WorldCat Identities

Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada)

Overview
Works: 240 works in 447 publications in 1 language and 2,923 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Observations 
Classifications: SH223, 333.95
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada) Publications about Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada)
Publications by Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada) Publications by Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada)
Most widely held works by Gulf Fisheries Centre (Canada)
Off bottom oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) culture in Prince Edward Island an evaluation of seed sources and stocking density by Luc A Comeau ( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An atlas of the January distribution of selected marine fish species in the Cabot Strait from 1994 to 1997 by G. A Chouinard ( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The geographic distribution of 25 marine fish species was examined using data collected during bottom trawl surveys conducted each January from 1994 to 1997. Over 90 species / species groups were captured during the four years of surveys. The geographic distribution of the 25 marine fish species that comprised 98% of the catches by weight is described. An analysis of diel differences in catchability was first conducted and correction factors were applied for 4 species. Standardized catches (in numbers and weights) were contoured using Delaunay triangulation. For seven commercial species, the distribution is described for fish smaller and larger than the minimum regulated size or size at maturity.--Includes text from document
Workshop on the lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery data collection pilot project and general data collection issued held in Moncton, New Brunswick, 16-17 February 2009 abstracts and proceedings by Workshop on the Lobster (Homarus Americanus) Fishery Data Collection ( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Temporal variation of stream and intragravel water temperatures in an Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) spawning area in Catamaran Brook (New Brunswick) by Daniel Caissie ( Book )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Acute and chronic toxicity of two formulations of the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethryn to an amphipod, sand shrimp and lobster larvae ( )
4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Pyrethroid insecticides are among the most toxic insecticides known, and among the pyrethroids, deltamethrin is often the most toxic to crustaceans in comparative tests. Two formulated deltamethrin products are in use in Atlantic Canada. The agricultural formulation is called Decis and the aquaculture formulation is called AlphaMax. The objectives of this study were to use marine crustaceans to measure acute toxicity of deltamethrin formulations in sea water using conventional 96-hr toxicity test methods, 1-hr pulse exposures and chronic and sublethal toxicity tests. The marine organisms chosen for this study were: Homarus americanus, the American lobster (a decapod crustacean); Crangon septemspinosa, the sand shrimp (a decapod crustacean); and Eohaustorius estuarius, a marine amphipod (an amphipod crustacean). These organisms are relevant to the study of pesticide toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations for the marine environment of Atlantic Canada.--Includes text from document
Coastal temperature monitoring program for 2003 and 2004 : Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence by Gilles Paulin ( Book )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A third-generation direct-entry system for gathering biological data from fish by Clarence Bourque ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Department of Fisheries and Oceans scientific staff at the Gulf Fisheries Centre, in Moncton, New Brunswick measure 80,000 to 120,000 herring and gather detailed biological data from 6,000 to 10,000 of these each year as part of the annual stock assessment and evaluation process. These fish come from samples of the commercial fishery, at-sea surveys and other research projects carried out each year. To enhance efficiency and accuracy an automated online computerized data entry, coding and verification system was developed. This system was updated to a more user-friendly graphic user interface based system compatible with 16-bit computer and networking technology. The enhanced multimedia capabilities and faster hardware found in modern computers as well as network compatibility issues and security constraints commonly in place on Local Area Networks made it necessary to update the software to be compatible with the 32-bit Windows XP platform. The updated software uses multimedia prompting and warning messages to improve efficiency, reduce errors and user fatigue. New graphic user interface based software was developed to replace outdated MSDOS based programs used to manipulate and initialize the electronic fish measuring board hardware component which are no longer fully supported under modern platforms. This document provides an overview of the system's different facilities including main data-gathering functions and utilities developed along with the main software
