WorldCat Identities

Krulak, Charles C.

Overview
Works: 13 works in 14 publications in 1 language and 37 library holdings
Classifications: UB210, 359.960973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Charles C Krulak Publications about Charles C Krulak
Publications by  Charles C Krulak Publications by Charles C Krulak
Most widely held works about Charles C Krulak
 
Most widely held works by Charles C Krulak
From the horse's mouth : selected thoughts on small-unit leadership by Ted McKeldin ( Book )
2 editions published between 1999 and 2004 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Commandant's planning guidance (CPG) by United States ( Book )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Document outlining Gen. Charles C. Krulak's strategic direction for the Marine Corps
The importance of integrity, loyalty, and loyal dissent by United States Naval Academy Leaders' Forum ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Lieutenant General Charles Krulak, USMC, CG, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, HQ, speaks to the Brigade of Midshipmen about what makes a leader
Status of U.S. Armed Forces ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Testimony presented by Henry Shelton (Chairman, JCS), Dennis Reimer (CoS, Army), Michael Ryan (CoS, Air Force), J.L. Johnson (Chief of Naval Operations) and Charles Krulak (Cmdt, Marine Corps) in support of approriations requests for the military services. Issues addressed include weapons systems, modernization, shipbuilding, retirement costs, and many others
The Strategic Corporal: Leadership in the Three Block War ( )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The African sun had just risen above the hills surrounding the sprawling city and sent its already dazzling rays streaming into the dusty alleyway. Corporal Hernandez felt the sun on his face and knew that today would, again, be sweltering. He was a squad leader in 2d Platoon, Lima Company and had, along with his men, spent a sleepless night on the perimeter. For the past week his platoon had provided security to the International Relief Organization (IRO) workers who manned one of three food distribution points in the American Sector of Tugala -- the war-tom capital of Orange -- a Central African nation wracked by civil unrest and famine. The situation in Orange had transfixed the world for nearly two years. Bloody tribal fighting had led first to the utter collapse of the government and economy, and ultimately, to widespread famine. International efforts to quell the violence and support the teetering government had failed, and the country had plunged into chaos. The United States had finally been compelled to intervene. A forward deployed Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) was ordered to assist the efforts of the ineffective Regional Multi-National Force (RMNF) and the host of international humanitarian assistance organizations that struggled to alleviate the suffering. The MEU's arrival had stabilized the situation and allowed the precious relief supplies to finally reach the people who needed them most. The Food Distribution Point (FDP) manned by 2d Platoon serviced over 5,000 people daily. The Marines had, at first, been shocked at the extent of the suffering, by the constant stream of malnourished men and women, and by the distended bellies and drawn faces of the children. The flow of food and medical supplies had, however, had a dramatic impact. The grim daily death tolls had slowly begun to decrease and the city had begun to recover some sense of normalcy. Within a month the lives of the Marines had assumed a sort of dull routine
Operational Maneuver from the Sea ( )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In Only the Paranoid Survive, former Intel Corporation president and CEO Andy Groves described how his business faced radical changes and not only survived but prospered. "Whether a company became a winner or a loser was related to its degree of adaptability." The key factor is recognizing and taking advantage of strategic inflection points. He described a strategic inflection point as "a time in the life of a business when its fundamentals are about to change. . .They are full-scale changes in the way business is conducted, so that simply adopting new technology or fighting the competition as you used to may be insufficient." The Joint Strategic Review, Quadrennial Defense Review, and National Defense Panel each indicated that the Armed Forces have reached a strategic inflection point in the area of national security. The next century promises to be a time when emerging technologies coupled with an agile mindset will, if exploited, fundamentally alter and substantially increase our warfighting capability. Despite the recent downturn in Asian economies, leading economists continue to predict that by 2020 both China and India will emerge as trading superpowers, and the global economic center of gravity will shift from west to east. In that same year, eight of the ten largest economies will lie around the rim of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Almost every nation is becoming interdependent in the global marketplace. They compete for scarce resources--notably oil--to maintain economic expansion. Such growth is increasing the ability of emerging states to respond to security threats militarily with high-tech systems and weapons of mass destruction. History has repeatedly proven that this mix of highly charged competing economies, limited natural resources, and proliferation is a recipe for regional instability
FutureWar by Michael Ignatieff ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In light of the Sept. 11 events, the program looks at old and new military technologies and weapons platforms that will fight new kinds of "enemies": terrorists, chemical and biological attacks. The digitized battlefield, spy satellites, B-2 bomber, Longbow helicopters, and Exercise Urban Warrior are featured. The camera also follows new Marine Corps recruits through their basic training. Includes commentary by Charles Krulak and Robert H. Scales
Doctrine for Joint Force Integration ( )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
As we approach the 21st century, there will be no shortage of challenges for the Armed Forces of our Nation. These challenges will be the result of a world that is currently undergoing a metamorphosis. Today we see numerous emerging countries experiencing enormous economic growth. With this new economic growth comes a commensurate ability to procure military power. The diffusion of technology and a burgeoning world arms market make available for procurement some of the latest high tech weaponry and, for those who desire them, possibly even weapons of mass destruction. At the same time we see this shifting balance in economic and military power, we continue to see the world's resources becoming more scarce. The competition for them always has been and always will be a dominating theme in international relations. This mix of emerging economies, competition for resources, and new military might is a proven recipe for instability
A Matter of Strategic Focus ( Book )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We stand today at the trail-head that leads to the 21st century. The world ahead appears to be full of promise and opportunity -- and it is. The United States is engaged around the world with market economies that are open, growing, and flourishing. An exponential growth in technology is enhancing our lives and enabling us to master the art of international engagement. Things have never looked better. Or have they? In many ways, our situation today mirrors the one in which we found ourselves after World War II. As we were then, we are now -- the sole superpower, dominant in the world marketplace, militarily without peer -- the only nation capable of winning a war anywhere on the planet. Just as we did then, we now face important decisions concerning the defense structure with which we will maintain our place in the world and ensure our continued security. In 1945, with no clear threat, we felt safe in setting aside a significant amount of our military capability to use the money elsewhere. Today, we again have difficulty discerning our threats and once again ponder the nation's needs with respect to military forces. But in the decade after World War II, we came to learn that much in the world required our use of force. We learned it the hard way when we committed a hollow force to the Korean peninsula. We learned then, as perhaps we are learning now, that one clear victory -- in war or in Cold War -- cannot protect our worldwide interests or relieve us of our responsibility of vigilance against the dark forces of this world. This comparative analysis leads us to the question of our day: how should we build and maintain our national security posture for the 21st century? The answer lies in the expectations we have of our forces and of the use of those forces. To define these expectations, we must answer three questions: Why will we fight? Where will we fight? Whom will we fight?
Lieutenant General Charles C. Krulak speech at Leaders' Forum by United States Naval Academy Leaders' Forum ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Lieutenant General Charles C. Krulak, USMC, speaks to the Brigade of Midshipmen about his experiences in the Gulf War. He speaks about leading the 2nd Marine Division and the US Army's Tiger Brigade thru two minefields and how the Gulf War was successful due to the leadership of all military divisions
Lt Gen Krulak speech at Leaders' Forum by United States Naval Academy Leaders' Forum ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
General Charles C. Krulak, USMA, speaks to the Brigade of Midshipmen about what makes a leader
 
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Languages
English (14)