WorldCat Identities

Southeastern Native American Documents Collection (GALILEO (Georgia statewide project))

Overview
Works: 1,630 works in 1,638 publications in 1 language and 1,678 library holdings
Genres: Treaties  Resolutions (Law)  Trials, litigation, etc  Proclamations  Census data  Claims  Legal instruments 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Southeastern Native American Documents Collection (GALILEO (Georgia statewide project))
Letter, 1816 May 14, War Department to Rev[erend] C[yrus] Kingsbury by William Harris Crawford( )

1 edition published in 1816 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Copy of a letter dated May 14, 1816 from Secretary of War William H. Crawford to American Board missionary Cyrus Kingsbury in response to Kingsbury's request for aid in establishing schools in the Cherokee Nation. Crawford reports that President Madison approves of the project, and he will give aid within the limits of the law. Crawford sets forth instructions for the application and receipt of supplies and equipment for the schools and informs Kingsbury that the president expects an annual report on their progress
[Letter] 1799 Jun. 24, Knoxville, [Tennessee, to] Cap[tain] Edm[un]d Butler by Tennessee( )

1 edition published in 1799 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter written by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) to introduce Reverend Lyman Potter to Captain EdmundButler. Sevier explains that Mr. Potter has business in the Cherokee Nation to discuss with Captain Butler
[Letter] June 22, 1839, Washington City DC, [to] E. Hyatts by William Holland Thomas( )

5 editions published in 1839 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter, dated June 20, 1839, was written by William Holland Thomas to H.P. King at Indian Town. Thomas told King that he was unsure when he will be able to return home and told him to collect what money he can. Thomas said that he would return home as soon as he could furnish his mother with what she needed. He asked King to tell Benjamin Parks that he had collected a part of his pension, and would collect the rest upon his return
Documents in relation to the validity of the Cherokee treaty of 1835 ... Letters and other papers relating to Cherokee affairs: being a reply to sundry publications authorized by John Ross by Elias Boudinot( )

1 edition published in 1838 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This publication, presented before the United States Senate in 1838, is a set of letters and articles related to the Treaty of New Echota (1835), narrated by Elias Boudinot, the original editor of the Cherokee Phoenix. In resigning his post as editor of the Phoenix, Boudinot sets forth the basis for conflict between rival factions of Cherokee leadership -- the Treaty Party or Ridge Party and the Anti-Treaty Party or Ross Party. Boudinot, a member of the pro-treaty group, utilizes various documents to explain the motives of the removal treaty signers, and in so doing, he criticizes Principal Chief John Ross for misleading the Cherokee people by fostering their hopes in a lost cause. Boudinot includes letters and addresses by Ross and himself relative to strife amongst the parties and a failed attempt at resolution as well as correspondence between himself and the Chief
The case of the Cherokee Indians against the State of Georgia. Argued and determined at the Supreme Court of the United States, January term, 1831 by Richard Peters( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Richard Peters gives an explanation of the ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Cherokee Nation v. State of Georgia (1831). Peters contends that the court was correct in ruling that such a case was not within the court's legal jurisdiction since the Cherokee Nation is not an independent and foreign state. He points to treaties and compacts between the Cherokees and the United States in order to support this decision, particularly the Treaty of Hopewell (1785), and he disagrees with William Wirt, counsel for the Cherokees, who argues to the contrary. Although Peters supports the court's ruling on this matter, he professes sympathy for the Cherokee cause and believes that the Cherokees have been wronged by Georgia and the United States
[Letter], 1819 Sept. 3, Department of War to Rev[erend] Samuel Worcester, Sec[retar]y of the Amer[ican] Board of Commissioners for For[eig]n Missions by John C Calhoun( )

1 edition published in 1819 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Copy of a letter wherein John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, writes to Reverend Samuel Worcester, Corresponding Secretary of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions and missionary to the Cherokees, about an enclosed letter pertaining to the views of President Monroe, September 3, 1819. The enclosed letter appears in the Southeastern Native American Documents Database as ch042
Indian notes( )

in Undetermined and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document consists of the words "Indian Notes" and a page of handwriting in an unidentified Native American language
Cherokee reservations : (to accompany bill H.R. no 825): February 13, 1857 by United States( )

1 edition published in 1857 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mr. Todd from the Committee of Indian Affairs, reports to the House of Representatives on February 13, 1857 about the controversy surrounding Cherokee life-estate reservees and various treaties, including the treaty of 1835. Petitioners from Tennessee and citizens from other Southern states are seeking relief from law suits related to the reservations promised to the Cherokees in the treaties of 1817 and 1819
Resolutions of the National Council of the Cherokee Chiefs at Eustinallee 1804 April 4-10 by Cherokee Nation( )

