WorldCat Identities

Amberg, Rob

Overview
Works: 35 works in 38 publications in 1 language and 633 library holdings
Genres: Pictorial works  Interviews  Biography  Exhibition catalogs  Oral histories 
Roles: Interviewer, Author, Performer
Classifications: F217.B6, 975.5
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Rob Amberg
The new road : I-26 and the footprints of progress in Appalachia by Rob Amberg( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Quartet : four North Carolina photographers : Rob Amberg, Caroline Vaughan, Elizabeth Matheson, John Rosenthal( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Madison County project documenting the sound( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The isolated mountain hollows of Madison County provide the perfect environment to foster the preservation of ancient unaccompanied ballads. Over the last 100 years, these ballads have attracted folklorists, filmmakers, and photographers to the county's remote communities. Filmmakers Martha King and Rob Roberts tell the story of the tradition through the voices of the current generation of singers as well as through the films, photographs and recordings of John Cohen, Rob Amberg and Harvey Wang. Madison County project examines how both outside interest and the power of community and family have worked together to continue this unique tradition"--Container
The living tradition : North Carolina potters speak( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glimpses of the rural Carolinas( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oral history interview with Renee and Ashley Lee, December 19, 1999 Interview K-0284, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Renee Lee( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Renee Lee (who is joined by her daughter, Ashley) is a member of the Whitestocking community. Lee's trailer was ravaged by flooding. Thompson and Lee spend much of this interview discussing Lee's background and family life -- her children, memories from childhood, and reflections on community life. Some of these recollections and descriptions appear as excerpts, but researchers interested in a more thorough coverage of these issues should look to the full text of the interview. At the end of the interview, Lee expresses her frustration with the government's sluggish and bureaucracy-laden relief effort, which seems needlessly complicated, especially in contrast to the Red Cross's efficient, simple relief program. Lee's response to the flooding seems typical of Whitestocking residents -- fierce loyalty to the area and confidence in the rebuilding effort coupled with despair at the extent of the damage and frustration with official relief programs
Oral history interview with Raymond, Eunice, Wayne, and Charles Russell English, December 8, 1999 interview K-0280, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Raymond English( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Raymond and Eunice English are an elderly Duplin County couple who weathered Hurricane Floyd. They are joined by their son, Wayne, and their nephew, Charles. Wayne and Charles do most of the talking in this lengthy interview, describing their experiences with the flooding and their frustrations with unregulated pollution from hog houses as well as with inadequate and disorganized relief. Like many flood victims, they are trying to rebuild their homes and lives with very little monetary help from the state and federal governments and are relying on volunteer and religious organizations for help. The English family pays particular attention to the effects of the flood on their community. They believe the aging farming community is in decline and worry that the flood may have grievously damaged its self-sufficiency; yet, by the end of the interview seem quite proud of the pervasive ethic of responsibility and cooperation. To give researchers an idea of the kind of material in the interview, I selectively marked excerpts where Raymond discusses the history of his community and/or his personal history. Researchers looking for local history should read the entire interview for some interesting recollections
Oral history interview with Mattie Bell, Earl, Artis and Thomas Cavenaugh and Betsy Easter, December 7, 1999 interview K-0282, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Mattie Bell Cavenaugh( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this interview, Earl and Mattie Bell Cavanaugh, who are joined by family and friends, remember their experiences with Hurricane Floyd. Multiple interviewees may have detracted from this interview's value, as their responses to Thompson's questions are sometimes disjointed and unspecific. But they do offer an on-the-ground perspective on the flood and its aftermath. Like many affected North Carolinians, they are frustrated with inadequate compensation and are facing the prospect of trying to rebuild without help from insurance or the government, a prospect which seems difficult for a pair of octogenarians. Earl also offers some thoughts on the general erosion of moral values, prompted by the ban on school prayer, sex education, and social security among other factors