Increased oxygenation of sediment in Lamèque Bay (New Brunswick) following removal of algae and reduction of nutrient inputs from a seafood processing plant by François Plante ( Book )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report details the results of efforts to remove algae and nutrient inputs from Lamèque Bay, a shallow temperate bay located in northeastern New Brunswick. Analyses of redox and sulphides are provided as well as evidence identifying the causes of improved oxygenation of sediments between 2001 and 2007.--Includes text from document
Comparison of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) filtration rates at low temperatures ( )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were collected in the Gulf of St. Lawrence at the northernmost distribution area of C. virginica and maintained in cold water (0°C, 4°C or 9°C) over a 63-day period. Filtration rates were periodically determined in closed chambers initially inoculated with 10,000 phytoplankton cells mL⁻¹. For C. virginica, filtration at low temperatures was clearly an exception: the percentage of the experimental population clearing the phytoplankton cells from the closed chambers declined from peak values of 50% at 9°C to null values (no animals filtering) at 0°C. For M. edulis, the percentage ranged from 100% at 9°C to 17% at 0°C. With respect to absolute filtration rates, C. virginica cleared significantly fewer particles than did M. edulis. Moreover, unlike M. edulis, C. virginica showed no adaptation to cold during the 63-day experiment. Together these results suggest that C. virginica is disadvantaged in terms of grazing on seasonal phytoplankton blooms, including toxic (domoic acid) blooms, which have historically occurred at low temperatures (< 9°C) in eastern Canadian waters. We caution, however, that further experiments are required to ascertain how changes in food quality or availability may influence feeding behaviour of C. virginica at low temperatures
Preliminary index of essential habitats for certain marine species of importance in the eastern region of New Brunswick by J Therrien ( )
5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document presents a representative portrait of the information currently available on major marine resources in eastern New Brunswick in the form of data on 30 essential habitats of 31 marine species or groups of species. The descriptions are divided into three ecozones: Chaleur Bay, Shediac Valley, and the Northumberland Strait. The term "essential habitat" is used to characterize each species/habitat grouping representative of a vital habitat for a particular wildlife species. These areas are essential for various crucial stages in the species life cycle (such as spawning ground, feeding ground, or migration area) or they constitute a major area of concentration, particularly for mostly sedentary species such as mollusks. Fish concentration areas are generally not included, except for those associated with one particular life stage or a threatened species. The final section includes a brief analysis of the ecological and socio-economic characteristics of the habitats
The Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) for measuring marine environmental health in coastal waters of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence 2006 overview by J Weldon ( )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In 2003, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Gulf Region developed a monitoring program called the Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) to help determine the ecological health of estuaries and coastal shorelines in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (sGSL). The primary goal of CAMP continues to provide an outreach program for DFO to interact with community environmental groups. The monitoring aspect developed from this partnership was to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between the health of an estuary or coastal shoreline and the diversity and abundance of finfish and crustacean species which inhabit the littoral or near shore zone. CAMP expanded the number of locations from 4 in its 2003 pilot year (Theriault et al. 2006) to 24 throughout the Maritime Provinces of Nova Scotia (NS), New Brunswick (NB) and Prince Edward Island (PEI) in 2004. Baseline sites, meaning sites at which 6 stations were sampled by day-time beach seining once a month from May to September inclusive numbered 15 in 2004. In 2005, the number of locations totalled 22 of which 20 were considered as baseline (Weldon et al. 2007). In 2006, there were 22 locations participating and 18 were able to collect data for the five full months. Each community environmental group adhered to the same sampling methodology and related protocols as outlined in Weldon et al. (2005). All species of finfish, crabs and shrimp collected were identified, separated into young of the year and adults, enumerated and then released. Habitat was also characterized by collecting information such as water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, % plant cover and algae cover and, once a year in September, collection of a substrate sample for measurement of grain size distribution, % moisture content and % organic content. Two water samples were collected at each location and analysed for nutrient content. This report summarizes baseline physical and biological data for the estuaries sampled in 2006. This year slightly less than four hundred thousand animals were processed and 35 different species were identified. In order to test the hypothesis that these data reflect environmental quality, several years of data will be required to detect temporal and spatial patterns that may exist. Ultimately it is hoped that this program will prove to be a simple method of characterizing estuarine health that community groups will find both useful and easy to apply
