WorldCat Identities

Nebeker, Delbert M.

Overview
Works: 41 works in 56 publications in 1 language and 52 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Delbert M Nebeker
Confidence in Human Nature and Leadership Style by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

4 editions published between 1972 and 1973 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Three studies are presented in support of a parsimonious interpretation of Fiedler's LPC scale which has been related consistently to leader effectiveness. Two of the studies found that undergraduate psychology students who scored higher on the LPC scale expressed a more optimistic view of human nature. A field study then found that park employees who scored higher on the LPC scale were more willing to endorse park policies permitting increased personal freedom for youngsters in parks. These findings supported an interpretation of LPC as a personality construct based upon confidence in human nature. (Author)
A model for supervisor behavior : an integration of Fielder's contingency model and expectancy theory by Delbert M Nebeker( )

3 editions published between 1972 and 1973 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of leadership style and situational favorability upon the perception of uncertainty and risk by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some recent research on Fiedler's contingency model has shown support for an interpretation of situational favorability as a perceived environmental uncertainty dimension. The interpretation has a number of advantages including the possibility that such an interpretation of situational favorability enables Fiedler's work to be a integrated with other contingency approaches currently receiving supportive attention. Seventy-one subjects were presented four paper and pencil simulations of leadership situations based on Fiedler's model. Estimates of perceived uncertainty and rish were derived from a number of scales presented to the subjects following each situation. (Modified author abstract)
Performance contingent reward system : a field study of effects of worker productivity by E. Chandler Shumate( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An incentive program designed to improve individual productivity was developed and implemented in the data entry section of a data processing center at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. The employees participating in the study were Navy civilian key entry operators. Production standards were developed based upon keying speed and the amount of time spent working. A Performance Contingent Reward System (PCRS) was designed in accordance with sound behavioral principles and federal guidelines such that a monetary bonus was awarded for high individual productivity. The amount of the reward was directly proportional to the amount of work exceeding a production standard. Production for the 12-month trial period improved substantially, both in keying speed and in the time spent working. Excessive overtime and a heretofore perpetual backlog were virtually eliminated. The work force decreased in size but not in productivity as a few employees left the organization through natural attrition and were not replaced. A rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the set-up costs of the program were recovered in the first 3 months of operation. The report describes work measurement and standards development; details of the PCRS, including performance-reward contingencies and the payment system; and suggestions for successful program implementation. (Author)
Keyprocessing performance : a method for determining operator performance standards by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this research and development was to develop a method for computing standards for the variety of tasks performed by key entry operators in both writing information and verification modes. Because of the difficulties associated with the traditional methods of setting standards, a new method was devised predicted on the influence of attributes or characteristics of source documents and procedures on keystroke rates of operators using the CMC keyprocessing system. When the characteristics associated with keystroke rates are known, standard keystroke rates can be set for these documents and procedures based on the weight of the different characteristics. Historical data on keystroke rate for over 160 different tasks were obtained from two shipyard key entry stations using the CMC system, and adjusted to reflect a normal or 'fair days' work pace to be used as the criterion in a multiple regression analysis of the task characteristics. For each task, over 40 different characteristics were analyzed to determine their effect on keystroke rate. The statistical analysis indicated that only six characteristics were required to set accurate standards for CMC system key punch operators: (1) the size of the document, (2) the color contrast of the document, (3) the maximum number of stokes per source document, (4) the maximum number of strokes per record, (5) the total number of punched fields per record, and (6) the number of records processed per year per operator
A Model of continuous organizational improvement : integrating gain sharing and total quality by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Continuous improvement requires an understanding of organizational processes and a focus on customer needs and desires. This report provides a model for continuous organizational improvement and shows how to integrate a reward system that motivates employees to make improvements. The model presented is a cycle of continual process improvement within an open systems framework. It focuses on the customer and then works backward from that point by showing how the organization can develop a strategic plan, improve processes, and measure performance. The model divides the organization into two subprocesses; management and production. The understanding of these two processes makes it possible to improve the quality of an organization's product or service, which in turn allows for increased productivity. Productivity Gain Sharing is the incentive system used to provide the vehicle for employee involvement as well as the energy to sustain improvements by offering performance awards
Examples of white collar measurement using a typology of organizational effectiveness by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Organizations interested in increasing their effectiveness need to establish valid and reliable performance measurement systems. This is especially true for those organizations that would like to implement a productivity Gain Sharing (PGS) system, because the success of PGS rests on the quality of the measurement system. This report describes the four major components of organizational effectiveness (Productivity, Financial Performance, Stakeholder Relations, and Resource Development) and demonstrates how effective performance indicators can be developed to establish a valid and reliable measurement system. Emphasis is placed on total organizational improvement and measures from all four components are shown to be desired for effective PGS systems
Approach to measurement of quality and productivity for gain sharing : measurement total organizational value by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Personality and Situational Effects on Leader Behavior by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published between 1974 and 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The paper examines a proposed relationship between leader behavior and two variables related to the contingency model. The variables of situational threat to the leader and the least preferred coworker (LPC) score interact in the predicted manner affecting the leader's orientation toward task and interpersonal situation, high LPC leaders are more interpersonally oriented while low LPC leaders are more task oriented. (Author)
Work standards, productivity, and quality by Charles Tatum( Book )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