1 edition published in 1804 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document outlines various resolutions passed by the National Council of the Cherokee Chiefs between the dates of April 4-10, 1804. Resolutions include that the six stands for houses of entertainment on the Cumberland Road be leased for five years to Thomas N. Clark, Sampson Williams, and Hugh Beatty, and that the rent shall be two hundred dollars for each stand. Also resolved, that the Moravian ministers residing near Mr. James Vann may continue in the Nation until December, 25, 1804 and at that time will be reviewed to remain if they proceed in the education of said Nation's children. Further, the Nation agrees to lease a salt peter cave near the boundary line of Tellico and that said cave be leased for five years
Cherokee Indians : memorial of a delegation of the Cherokee tribe of Indians by Cherokee Nation( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is an edited collection of documents related to the removal of the Cherokee Indians. The preface to the collection contends that any gain in territory for individual states through a disregard of treaty agreements will mar the honor of the United States. A message from John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, presented to the National Council and Committee of that nation in July of 1830, discusses the impact of Georgia extending its oppressive laws over the Cherokee territory and President Jackson's refusal to interfere. He suggests that the nation organize for further legal effort in the hope that the U.S. will eventually honor its agreements. Also included is an address by the Council and Committee of the Cherokee Nation to the people of the United States, a final plea for aid against forcible removal. The Cherokees elaborate on the legal efforts of the nation to avoid removal, such as encouraging Jackson and Congress to uphold treaties and laws that would protect the Cherokees from the encroachment of Georgia. The address examines the political relationship between whites and Cherokees from first contact to the present in order to show the legitimacy of the Cherokees' case. They also emphasize that the majority of their people do not want to emigrate and that this has been publicly misrepresented to further political aims. The address is followed by an article from the Massachusetts Journal concerning Andrew Jackson and the Indians which criticizes the President for not doing his duty in upholding U.S. laws and shows the hypocrisy of Georgia for desiring to recognize the fraudulent Treaty of Indian Springs (U.S. and Creeks, 1825) but refusing to abide by official compacts with the Cherokees. Lastly, the opinion of William Wirt, former U.S. Attorney General, dated June 20, 1830, is presented. Wirt argues that the Cherokee Nation is a sovereign nation, that it is not within the jurisdiction of Georgia, that Georgia has no right to extend its laws over the Cherokees and that the laws of Georgia are unconstitutional and void
[Letter] 1826 Nov. 15, Valley Towns, [North Carolina to] James Barbour, Sec[retar]y of War by Evan Jones( )

1 edition published in 1826 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a letter from Evan Jones, a Baptist missionary at the Valley Towns (North Carolina) of the Cherokee Nation, to James Barbour, Secretary of War (1825-1828), dated November 15, 1826. Jones communicates information to Barbour relative to the progress of various industries in the Cherokee Nation, most notably the establishment of several mills. The improvements have been made under the direction of the Board of Managers of the Baptist General Convention and also include a well-attended school. Jones also remarks on the general "progress" of the Cherokees with respect to Christianity and the "civilized arts."
[Proclamation] 1833 Jan. 14, Georgia to Charles C. Mills by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1833 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document, dated January 14, 1833, is a printed proclamation from Wilson Lumpkin, Governor of Georgia (1831-1835), to Charles C. Mills, Principal Keeper of the Penitentiary, and possibly intended for publication. Lumpkin directs the release of two missionaries, Samuel A. Worcester and Elizur Butler, who had been imprisoned for illegally dwelling in the Cherokee territory while refusing to take an oath of allegiance to Georgia. Lumpkin explains his reasons for remitting the sentences of the two men, including fervent appeals by citizens of the Union, but strenuously reasserts the "evil" of their deed. He further asserts that his decision was based on the missionaries' decision to leave their case to "the magnanimity of the state." Despite this characterization of events, the case had already been taken before the Supreme Court (Worcester v. Georgia) and decided in their favor in 1832
Letter of the Secretary of the Interior to the Chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs, communicating amendments to the Cherokee treaty concluded July 9, 1868 by United States( )

1 edition published in 1870 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Legal proceedings dated June 2, 1870 titled "Letter of the Secretary of the Interior to the Chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs, Communicating Amendments to the Cherokee treaty concluded July 9, 1868". Included are proposed amendments and responses to them from the Cherokee Delegation. The treaties of 1828 and 1835 are mentioned
Extracts from a letter, 1817 Mar. 2, Washington City to John C. Calhoun, Sec[retar]y of War by Samuel Worcester( )