Quality assurance : quality control (QA/QC) program for the community aquatic monitoring program (CAMP) by M.-H Theriault ( Book )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) program was carried out at six Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) sites in July-August 2007 to determine the accuracy and the precision of faunal identification and abundance estimates provided by environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs). ENGOs enumerated adults and young-of-the-year for each species, following CAMP protocols, but then retained the catch instead of releasing it live in order to be re-processed by Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) biologists. Three to five of the six stations normally sampled within each site were examined. Species richness and total abundance for each species, by station and site, were compared between DFO biologists and ENGOs.--Document
Abundance and function of rock crabs (Cancer irroratus) in longline mussel (Mytilus edulis) farms by Jean-François Mallet ( Book )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document reports on the relationship between crabs and suspended mussel (Mytilus edulis) culture in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Rock crabs (Cancer irroratus) were attracted to mussel leases when suspended socks (sleeves) touched the estuarine bottom. Crabs were shown to clean mussel socks of fouling organisms and debris. Ten crabs could reduce the weight of fouling and debris to about half the weight obtained in the absence of crabs. They also reduced the abundance of an invasive tunicate, Styela clava, which attached to mussel shells. This effect was detected at times when S. clava abundance on socks was relatively low. Rock crab abundances in the mussel leases declined from spring to fall, an observance that could be attributed to a seasonal migration or to the directed rock crab fishery. In one estuarine system the investigation focussed on the green crab, Carcinus maenas. As reported for the rock crab, the green crab had a significant cleansing effect, except with respect to an established invasive tunicate, Ciona intestinalis
Estimating the abundance and distribution of snow crab (Chionoecetes Opilio) off Cape Breton Island using video camera transects : a complementary technique to the bottom trawl survey ( Book )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A fishery for snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) has occurred on the east coast of Nova Scotia since the late 1970s. A biomass index was introduced for the 2000 fishing season based on three years of data collected by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans using a Nephrops trawl net. Because of uncertainties related to trawl behaviour on hard bottoms and the seasonal movements of snow crab in these areas, a simultaneous trawl, video, and trap study was initiated in 2003 in the Glace Bay Hole area of Sydney Bight to complement the trawl survey data. This experiment was not strictly designed to compare the video camera survey with the trawl survey, but rather to estimate the abundance and distribution of snow crab over both soft (trawlable) and hard (untrawlable) bottoms, and therefore complement the assessment conducted with the conventional Nephrops trawl survey. This report presents the methods and results of that experiment.--Includes text from document
Catches of downstream migrating fish in fast-flowing rivers using rotary screw traps by Gerald J Chaput ( Book )
4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The rotary screw trap provides a method of capturing fishes in fast flowing waters with minimal impact on the environment. A rotary screw trap is a passive sampling gear which takes advantage of flowing water to capture and retain downstream migrating fish. The gear is non-size and non-species selective. In sampling from five rivers in New Brunswick (Canada) during the spring and fall seasons, over 20 species of fishes were captured including Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), various species of small cyprinids (dace, chub, shiner), suckers (Catastomus sp.), American eel (Anguilla rostrata L.), and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus L.). The size of fish sampled in the traps ranged from emerging salmon fry at 3 cm fork length to adult American eels at over 85 cm in total length. Catches at the traps provided descriptions of downstream fish movements in the spring and fall, variations in species presence and relative abundance among years, within a river system and among rivers
The Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) for measuring marine environmental health in coastal waters of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence 2007 overview by J. W Weldon ( )
4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In 2003, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Gulf Region developed a monitoring program called the Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP) to help determine the ecological health of estuaries and coastal shorelines in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence (sGSL). The primary goal of CAMP continues to provide an outreach program for DFO to interact with community environmental groups. The monitoring aspect developed from this partnership was to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between the health of an estuary or coastal shoreline and the diversity and abundance of finfish and crustacean species which inhabit the littoral or near shore zone. This report summarizes baseline physical and biological data for the estuaries sampled in 2007.--Document