W. Edwards Deming claims that standards should be eliminated because they focus on the quality of work produced to the detriment of work quality. The present study examined the effects of production standards on work quantity and quality. Thirty-seven employees were hired to perform a 'database management' task in a simulated work environment. The first week was the baseline period for productivity (keystrokes per our) and work quality (percent key entry errors). During the second week, the workers were divided into two control groups and four experimental groups. The control groups differed only in that one group received feedback on its productivity and the other group received no feedback. The four experimental groups represented four levels of work standards (80%, 90%, 110%, and 120% of baseline). The workers were divided into underachievers and overachievers. The underachivers showed a marked increase in keystrokes per hour as the standards increased. Key entry errors for underachievers and overachievers were unaffected by the standards, except that the overachievers made more errors than the underachievers for the moderately high (110%) standard. In general, there was no evidence that productivity increases were related to declines in work quality. Responses to job satisfaction and stress questions revealed no differences between any of the groups. Specific task strategies were identified that might explain how workers were able to increase production without sacrificing quality
Performance contingent rewards and productivity : a summary of a prototype incentive management system by Steven L Dockstader( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Productivity Improvement in a Purchase Division: Evaluation of a Performance Contingent Reward System (PCRS)( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Performance contingent reward systems (PCRSs) were developed for small purchase buyers and supply clerks in a purchase division of a naval shipyard supply department. The rewards were financial incentives provided to individual civil service employees performing above standard. Description of the system and an evaluation of its effectiveness in increasing productivity and saving costs are provided. Results showed that systems increased productivity substantially and were cost effective
A Typology of Organizational Effectiveness( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report provides a detailed look at how effective performance indicators can be developed to establish a valid and reliable measurement system. The four major components (Productivity, Financial Performance, Stakeholder Relations, and Resource Development) of organizational effectiveness are broken down into subcomponents. Aspects of performance management systems are then discussed in detail for each component and subcomponent. Measurement issues that may be useful for organizations that are contemplating the implementation of a Productivity Gain Sharing system are discussed. This discussion is particularly useful for those organizations that have a predominantly white-collar labor force
Predictions of Key Entry Performance Using the Reconceptualized Expectancy Model( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Research was conducted to replicate and to extend development of the reconceptualized expectancy model which predicts individual performance based on: (1) the individual's valence or value of outcomes; (2) the probability that these outcomes would be obtained through alternative performance levels; and (3) the individual's expectancy that he could perform at these alternative levels. The model was shown in an earlier work (AD-A030 451) to have substantial empirical validity. A questionnaire was individually administered to 30 data entry operators at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. The questionnaire which was designed to estimate the components of the reconceptualized expectancy model, provided for estimates of the expectancies that specific effort levels would result in specified performance alternatives. These estimates were used to construct predictions of individual performance. It was assumed that the best predictions of performance would be obtained by using the expectancy that the performance levels would be reached at maximum effort. The results of an earlier study were replicated almost in their entirety; however, problems were found with the model. The implications of the replication and the significance of the problems encountered with the reconceptualized model are discussed
Work Performance: A New Approach to Expectancy Theory Predictions( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Research was conducted to develop and test a model of performance based upon a reconceptualization of Vroom's (1964) expectancy model. The reconceptualized model assumes that an individual chooses from among levels of performance rather than, as proposed by Vroom, from among levels of effort to exert. A questionnaire was administered to each of 56 individuals employed as proof machine operators in one department of a large bank operation. The questionnaire was designed to estimate components of the new model such as the probability that the individual will be able to work at particular performance levels, the value of specific work outcomes, and the probability that performance at each of the performance levels will lead to the various work outcomes. These estimates were used to generate the model's prediction of the individual's observed performance as measured by the proportion of time that the individual actually performed at a given level
Leader Behavior: An Expectancy Theory Approach by Delbert M Nebeker( Book )

