing and multi-protein staining procedures and can be used in combination with simultaneous detection of specific sequences of nucleic acids. In addition, cell wall and nucleus labelling can be implemented in the protocol, thereby allowing a detailed analysis of morphology and gene expression patterns with single-cell resolution. Besides enabling accurate, high resolution and reproducible protein detection in expression and localization studies, the procedure takes a single working day to complete without the need for robotic equipment.<br><br>Keywords<br><br>Immunolocalization - Tissue multi-protein expression - Whole-mount - 3D reconstruction - Protein-protein interaction
Gravity sensing and graviorientation in microorganisms and plants by Markus Braun( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Gravitational biology I : gravity sensing and graviorientation in microorganisms and plants Gravity sensing and graviorientation in microorganisms and plants
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Gravity sensing and graviorientation in microorganisms and plants
Alternative Names
Klaus Palme wetenschapper

Palme, Klaus J. 1951-

Palme, Klaus Josef 1951-

Languages
English (32)

German (2)