WorldCat Identities

Tong, Hui

Overview
Works: 24 works in 148 publications in 1 language and 804 library holdings
Classifications: HB1, 338.542
Publication Timeline
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Publications about  Hui Tong Publications about Hui Tong
Publications by  Hui Tong Publications by Hui Tong
Most widely held works by Hui Tong
Real effects of the subprime mortgage crisis is it a demand or finance shock? by Hui Tong ( )
15 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We develop a methodology to study how the subprime crisis spills over to the real economy. Does it manifest itself primarily through reducing consumer demand or through tightening liquidity constraint on non-financial firms? Since most non-financial firms have much larger cash holding than before, they appear unlikely to face significant liquidity constraint. We propose a methodology to estimate these two channels of spillovers. We first propose an index of a firm's sensitivity to consumer demand, based on its response to the 9/11 shock in 2001. We then construct a separate firm-level index on financial constraint based on Whited and Wu (2006). We find that both channels are at work, but a tightened liquidity squeeze is economically more important than a reduced consumer spending in explaining cross firm differences in stock price declines
Liquidity, institutional quality and the composition of international equity flows by Itay Goldstein ( )
14 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
FDI investors control the management of the firms, whereas FPI investors delegate decisions to managers. Therefore, direct investors are more informed than portfolio investors about the prospects of projects. This information enables them to manage their projects more efficiently. However, if investors need to sell their investments before maturity because of liquidity shocks, the liquidation price they can get will be lower when buyers know that they have more information on investment projects. In this paper we examine the choice between Foreign Direct Investment and Foreign Portfolio Investment at the level of the source country. Based on the Goldstein and Razin model, we predict that (1) source countries with higher expectation of future liquidity problems export relatively more FPI than FDI, and (2) this effect strengthens as the source country's capital market transparency worsens. To test these hypotheses, we examine the variation of FPI relative to FDI for source countries from 1985 to 2004. Our key variable is the predicted severity of liquidity shock, as proxied by episodes of economy-wide sales of external assets. Consistent with our theory, we find that the predicted liquidity shock has a strong effect on the composition of foreign equity investment. Furthermore, greater capital market opacity in the source country strengthens the effect of the liquidity shock
The impact of China on the exports of other Asian countries by Barry J Eichengreen ( Book )
8 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"We analyze the impact of China's growth on the exports of other Asian countries. Our innovation is to distinguish the increase in China's demand for imports from its increased penetration of export markets. Using the gravity model, we disaggregate among commodity types and account for the endogeneity of Chinese exports. We confirm the tendency for China's exports to crowd out the exports of other Asian countries. But this effect is felt mainly in markets for consumer goods and hence by less-developed Asian countries, not in markets for capital goods or by the more advanced Asian economies for which machinery and equipment are a significant fraction of exports. At the same time, there has been a strong tendency for a rapidly growing China to suck in imports from its Asian neighbors. But this effect is mainly felt in markets for capital goods, where China's income elasticity of import demand is highest, and thus by the more advanced Asian economies. Hence, more and less developed Asian countries are being affected very differently by China's rise"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Institutional weakness and stock price volatility by Galina Hale ( )
14 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Abstract: We find an empirical regularity that stronger creditor protection reduces the volatility of stock market prices. We analyze two distinct mechanisms that characterize equity price volatility: government guarantees and creditor protection. Using a Tobin q model, we demonstrate that weak creditor protection that gives rise to government guarantees and tightens credit constraints, increases stock price volatility. Empirically, accounting for the probability of financial crises, we find that government guarantees and weak institutions that tighten credit constraints increase aggregated stock price volatility
Bilateral FDI flows : threshold barriers and productivity shocks by Assaf Razin ( Book )
8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"A positive productivity shock in the host country tends typically to increase the volume of the desired FDI flows to the host country, through the standard marginal profitability effect. But, at the same time, such a shock may lower the likelihood of making any new FDI flows by the source country, through a total profitability effect, derived from the a general-equilibrium increase in domestic input prices. This is the gist of the theory that we develop in the paper. For a sample of 62 OECD and Non-OECD countries over the period 1987-2000, we provide supporting evidence for the existence of such conflicting effects of productivity change on bilateral FDI flows. We also uncover sizeable threshold barriers in our data set and link the analysis to the Lucas Paradox"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Credit constraints and stock price volatility by Galina Hale ( )