Pulp and paper mill effluents as a source of cytochrome P4501A1 inducers in fish of the Miramichi River, New Brunswick by Patricia L Melanson ( Book )
4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA in the livers of fish from the industrialized Miramichi River estuary suggesting exposure to certain organic contaminants. These studies implicated a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill (BKM) and a groundwood mill (GM) which discharge effluents into the upper estuary. In a series of three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that these effluents contain CYP1A1 inducers for fish in concentrations sufficient to explain the induction reported in wild fish. Immature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed for 133h to concentrations of secondary treated BKM effluent equal to or greater than 12% produced significant 2- to 10-fold CYP1A1 mRNA induction over controls. Primary treated GM effluent was lethal to trout at concentrations above 3% and no CYP1A1 mRNA induction was observed in the 3% exposed group. Mature Atlantic tomcod (Microgadus tomcod) were exposed to effluent dilutions under static conditions for 6-8 d. Pure BKME produced significant 6-fold hepatic CYP1A1 mRNA induction (sexes combined) but no significant response was observed to 1% BKME or 0.2% GME. Similarly, in a second exposure significant 6-fold induction was elicited in males by 10% BKME and also by 3% GME but not by lower concentrations of either effluent. However, in a third exposure no significant induction of either CYP1A1 mRNA or EROD enzyme activity (another measure of CYP1A1 induction) was observed in females exposed to doses of 0.01 - 10% BKME or 0.03 - 3% GME. Plasma concentrations of vitamins E (tocopherol) and A (didehydroretinyl palmitate (DP) and retinyl palmitate (RP)) were also measured as indicators of oxidative stress in the second exposure and showed significant depression of DP in tomcod exposed to 0.3% and 3% GME, but no significant response to BKME. Finally, Atlantic tomcod were caged for 10 d within the 1% effluent plumes of the two pulp and paper mills and at an unexposed reference site 5 km upstream. Significant CYP1A1 mRNA induction, relative to control fish held in the laboratory, was observed at the BKM (5.3-fold) and at the GM (7.4-fold) but also at the unexposed reference site (4.4-fold). Blood plasma concentrations of DP were significantly lower in tomcod caged at the GM and upriver reference sites, but not BKM site, than in the laboratory control group. However, neither RP nor tocopherol concentrations showed similar depression. We conclude that at the time of these experiments (1994-1995) effluents of the two Miramichi pulp mills contained CYP1A1 inducers for fish at least some of the time. However, the relatively small responses elicited by high effluent concentrations in laboratory exposures and the similar degrees of induction in fish caged within and beyond pulp mill effluent in the river suggest that the pulp mill effluents were not the sole or perhaps even the principal source of CYP1A1 inducers for fish in the Miramichi River
The predation of zooplankton by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the clubbed tunicate (Styela clava) ( Book )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study was undertaken in response to industry concerns that tunicates may filter mussel larvae resulting in low recruitment of spat. The objective was to determine if Styela clava as well as adult mussels significantly reduce the number of mussel larvae by filter feeding. Other zooplankton taxa were also examined to better understand the filtering capabilities of the two species and their potential to affect recruitment of near shore marine communities.--Document
Predicting snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) abundance using kriging with external drift with depth as a covariate by T Surette ( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Geostatistical analysis of snow crab trawl survey data have been used for estimating commercial snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) abundance indices and mapping its distribution in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence annually since 1988. A number of methods have been used to counteract sampling bias in the analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the performance of kriging with external drift with that of two previously used methods: ordinary kriging and ordinary kriging with inclusion of pseudo-zeroes in the analysis. This paper will also provide a detailed description of all analytical steps used in the estimation of southern Gulf snow crab abundance indices and resource distribution.--Includes text from document
 
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Alternative Names
Canada. Centre des pêches du Golfe
Canada. Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Gulf Region. Science Branch. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans. Gulf Region. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans. Gulf Region. Science Branch. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Gulf Fisheries Centre
Canada. Ministère des pêches et des océans. Centre des pêches du Golfe
Canada. Ministère des pêches et des océans. Région du golfe. Centre des pêches du Golfe
Canada. Ministère des pêches et des océans. Région du golfe. Direction des sciences. Centre des pêches du Golfe
Gulf Fisheries Center (Canada)
Languages
English (53)