WorldCat Identities

Ridgeway, Greg 1973-

Overview
Works: 45 works in 110 publications in 1 language and 7,911 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV7438.L7, 363.33
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Greg Ridgeway
Today's police and sheriff recruits : insights from the newest members of America's law enforcement community by Laura Werber Castaneda( )

11 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2,057 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For much of the past decade, police and sheriff's departments faced considerable challenges in attracting and retaining recruits, such that many departments struggled to maintain their size. Although the economic downturn has altered this situation, police and sheriff's departments should expect that the tight labor market of the past decade will return. This volume summarizes a 2008-2009 survey fielded to recent police officer and sheriff's deputy recruits nationwide. The survey asked recruits why they chose a career in law enforcement, why they chose the particular agency that they joined, what they felt were the downsides of a career in law enforcement, and what could be done to improve their department's recruiting efforts. In discussing the survey results, the authors focus on how understanding modern recruits can help departments refine their recruitment practices and develop a workforce well suited to community-oriented policing
Cincinnati Police Department traffic stops : applying RAND's framework to analyze racial disparities by Greg Ridgeway( )

10 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,999 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2002, the Cincinnati Police Department (CPD) joined with other agencies and organizations to improve police-community relations in the city. This report focuses on the analysis of racial disparities in traffic stops in Cincinnati. The authors find no evidence of racial differences between the stops of black and those of similarly situated nonblack drivers, but some issues can exacerbate the perception of racial bias
Strategies for disrupting illegal firearms markets : a case study of Los Angeles by Greg Ridgeway( )

9 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Could a data-driven, problem-solving approach yield new interventions to disrupt local, illegal gun markets serving criminals, gang members, and juveniles in Los Angeles? Law enforcement can analyze patterns in crime-gun data to trace illicit firearm acquisition, use community-based interventions to stem the illegal flow, and use retail ammunition-purchase records in identifying prohibited firearm possessors
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2009-2010 report by Terry Fain( )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 629 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program⁰́₉s funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA⁰́₉s success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their tenth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009⁰́₃2010 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2010-2011 report by Terry Fain( )

5 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 547 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

California's Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act was designed to provide a stable funding source for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among at-risk and young offenders. It provides funds to counties to add evidence-based programs and services for juvenile probationers identified with higher needs for special services than those received by routine probationers, at-risk youth who have not entered the probation system but who live or attend school in areas of high crime or who have other factors that potentially predispose them to criminal activities, and youth in juvenile halls and camps. The Corrections Standards Authority is required to submit annual reports to the California state legislature measuring the program's success for six outcome measures: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also measure supplemental outcomes. Results reflect the continuing collaboration between the evaluators and the Los Angeles County Probation Department to modify programs based on the integration of evaluation findings and effective juvenile justice practices. Differences in outcomes between program participants and comparison-group youth are relatively small, although county-developed supplemental outcomes tend to be more favorable than state-mandated big six outcomes
Analyses for the initial implementation of the inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system by Grace M Carter( )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 543 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress mandated that Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) implement a Prospective Payment System (PPS) for inpatient rehabilitation. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS, the successor agency to HCFA) issued the final rule governing such a PPS on August 7, 2001 and the system went into effect on January 1, 2002. This report details the analyses that RAND performed to support HCFA's efforts to design, develop, and implement the PPS. It describes RAND's research on new function-related groups, comorbidities, unusual cases, facility-level adjustments, outlier payments, facility-level adjustments, and assessment instruments. In addition, it presents RAND's recommendations concerning the payment system and discusses the researchers' plans for further research on the monitoring and refinement of the PPS
Reducing gun violence : Operation Ceasefire in Los Angeles( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 185 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of racial disparities in the New York Police Department's stop, question, and frisk practices by Greg Ridgeway( Book )

7 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 156 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Raw statistics for encounters between New York City police officers and pedestrians suggest large racial disparities--89 percent of 2006 stops involved nonwhites. The New York City Police Department asked RAND to help it understand this and identify recommendations for addressing potential problems. RAND researchers analyzed 2006 pedestrian-police encounters, finding small racial differences in rates of frisk, search, use of force, and arrest
Police-community relations in Cincinnati( Book )

10 editions published between 2005 and 2009 in English and held by 156 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As part of a 2002 collaborative agreement between the Cincinnati Police Department (CPD), the American Civil Liberties Union, and the Fraternal Order of Police, the RAND Corporation annually assesses whether the parties are achieving their goals of improving police-community relations in Cincinnati. Specifically, the parties aim to ensure that police officers and community members become proactive partners in community problem-solving; build relationships of respect, cooperation, and trust within and between police and communities; improve education, oversight, monitoring, hiring practices, and accountability of CPD; ensure fair, equitable, and courteous treatment for all; and create methods to establish the public's understanding of police policies and procedures and recognition of exceptional service in an effort to foster support for the police. This fourth report analyzes a follow-up wave of surveys of the community, officers, and those involved in the complaint processes; reviews statistical compilations, motor-vehicle stops, and videotaped citizen-police interactions; and contains the final assessment of the progress toward the goals of the collaborative agreement. The authors conclude that CPD is not the same as the department that policed Cincinnati in 2001. Policy changes, oversight, and a variety of reforms have produced a department that polices differently than it had in 2001. The authors report reduced crime, small but positive changes in the community's perception of the department, and no evidence of racial bias in traffic stops. While the trends appear positive, without a concerted effort to ameliorate the disparate impact of these policies, it seems likely that black Cincinnati residents will remain less satisfied with policing services than will their white counterparts
Strategies for improving officer recruitment in the San Diego Police Department( Book )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 131 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The San Diego Police Department (SDPD) has been operating below its authorized size in recent years. To bridge its personnel gap, the department needs to maximize its recruiting while minimizing officer attrition. To accomplish this goal, the department sought assistance from RAND to improve its recruiting efforts and suggest ways to improve the diversity of its recruits. This monograph describes RAND's effort to assist SDPD's recruiting program
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2007-2008 report by Terry Fain( Book )