Oral history interview with James W. (Jim) Connor, December 19, 1999 interview K-0818, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by James W Connor( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hog farmer Jim Connor lost his hogs in the flooding during Hurricane Floyd, but he managed to save five cows, a horse, three cats, and a fox. That devotion to animals is a major theme of this interview, one Connor frequently describes in connection with his environmentalism. He defends the environmental practices of hog farmers and attacks environmentalists who sue farmers without good reason, even as he welcomes stiff penalties on polluters. In addition to illustrating one farmer's approach to animal husbandry and the environment, this interview reveals many of the details of hog "growing," including the workings of the automated hog houses and waste disposal systems
Oral history interview with Thomas and Elberta Hudson, December 18, 1999 interview K-0283, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Thomas Hudson( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Hudsons, both dedicated Christians, saw the presence of God during and after Hurricane Floyd. They explain that God helped them escape the floodwaters and oversaw an astonishing flood of generosity in the storm's aftermath, but He also used the flood to teach painful lessons about materialism. Elberta believes firmly that God sent the flood expressly for these purposes; Thomas thinks human error caused the flooding. The Hudsons also detail their escape from rising floodwaters and some of the recovery efforts they witnessed and took part in. It might be useful to read this interview with Bert Pickett's, as the two interviews present different religious reactions to the hurricane. There are a number of potentially useful, but small, details that were not included in the excerpts but might be useful to researchers. These are primarily blow-by-blow accounts of incidents in the flood's aftermath
Oral history interview with Richard Lee Hoffman Jr., November 8, 2000 Interview K-0505, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Richard Lee Hoffman( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this interview, Richard Lee Hoffman Jr., a real estate broker in Mars Hill, NC, describes his response to the area's growth, ushered in by the construction of the I-26 corridor. Hoffman is ambivalent about change -- he longs for the undeveloped land he explored as a child, but is willing to sacrifice it in exchange for the economic development that he will likely benefit from and contribute to as a real estate broker. But economic growth seems uncertain, as housing values are rising but few people seem willing to buy. In Hoffman's account, Madison County seems trapped between the past and the future. Longtime residents mingle awkwardly with newcomers, pockets of undeveloped land hide between housing developments, and an expanding population challenges community bonds
Oral history interview with Larry and Betty Kelley, December 9, 1999 interview K-0511, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Larry Kelley( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although ostensibly about the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd, this interview presents a history lesson on the gradual extinction of independent farming in eastern North Carolina. Larry Kelley shares the details of a lifetime of farming and other rural work. He sees himself as among the last members of a generation of old-school farmers who were pushed out of agriculture by factory farms and new techniques. But although farmers are being forced to abandon their farms, especially as Floyd exacerbated their financial difficulty, Larry maintains his faith in the strength of his rural community. This is a lengthy interview, and it is sometimes difficult to glean useful information from it because of interruptions and sound interference. The interview's highlights are focused on the Kelleys' experiences. Researchers interested in Larry's father's experiences as a farmer can look to the first fifteen pages of the transcript. Both Larry and Betty Kelley participated in the interview, but Larry did virtually all of the talking
Oral history interview with Stan Hyatt, November 30, 2000 Interview K-0249, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Stan Hyatt( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although Stan Hyatt, the Department of Transportation's resident engineer on the I-26 project, has helped open Madison County to new residents and industry, he is worried about the effect of opening the area to change. Nostalgia and balance dominate this interview: Hyatt remembers growing up in idyllic rural Madison County, but while he misses the past, he sees the corridor construction as a painful but necessary cure for the county's economic ills. He hopes that the environmental damage I-26 brings will not alter too drastically the environment tourists will drive there to see. This interview, like many of Rob Amberg's interviews, is more of a conversation than a question-and-answer session. Later in the interview, however, Hyatt speaks at length about the I-26 project in Madison County. Researchers interested in this subject should look to this interview for essential background on the project as well as construction details
Oral history interview with J.D. Thomas and Lela Rigsby Thomas, November 14, 2000 interview K-0507, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by J. D Thomas( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

