WorldCat Identities

Iguchi, M. Y. (Martin Y.)

Overview
Works: 17 works in 28 publications in 1 language and 195 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HV5825, 363.450973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by M. Y Iguchi
A review of recent advances in knowledge about methadone maintenance treatment by I. van Beusekom( Book )

8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report, which provides a knowledge base for the development of methadone maintenance treatment clinical guidelines in Switzerland, reviews the world-wide literature (except for Switzerland, which is the subject of a separate investigation) on such treatment and existing guidelines. Articles on methadone maintenance treatment and concurring treatment modalities are discussed in detail, as well as existing knowledge about specific populations, such as pregnant addicts and addicts with HIV or tuberculosis. Research on prognostic factors to patients' responses to treatment and perceptions of opiate dependent persons are also reviewed to ascertain their value to practitioners in managing methadone maintenance treatment and in assessing the best possible treatment. A final chapter describes other substitution treatments in comparison to methadone maintenance and synthesizes the information of the review into a structured information source for thinking about guideline development
Testimony on drug treatment alternatives to incarceration by M. Y Iguchi( Book )

4 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past several decades, lawmakers in the United States have responded to the drug epidemic with tougher laws and longer sentences in an attempt to deter drug use. The resulting increase in drug cases has seriously overloaded judicial dockets creating a need for reasoned alternatives. In 1992, the Drug Policy Research Center conducted a drug policy seminar game involving Florida public officials that anticipated this increase in cases as well as the need to provide drug abuse treatment within the criminal justice system. Players in that policy game focused, as we are doing today, on the need to provide criminal offenders with drug abuse treatment as an alternative to incarceration. This emphasis was consistent with our drug policy modeling work that indicated treatment may well be a more cost-effective way to spend additional funds intended to reduce cocaine use than other options, such as domestic enforcement, interdiction, or source country control
Assessing U.S. drug problems and policy : a synthesis of the evidence to date( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The RAND Drug Policy Research Center has published an Occasional Paper offering a concise, accessible, objective view of where the United States has been, now stands, and night go in the future in its long "war on drugs." The authors assess the success of drug policies to date and review possible reasons why they have not been more successful. They recommend management of the drug problem for the long term, use of different policy levers depending on the stage of the epidemic, and tolerance of cross-state policy variation
Prenatal cocaine exposure : scientific considerations and policy implications by Suzanne L Wenzel( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prenatal exposure to drugs, including cocaine, is a significant and preventable cause of developmental disability. Almost two decades after the nation first heard stories of "crack babies," new research has shown that children exposed to cocaine before birth are at risk of learning and behavioral problems. Such problems have broad implications for education, social welfare, and criminal justice in the United States. This report presents an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of cocaine on the developing brain and offers policy considerations for addressing the issues that arise from cocaine use by pregnant women. Most of the scientific research discussed in the report is derived from a 1997 New York Academy of Sciences conference on "Cocaine: Effects on the Developing Brain," the proceedings of which have been published as Volume 846 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Harvey and Kosofsky, 1998). The policy implications discussed here are based on material presented at this conference and on investigations conducted by researchers at RAND
Hardcore drug users claim to be occasional users : drug use frequency underreporting by Andrew R Morral( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Self-reports of drug use frequency are central to treatment outcome evaluations, estimates of the prevalence of heavy use, estimates of treatment need, and other questions with direct relevance to drug policies. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known about the validity of these self-reports. This study examines the accuracy of 701 frequency self-reports made by a sample of methadone maintenance clients. Self-report accuracy is evaluated by comparing rates of positive urinalyses found for each case with rates that would be expected had drug use occurred only as often as reported. Expected rates of positive urinalyses are derived from conservative Monte Carlo models of drug use for each case. This procedure reveals extensive heroin and cocaine use frequency underreporting. After adjusting for frequency underreporting, 51% of 279 cases reporting only occasional heroin use (1-10 days in the past 30), and 22% of the 157 cases reporting occasional cocaine use, are found to be using these drugs with frequencies corresponding to what the Office of National Drug Control Policy defines as "hardcore use" (more than 10 days in the past 30). Drug use frequency underreporting appears substantial, and might constitute an important threat to the validity of some treatment outcome evaluations, needs assessments and other analyses that rely on drug use frequency self-reports
How goes the "war on drugs"? : an assessment of U.S. drug problems and policy by Jonathan P Caulkins( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Annotation
Still kicking : : aging performance artists in NYC and LA Metro Areas : information on artists IV by Joan Jeffri( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Study about aging performing artists, whose diverse work includes acting, directing, choreography, and music performance
Scientific opportunities in Hispanic drug abuse research( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reinforcing operants other than abstinence in drug abuse treatment : an effective alternative for reducing drug use by M. Y Iguchi( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Natural classes of treatment response by Andrew R Morral( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Female streetwalkers' perspectives on migration and HIV/STI risks in a changing economic and social environment : a qualitative study in Shanghai, China by Z. Jennifer Huang( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sexual Acquisition and Transmission of HIV Cooperative Agreement Program (SATHCAP), 2006-2008 [United States] Restricted Use Files( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What is SAMHSA doing to help communities make good decisions about the allocation of scarce treatment resources? by M. Y Iguchi( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Communities need information to assess what treatment resources are in place, the cost of those resources, and how those resources are performing. This is a very complicated process as a single individual may utilize services from a variety of systems. For example, a single person may be enrolled in drug treatment, may be getting treatment for depression at a community mental health center, may be on Medicaid, and could be involved with a criminal justice diversion program. Each system contacted by that individual keeps its own records in its own separate database. To understand the coordinated cost of services utilized by a given individual requires a single database integrating information from multiple systems. Recently, in partnership with the states of Oklahoma, Washington, and Delaware, SAMHSA developed a database system capable of merging cost and utilization information from Medicaid, mental health, and substance abuse systems. This integrated database system represents an important step forward in that it overcomes significant technical obstacles and recognizes the multitude of agencies and resources that must be coordinated to evaluate service delivery
How goes the war on drugsʺ? : An assessment of U.S. drug problems and policy by Jonathan P Caulkins( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Drug courts : a conceptual framework( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Structural and process characteristics of drug courts may have a major influence on offender outcomes. However, despite the existence of dozens of outcome evaluations in the drug court literature, it is impossible to draw clear conclusions regarding variability in outcomes in relation to drug court characteristics. The authors describe existing approaches to the description of drug court structure and process and argue that a new approach is needed. To address that need, they propose a conceptual framework of five drug court dimensions: leverage, population severity, program intensity, predictability, and rehabilitation emphasis. These dimensions, each scorable on a range from low to high, lend themselves to a systematic set of hypotheses regarding the effects of structure and process on drug court outcomes. Finally, the authors propose quantitative and qualitative methods for identifying such effects
Facilitating treatment entry among out-of-treatment injection drug users( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

