WorldCat Identities

Matenga, Edward

Overview
Works: 11 works in 25 publications in 2 languages and 132 library holdings
Genres: Television series  Documentary television programs 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Edward Matenga
The soapstone birds of Great Zimbabwe : symbols of a nation by Edward Matenga( Book )

5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeological figurines from Zimbabwe by Edward Matenga( Book )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Present and past : ceramics and homesteads : an ehtnoarchaeological project in the Buhera district, Zimbabwe by Anders Lindahl( Book )

6 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The soapstone birds of Great Zimbabwe : archaeological heritage, religion and politics in postcolonial Zimbabwe and the return of cultural property by Edward Matenga( Book )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At least eight soapstone carvings of birds furnished a shrine, Great Zimbabwe, in the 19th century. This large stonewalled settlement, once a political and urban centre, had been much reduced for four centuries, although the shrine continued to operate as local traditions dictated. The Zimbabwe Birds were handed down from a past that has only been partially illuminated by archaeological inquiry and ethnography, as has the site as such. This thesis publishes the first detailed catalogue of the Birds and attempts to reconstruct their provenance at the site based on the earliest written accounts. A modern history of the Birds unfolds when the European settlers removed them from the site in dubious transactions, claiming them as rewards of imperial conquest. As the most treasured objects from Great Zimbabwe, the fate of the Birds has been intertwined with that of the site in a matrix of contested meanings and ownership. This thesis explores how the meanings of cultural objects have a tendency to shift and to be ephemeral, demonstrating the ability of those in power to appropriate and determine such meanings. In turn, this has a bearing on ownership claims, and gives rise to an "authorized heritage discourse" syndrome. The forced migrations of the Zimbabwe Birds within the African continent and to Europe and their subsequent return to their homeland decades later are characterised by melodramatic episodes of manoeuvring by traders, politicians and theologians, and of the return of stolen property cloaked as an amicable barter deal, or a return extolled as an act of generosity. International doctrines that urge the return of cultural property are influenced by Western hegemonic ideologies. Natural justice is perverted, as stolen property acquires a (superior) significance in its new context, which merits the extinction of the original provenance. This leaves "generosity" and goodwill as the promises of the future, holding the fate of one Zimbabwe Bird still kept in exile in South Africa
Quest for King Solomon's gold( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bernstein leads us on a 4,000-mile journey in search of the lost gold of King Solomon. He begins in Negev, Israel, where he does find ancient mines, but they are veined with copper, not gold. Of all the rulers mentioned in the Bible, King Solomon was purportedly the wisest ... and the richest! The reason? His access to an estimated 24 tons of gold each year. According to the Bible, the source of his legendary wealth was the gold mines located in the mysterious land of Ophir. But nobody knows where Ophir was. Some scholars think it was in Africa, so Josh retraces the ancient mariners' path in a slow journey across the Red Sea to Zimbabwe. There, he travels down a mine-shaft more than 2,000 feet below ground level to see workers extracting gold. Josh also visits the ruins of Great Zimbabwe, where German explorer Karl Mauch believed he had found Ophir. Treasure seekers ransacked the ancient city, which was scientifically excavated much later, in 1929, by Gertrude Caton-Thompson. Josh winds up in Ethiopia at the site reputed to be the home of the Queen of Sheba, and joins gold miners working from a tradition thousands of years old
Anthropomorphic figure, soapstone, Great Zimbabwe by Edward Matenga( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Images of a fertility complex : Iron Age figurine from Zimbabwe by Edward Matenga( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conservation history of the Great Enclosure, Great Zimbabwe, with reference to the proposed restoration of a lintel entrance by Edward Matenga( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stenen getuigenissen Zimbabwe, heden en verleden (1) by D. N Beach( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in Dutch and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Budiriro Burial excavations, Harare, May/June 1990 by Edward Matenga( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Changing perceptions : presenting heritage( Visual )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.77 (from 0.27 for Quest for ... to 0.99 for Stenen get ...)

Alternative Names
Matenga, Edward 1963-

Matenga, Edward Jasper

Languages
English (24)

Dutch (1)