J. D Thomas and his wife, Lela Rigsby Thomas, grew up on Sprinkle Creek in upper Madison County, North Carolina, and made their lifelong home not far from where they spent their childhoods. In this interview, they discuss the many changes that have come to Madison County since the early 1900s, remembering unpaved roads and reading by oil lamp, iceboxes and wooden sidewalks. Farmers, laborers, and textile workers formed a closely-knit community that bonded over decorating graves at their cemetery, or building barns together. But growth and immigration, speeded by road improvements and new highways that cut through Madison County, have changed the Thomases' community. They share their perspectives on these changes in this interview: Lela reveals a strong emotional connection to the area and frustration over the extent of its change and the number of new arrivals, although she is optimistic for the future. J.D., a self-described "old-timer," is resigned to his area's transformation and happy for the opportunity he hopes it brings to young people. This interview offers a portrait of change in people and in the natural environment, and a look at how one community has weathered the pressures of modernization
Oral history interview with John Ledford, January 3, 2001 interview K-0251, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by John Ledford( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John Ledford, the sheriff of Madison County, NC, describes his job and the changing role of county sheriff in a growing area. His job requires an understanding of the personal dynamics of the county, and many of its residents expect personal service. But Madison County is growing, and its growth is changing Ledford's job. In this interview, he describes the growing conflict between new arrivals and longtime residents; the political aspects of his position; the effects of a new highway corridor that brings business, but also crime, to the area; and the increasing complexity of a job that was once local and personal. In doing so, Ledford reveals his drive to keep pace with change and his regret that Madison County cannot remain the wooded paradise of his youth. This interview offers a thoughtful look at the challenges small communities face, caught up in an increasingly connected nation
Oral history interview with Sam Parker, December 5, 2000 Interview K-0252, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Sam Parker( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This interview is more about a lack of industrialization in North Carolina than the state's development, but offers an interesting perspective on growth. Sam Parker, Madison County Probation/Parole Officer, praises rural life in the interview. Parker left a job at an insurance agency in the 1960s to settle in the hills of Madison County, where he lived for a while without electricity and grew his own food. In this interview, he discusses his decision to leave the comforts of suburbia and the appeal of living a somewhat ascetic lifestyle, where community connections take the place of Internet connections. Parker sees this lifestyle declining, but does not condemn development or mourn its passing
Oral history interview with Jerry Plemmons, November 10, 2000 Interview K-0506, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Jerry Plemmons( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the time of the interview, Jerry Lee Plemmons, a lifetime Madison County resident, worked for the French Broad Electric Membership Corporation, consulting on energy conservation and working toward community development. In this interview, he reflects on the influence of development, particularly highway construction, on Marshall, NC, a town known as "a mile long, street wide, sky high, and Hell deep" (14). Plemmons sees roads as both constructive and destructive forces -- they bring new money and new people to communities, but they also offer residents the chance to leave, invite environmental damage, and balloon property values, thus driving out longtime residents. Rural North Carolinians, then, must work not only to protect their economic and environmental stability, but also the stability of their community values
Oral history interview with Taylor Barnhill, November 29, 2000 : Interview K-0245, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Taylor Barnhill( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this rich interview, Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition member (his precise role is unclear) Taylor Barnhill describes his rural childhood and its impact on his adult life. He is an environmental activist who decries the deleterious effects of development on rural North Carolina communities and wilderness. Barnhill aims his frustrations at road building and roadpaving -- in particular those projects related to the I-26 corridor in Madison County, NC -- which he thinks open rural communities to a soulless world of consumption and interfere with natural evolution. He hopes to inspire communities to rally around conservation issues, not only for the sake of the state's air and water, but also to give community members a renewed sense of place
Oral history interview with Raymond Rapp, November 17, 2000 Interview K-0253. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Raymond Rapp( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this interview, Mars Hill mayor Raymond Rapp outlines his vision for planned development in Mars Hill and Madison County. He is seeking balance -- between the desire for a small-town feel and a big-town economy; between the need for routes in and out of the area and the need to preserve the environment; and between the insularity of a small community and the need to bring in new residents. Rapp is an optimistic and active manager who started small -- with the construction of a gazebo -- but aims to make Mars Hill the gateway to a thriving, but still naturally beautiful, area. The interview provides a valuable look at the way a community faces the prospect of growth as well as at efforts toward responsible expansion. By making Mars Hill attractive, Rapp hopes to lure new businesses and residents as well as to maintain an atmosphere that will encourage community solidarity and a small-town feel. The interview emphasizes how important extensive planning is in preserving towns against aggressive, wasteful, and ugly development
Oral history interview with Darhyl Boone, December 5, 2000 Interview K-0246, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Darhyl Boone( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this interview, Mars Hill town manager Darhyl Boone fondly remembers his childhood in Madison County, which was poor in finances but rich in community values. Boone worries that values -- such as charity, hard work, and face-to-face contact -- are being eroded by immigration and development and that the construction of the I-26 corridor will accelerate this change. The interview is not particularly diverse and reads more like a conversation than a series of questions and answers. Boone's concern with rural values is obvious, and he tries throughout the interview to describe the values that make Madison County unique. Both he and interviewer Rob Amberg agree that the area has a special quality, bred by its semi-remote location. And both agree the area is at risk as subdivisions start to pop up and the interstate corridor threatens to bring in waves of new people. Boone shares many memories about growing up in Madison County. A sample of these recollections is included here, most notably those concerning US 23 before its paving and rerouting, but researchers interested in more details on a rural childhood should look through the interview in its entirety
 
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The new road : I-26 and the footprints of progress in Appalachia
Alternative Names
Amberg, Robert

Languages
English (28)

Covers
Quartet : four North Carolina photographers : Rob Amberg, Caroline Vaughan, Elizabeth Matheson, John RosenthalThe living tradition : North Carolina potters speak