WorldCat Identities

Stewart, Ian J.

Overview
Works: 12 works in 27 publications in 1 language and 205 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  History 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Classifications: JZ5588, 355.033
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ian J Stewart
Preventing the proliferation of WMDs : measuring the success of UN Security Council Resolution 1540 by Ian J Stewart( )

11 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This edited volume provides a fresh analysis for researcher and practitioners regarding United Nations Security Council resolution 1540, the status of its implementation, and its future by providing an original evaluation of progress in implementation and challenges faced during the resolution's first decade
The Gloucester Tabulae set : its discovery and interpretation by Ian J Stewart( Book )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A history of the dairy industry on the Atherton Tableland by Ian J Stewart( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Workshop : dual use export controls( )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although EU Regulation 428/2009 setting up a Community regime for the control of exports, transfer, brokering and transit of dual-use items system is in line with the main export control regimes and is seen as a model for others to follow, there are a number of ways in which the regulation could be enhanced and refined. Part One outlines the current state of play, purpose and implementation of the current regulation. In Part Two, against the backdrop of the European Commission's reform proposal, the effectiveness of the EU's dual-use export controls regime is explored further with regard to its potential contribution to international, national and human security, as well as their impact on EU economic and trade interests. The study concludes that the system's effectiveness could be improved in a number of ways, but that this requires an effort to mobilise political will at different levels and across different institutions within the EU and its Member States, and to enhance human resources, cooperation and capacity-building. The European Parliament should also give consideration on a regular basis to issues relating to the scope and implementation of the regulation, in order to ensure that the objectives continue to be achieved
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Burn Patients( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : The purpose of this study was to compare the Berlin definition to the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC) definition in determining the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and associated mortality in the critically ill burn population. Consecutive patients admitted to our institution with burn injury that required mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were included for analysis. Included patients (N = 891) were classified by both definitions. The median age, % TBSA burn, and injury severity score (interquartile ranges) were 35 (24-51), 25 (11-45), and 18 (9-26), respectively. Inhalation injury was present in 35.5%. The prevalence of ARDS was 34% using the Berlin definition and 30.5% using the AECC definition (combined acute lung injury and ARDS), with associated mortality rates of 40.9 and 42.9%, respectively. Under the Berlin definition, mortality rose with increased ARDS severity (14.6% no ARDS; 16.7% mild; 44% moderate; and 59.7% severe, P <0.001). By contrast, under the AECC definition increased mortality was seen only for ARDS category (14.7% no ARDS; 15.1% acute lung injury; and 46.0% ARDS, P <0.001). The mortality of the 22 subjects meeting the AECC, but not the Berlin definition was not different from patients without ARDS (P = .91). The Berlin definition better stratifies ARDS in terms of severity and correctly excludes those with minimal disease previously captured by the AECC
The Gloucester Tabulae set : its discovery and interpretation by Ian J Stewart( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Evaluation of the Cytosorb™ Hemoadsorptive Column in a PIG Model of Severe Smoke and Burn Injury( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: Introduction: Host inflammatory response to any form of tissue injury, including burn, trauma, or shock, has been well documented. After significant burns, cytokines can increase substantially within the first 24 h after injury and may contribute to subsequent organ failure. Hemoadsorption by cytokine-adsorbing columns may attenuate this maladaptive response, thereby improving outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility, technical safety, and efficacy of cytokine and myoglobin removal by early use of a cytokine absorbing column (CytoSorb) in a porcine model of smoke inhalation and burn injury. Methods: Anesthetized female Yorkshire pigs (n = 15) were injured by wood bark smoke inhalation and a 40% total body surface area deep burn and observed for 72 h or death. The animals were randomized to hemoadsorption treatment (n = 9) or a sham group (n = 6) before injury. A 6-h hemoadsorption or sham session was performed on days one, two, and three. Serum cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha) and myoglobin were measured systemically, locally in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and also in circulating blood before and after the adsorbing column to evaluate single pass clearance by the device. Results: Hemoadsorption caused significant removal of IL-1b, IL-6, IL-10, and myoglobin across the device mainly during the first run, ranging from 22% for IL-6 to 29% for IL-1b and 41% removal rates for myoglobin after 15 min of treatment. Systemic cytokine or myoglobin serum concentrations did not change. Conclusions: In a porcine model of smoke and burn injury, hemoadsorption using the CytoSorb cartridge did not result in significant systemic or pulmonary reductions in the measured cytokines or myoglobin despite efficient transmembrane reductions. Further investigations are needed to optimize the efficiency of mediator clearance to affect both circulating levels and clinically relevant outcomes. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Rhabdomyolysis among critically ill combat casualties( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : BACKGROUND: Rhabdomyolysis has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic injury, especially in the setting of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, rhabdomyolysis has not been systematically examined in a large cohort of combat casualties injured in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of casualties injured during combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan who were initially admitted to the intensive care unit from February 1, 2002, to February 1, 2011. Information on age, sex, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism of injury, shock index, creatine kinase, and serum creatinine were collected. These variables were examined via multivariate logistic and Cox regression analyses to determine factors independently associated with rhabdomyolysis, AKI, and death. RESULTS: Of 6, 011 admissions identified, a total of 2, 109 patients met inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. Rhabdomyolysis, defined as creatine kinase greater than 5, 000 U/L, was present in 656 subjects (31.1%). Risk factors for rhabdomyolysis identified on multivariable analysis included injuries to the abdomen and extremities, increased ISS, male sex, explosive mechanism of injury, and shock index greater than 0.9. After adjustment, patients with rhabdomyolysis had a greater than twofold increase in the odds of AKI. In the analysis for mortality, rhabdomyolysis was significantly associated with death until AKI was added, at which point it lost statistical significance. CONCLUSION: We found that rhabdomyolysis is associated with the development of AKI in combat casualties. While rhabdomyolysis was strongly associated with mortality on the univariate model and in conjunction with both ISS and age, it was not associated with mortality after the inclusion of AKI. This suggests that the effect of rhabdomyolysis on mortality may be mediated by AKI. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level III. Abstract : Supplemental digital content is available in the text
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Burn Patients( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : The purpose of this study was to compare the Berlin definition to the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC) definition in determining the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and associated mortality in the critically ill burn population. Consecutive patients admitted to our institution with burn injury that required mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were included for analysis. Included patients (N = 891) were classified by both definitions. The median age, % TBSA burn, and injury severity score (interquartile ranges) were 35 (24-51), 25 (11-45), and 18 (9-26), respectively. Inhalation injury was present in 35.5%. The prevalence of ARDS was 34% using the Berlin definition and 30.5% using the AECC definition (combined acute lung injury and ARDS), with associated mortality rates of 40.9 and 42.9%, respectively. Under the Berlin definition, mortality rose with increased ARDS severity (14.6% no ARDS; 16.7% mild; 44% moderate; and 59.7% severe, P <0.001). By contrast, under the AECC definition increased mortality was seen only for ARDS category (14.7% no ARDS; 15.1% acute lung injury; and 46.0% ARDS, P <0.001). The mortality of the 22 subjects meeting the AECC, but not the Berlin definition was not different from patients without ARDS (P = .91). The Berlin definition better stratifies ARDS in terms of severity and correctly excludes those with minimal disease previously captured by the AECC
Recommendations for a transparent and detailed reporting system on arms exports within the EU and to third countries : in-depth analysis( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The EU’s annual report on arms export control presently lags behind the national reports of many countries. The introduction of a searchable online database will be a substantial step in increasing the user-friendliness of the report. This paper makes recommendations with regard to readability, comprehensiveness and comparability. Perhaps the principal recommendation is that steps be taken to harmonise the data provided under the categories ‘licensed value’ and ‘actual exports’, which are presently not consistently interpreted across the EU. The main argument of this paper is that the EU should move towards using data visualisation to complement the lengthy statistical tables in the annual report and thus make it more readable. The EU and its Member States should also explore opportunities to enhance the data contained in the report to include additional identified data fields, narrative sections to complement the statistical data, and disaggregated data on licence denials. In identifying additional data fields that could be included, the paper also examines the challenges associated with the provision of the data in each case
An eleventh-century bone 'tabula' set from Gloucester by Ian J Stewart( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Export controls and India by Rajiv Nayan( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Languages
English (27)