2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Expectancy theory has found increasing use in the study of such variables as worker efforts, performance and satisfaction. The paper suggests some mathematical modifications of expectancy theory which extend its use to the prediction of leader behavior. Data from a field study of naval aviation maintenance crews and a field study of public works maintenance shop supervisors, found that a leader's actual behavior could be predicted from the theory. These results suggest that expectancy theory not only has the ability to account for leader behavior in a real life setting but also helps us to understand the antecedents of such behavior. (Author)
Performance Contingent Rewards and Productivity: A Summary of a Prototype Incentive Management System( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Due to the high cost of human resources, the need to substantially reduce personnel costs without undermining the long-range quality and effectiveness of the work force continues to be a major Navy-wide concern. In an attempt to address this problem, a Performance Contingent Reward System (PCRS), an incentive management system that uses economic incentives to increase productivity, was tested on data entry processors at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard (LBNS) during 1977. The PCRS was designed according to theoretical axioms derived from an expectancy theory of work motivation. A system of work measurement and performance standards was developed, and a computer software package was redesigned to provide the data base for evaluating work performance and determining monetary rewards. Minor changes were made in the physical layout and work methods of the data entry operators and in some supervisory practices, and the task of coordinating the incentive program was assigned to the second level supervisor. Keystroke rate, the basic measure of productivity, has increased by 25 percent when compared with a preimplementation baseline. The chronic overtime condition has been eliminated and individual productive time has increased to 110 percent of expected. This combination of speed and efficiency has allowed for a 22 percent reduction in personnel (through normal attrition), resulting in significant cost savings to the organization
The Effects of Feedback and an Implied Standard on Work Performance by Steven L Dockstader( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Locke (1968) hypothesized that individuals will spontaneously set performance goals when their feedback is related to a standard of performance. This proposal was tested in an actual work setting by comparing the performance rate of keystroke operators who received feedback and a standard with that of a control group who received feedback alone. Performance comparisons over a 3-month period provided strong statistical support for the hypothesis. The outcome is discussed in terms of goal theory and the use of work standards to improve productivity. (Author)
An Approach to Measurement of Quality and Productivity for Gain Sharing: Measuring Total Organizational Value( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

When measuring organizational effectiveness, the focus should he on the value of what the organization does. The approach described in this report integrates measures of productivity, quality, and other less tangible dimensions of performance into a formula that produces an index of 'total value.' This index can then he used to assess improvements and make Productivity Gain Sharing payouts
Peer and Supervisory Ratings of Research Scientists( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A sample of 103 government research scientists was used to compare two performance evaluation systems currently used in a Federal agency for its research personnel. The two systems, supervisory ratings and peer ratings, were compared in terms of their respective reliability and validity. The results showed the peer ratings to be more stable over time and to relate more highly to scientific 'productivity' than do the supervisory ratings. Also, productivity was found to be significantly related to occupational levels resulting from peer evaluations. A discussion of these results and possible explanations for the differences between the two evaluation processes are given along with other considerations for organizations that contemplate alternate evaluation processes similar to peer ratings. (Author)
 
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English (33)