High-risk injection practices are common among injecting drug users (IDUs), even following intervention efforts. Moreover, relapse to risk behaviors has been reported among those who initiate risk reduction. Substance abuse treatment offers the potential to reduce or eliminate injecting risk behaviors through drug cessation. This study examines the effectiveness of two intervention strategies in facilitating treatment entry among out-of-treatment IDUs: motivational interviewing (MI), an intervention developed to help individuals resolve their ambivalence about behavior change, and free treatment for 90 days. These conditions were compared with an intervention focusing on a hierarchy of safer injecting practices, referred to here as risk reduction (RR), and no free treatment. Overall, 42% of study participants entered treatment. No significant differences were found between MI and RR; however, 52% of those assigned free treatment entered compared with 32% for those who had to pay
Correlates of HIV risk among female sex partners of injecting drug users in a high-seroprevalence area( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Risk factors for HIV infection were examined in 520 female sex partners (SPs) of injecting drug users (IDUs); 16% tested HIV positive (40% among former IDUs). In multivariate analyses, sex trade was associated with risk of HIV infection, whereas race, age, history of pneumonia or genital herpes, high self-rated AIDS risk, and IDU history were related to greater risk. Among women with no IDU history, cohabitation with a SP (not trading sex) predicted higher risk; having a female SP was also associated with higher risk. Secondary analyses suggest that total unprotected contacts with IDUs and both sex trade and cohabitation might account for these findings. The data suggest that, for female SPs of IDUs, reducing numbers of sex partners per se may not confer adequate protection from HIV. For women in committed relationships with IDUs, interventions should address contextual factors in relationships that elevate risk and complicate prevention
 
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How goes the "war on drugs"? : an assessment of U.S. drug problems and policy
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How goes the "war on drugs"? : an assessment of U.S. drug problems and policy
Alternative Names
Iguchi, Martin Y.

Languages
English (28)