1 edition published in 1817 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Copied extract of a letter wherein Reverend Samuel Worcester, Corresponding Secretary of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions and missionary to the Cherokees, writes to John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, to inform him, with regard to Indian civilization and culture, that views and dispositions of the President are in full accordance with those of the Board. The Board in which Samuel Worcester is associated deals mainly with Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Creeks, March 2, 1817
Opinion on the right of the State of Georgia to extend her laws over the Cherokee Nation by William Wirt( )

1 edition published in 1830 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

William Wirt, attorney for the Cherokee Nation and U.S. Attorney General (1817-1829), sets forth an argument for the right of the Cherokees to their lands east of the Mississippi River and against the extension of the laws of Georgia over the Cherokee territory. Wirt outlines the history of negotiations between the U.S. and the Cherokee Nation to establish the fact that the Cherokee Nation is a sovereign state with its own laws and that it is not within the jurisdiction of the State of Georgia. Wirt goes on to say that Georgia's actions are unconstitutional and in violation of solemn treaties made by the United States
Letter, 1818 July 15, Department of War to Jer[emia]h Evarts [and] Rev. Elias Cornelius by John C Calhoun( )

1 edition published in 1818 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Copy of a letter wherein John C. Calhoun writes to Jeremiah Evarts and Reverend Elias Cornelius to inform them that Congress is in control of the public land that was once Indian territory and will dictate where the missionary schools may be established after the extinguishment of the Indian title. He informs them that the four youths, which accompany them on their way to a school in Connecticut, will be allowed a sum of one hundred dollars per year for four years, July 15, 1818
[Letter], 1858 Mar. 1, Washington City [to] Jacob Thompson, Secretary of the Interior by William Holland Thomas( )

2 editions published in 1858 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letter dated March 1, 1858 from William H. Thomas to Jacob Thompson, Secretary of the Interior, regarding the status of Cherokee Indians as citizens of the state of North Carolina and their inclusion in the 1850 census. Thomas also discusses the implications of the treaties of 1817, 1819, 1835, and 1846 in determining the status of the Cherokees in North Carolina. Thomas was the legal representative of the Eastern Cherokees of North Carolina
[Letter] 1799 June 24, [to] the warriors & chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Tennessee( )

1 edition published in 1799 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a letter written to the Warriors and Chiefs of the Cherokee Nation by Governor John Sevier (1796-1801, 1803-1809) on June 24, 1799. In the letter, Sevier tells the Cherokees thatReverend Lyman Potter has offered his services to teach education, religion, and the fine arts to their people. Sevier praises Potter and gives hisrecommendation to the Cherokee of Potter's qualifications
Letter, 1817 July 26, Department of War, [Washington, D.C. to] David B. Mitchell by George Graham( )

1 edition published in 1817 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This letter dated July 26, 1817 is from acting Secretary of War George Graham (1815-1818), and is directed to David B. Mitchell, agent to the Creek Indians (1817-1821), and Governor of Georgia (1809-1813, 1815-1817). Graham writes to inform Mitchell that Elias Cornelius, head of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, wishes to visit the Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw and Choctaw nations to determine what interest there might be in establishing missionary schools within those nations. Graham indicates that such schools would receive aid from the War Department in the same way it has supported Reverend Cyrus Kingsbury's efforts in the Cherokee nation. The proposed schools would teach pupils to read and write in English, as well as agricultural skills and the "domestic arts
[Letter] 1795 Sept. 29, Chickasaw Nation by Piomingo( )

1 edition published in 1795 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a copy of a letter, dated September 29, 1795, by Chickasaw chief Piomingo (indicated in this letter as Opy Omingo and Opoia mingo) that was written to General James Robertson and sent to Colonel David Henley. Piomingo wrote this letter as a plea to the United States government for assistance. Hostility existed between the Chickasaws and the Creeks, and the letter described an attack by the Creek on the Chickasaw Nation. Although the Chickasaw were able to hold off and defeat the Creek, they endured considerable losses. Piomingo urged Robertson to think of Chickasaws as the brothers of Americans and that brothers should want to help each other in times of need. The Chickasaw chief asked for troops and provisions to be sent to his nation
 
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Alternative Names
GALILEO (Georgia statewide project). Southeastern Native American Documents Collection

Native American Documents Collection (GALILEO (Georgia statewide project))

Languages
English (25)