4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program's funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA's success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their fifth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2007-2008 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2008-2009 report by Terry Fain( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program's funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA's success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their ninth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2008-2009 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act( )

in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

RAND electronically distributed documents( )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Executive summary of analyses for the initial implementation of the inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system by Grace M Carter( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress mandated that Health CareFinancing Administration (HCFA) implement a Prospective Payment System (PPS)for inpatient rehabilitation. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services(CMS, the successor agency to HCFA) issued the final rule governing such aPPS on August 7, 2001. This report summarizes the research that RAND performed to support HCFA's efforts to design, develop, and implement thePPS. It describes RAND's research on new function-related groups, comorbidities, unusual cases, facility-level adjustments, outlier payments, facility-level adjustm
Assessing racial profiling more credibly by Greg Ridgeway( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Numerous studies have used data collected by law enforcement agencies to show whether or not racial profiling is occurring in urban traffic stops. But such studies use flawed methods that call their findings into question. Working with data from Oakland, California, we demonstrate the effectiveness of more credible methods for assessing racial profiling--looking at both the decision to stop motorists and at post-stop activities--and how naive comparisons that do not use such methods can either overstate or understate the magnitude of the problem
Improving the safety and security of freight and passenger rail in Pennsylvania : conducted pursuant to SR 2006-824 by David Ortiz( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report reviews Pennsylvania's statutory and regulatory authority over rail and identifies possible actions that Pennsylvania might take to improve rail safety and security, based on the physical rail system in Pennsylvania and its operating characteristics; a qualitative analysis of risk components; a review of recent studies and actions regarding rail security; and an overview of actions taken by other states. Though regulation of rail is largely a federal activity, there is significant flexibility within existing legal authority for Pennsylvania to play an active role in shaping its rail safety and security. Pennsylvania has a dense network of rail freight routes throughout the state, while its passenger rail services are concentrated in its southeastern corner. The terrorist threat to rail systems is well documented, and infrastructure will always be vulnerable. However, the extent and diversity of railroad infrastructure and operations in Pennsylvania requires an equally diverse approach to security. Effective response is also essential for minimizing casualties and economic damage resulting from rail incidents. Possible state-level actions to improve safety and security include the use of state rail development funding to improve rail freight infrastructure; provision of a range of support services depending on local needs; coordination of simulations and exercises with local, state, and federal agencies and the railroads; and building state-level capacity in railroad safety and security
Analysis of racial disparities in the New York City Police Department's stop, question, and frisk practices by Greg Ridgeway( Book )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Testing for racial profiling in traffic stops from behind a veil of darkness by Jeff Grogger( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The key problem in testing for racial profiling in traffic stops is estimating the risk set, or "benchmark," against which to compare the race distribution of stopped drivers. To date, the two most common approaches have been to use residential population or to conduct traffic surveys in which observers tally the race distribution of drivers at a certain location. It is widely recognized that residential population data provide poor estimates of the population at risk of a traffic stop; at the same time, traffic surveys have limitations and are more costly to carry out than the alternative that we propose herein. In this article we propose a test for racial profiling that does not require explicit, external estimates of the risk set. Rather, our approach makes use of what we call the "veil of darkness" hypothesis, which asserts that police are less likely to know the race of a motorist before making a stop after dark than they are during daylight. If we assume that racial differences in traffic patterns, driving behavior, and exposure to law enforcement do not vary between daylight and darkness, then we can test for racial profiling by comparing the race distribution of stops made during the evening hours and controlling for clock time while estimating daylight/darkness contrasts in the race distribution of stopped drivers. We provides conditions under which our estimates are robust to a substantial nonreporting problem present in our data and in many other studies of racial profiling. We propose an approach to assess the sensitivity of our results to departures from our maintained assumptions. Finally, we apply our method to data from Oakland, California, and find that in this example the data yield little evidence of racial profiling in traffic stops
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : RAND quarterly report, October 2008 by Terry J Fain( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In July 2008, the RAND Corporation staff conducted Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) assessments of five home-based service providers as part of its ongoing evaluation of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act activities through the Los Angeles County Probation Department. The objective of these assessments was to conduct a detailed review of the home-based-program services and materials in order to compare current practice with the literature on best practices in corrections. More specifically, these assessments determined whether the treatment interventions were consistent with the research literature on evidence-based practices and the principles of effective intervention. The assessment evaluated each provider's capacity (its capability to deliver evidence-based interventions and services for offenders) and content (substance). Capacity includes leadership and development, staff characteristics, and quality assurance. Content includes offender assessment and treatment. Using structured staff-member interviews and data gathered from representative case files and other relevant program materials, each of these five domains was scored and rated as highly effective (65-100 percent), effective (55-64 percent), needs improvement (46-54 percent), or ineffective (45 percent or less)
 
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Strategies for disrupting illegal firearms markets : a case study of Los Angeles
Covers
Cincinnati Police Department traffic stops : applying RAND's framework to analyze racial disparitiesStrategies for disrupting illegal firearms markets : a case study of Los AngelesAnalyses for the initial implementation of the inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment systemPolice-community relations in CincinnatiStrategies for improving officer recruitment in the San Diego Police DepartmentLos Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2007-2008 reportLos Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2008-2009 reportExecutive summary of analyses for the initial implementation of the inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system
Alternative Names
Greg Ridgeway statisticus

Ridgeway, Gregory Kirk 1973-

Languages
English (84)