13 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper addresses how creditor protection affects the volatility of stock market prices. Credit protection reduces the probability of oscillations between binding and non-binding states of the credit constraint; thereby lowering the rate of return variance. We test this prediction of a Tobin's q model, by using cross-country panel regression on stock price volatility in 40 countries over the period from 1984 to 2004. Estimated probabilities of a liquidity crisis are used as a proxy for the probability that credit constraints are binding. We find support for the hypothesis that institutions that help reduce the probability of oscillations between binding and non-binding states of the credit constraint also reduce asset price volatility
The impact of credit protection on stock prices in the presence of credit crunches by Galina Hale ( )
15 editions published between 2009 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Data show that better creditor protection is correlated across countries with lower average stock market volatility. Moreover, countries with better creditor protection seem to have suffered lower decline in their stock market indexes during the current financial crisis. To explain this regularity, we use a Tobin q model of investment and show that stronger creditor protection increases the expected level and lowers the variance of stock prices in the presence of credit crunches. There are two main channels through which creditor protection enhances the performance of the stock market: (1) The credit-constrained stock price increases with better protection of creditors; (2) The probability of a credit crunch leading to a binding credit constraint falls with strong protection of creditors. These mechanisms are consistent with the patterns observed in the cross-country data. We find that except for OECD countries with low creditor protection, stock market return is negative in the crisis years and positive in non-crisis years
Is China's FDI coming at the expense of other countries? by Barry J Eichengreen ( )
8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"We analyze how China's emergence as a destination for foreign direct investment is affecting the ability of other countries to attract FDI. We do so using an approach that accounts for the endogeneity of China's FDI. The impact turns out to vary by region. China's rapid growth and attractions as a destination for FDI also encourages FDI flows to other Asian countries, as if producers in these economies belong to a common supply chain. There is also evidence of FDI diversion from OECD recipients. We interpret this in terms of FDI motivated by the desire to produce close to the market where the final sale takes place. For whatever reason -- limits on their ability to raise finance for investment in multiple markets or limits on their ability to control operations in diverse locations -- firms more inclined to invest in China for this reason are corresponding less inclined to invest in the OECD. A detailed analysis of Japanese foreign direct investment outflows disaggregated by sector further supports these conclusions"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Does trade globalization induce or inhibit corporate transparency? unbundling the growth potential and product market competition channels by Hui Tong ( )
13 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
How does increasing globalization affect corporate transparency? Freer trade represents different facets and in theory has ambiguous effects on corporate transparency. On the one hand, by exposing firms to more product market competition, it could discourage discretionary disclosure. On the other hand, by opening up foreign markets and enhancing firms' growth opportunities, it may promote more transparency. Rather than simply estimating a net effect, this paper pursues an approach that allows separate estimation of the two potentially opposing channels. We employ three different measures of corporate transparency and track their evolutions for 4061 firms in 49 countries during 1992-2005. By using detailed product-level tariff schedules for these countries, we construct a measure of growth opportunities enabled by foreign tariff liberalizations at the sector-country-year level, and a second measure of globalization-induced product market competition based on a country's own tariff liberalization (again at the sector--country-year level). We find strong evidence that higher growth opportunities engendered by globalization promotes corporate transparency, especially in industries that depend heavily on external financing. At the same time, we find somewhat weaker evidence that greater product market competition engendered by globalization discourages corporate transparency. The results demonstrate the importance of disentangling the multiple and potentially conflicting effects of globalization
Creditor protection, contagion, and stock market price volatility by Galina Hale ( Book )
6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The misfortune of non-financial firms in a financial crisis : disentangling finance and demand shocks by Hui Tong ( Book )
6 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Creditor protection and stock price volatility by Galina Hale ( Book )
6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The impact of creditor protection on stock prices in the presence of liquidity crises theory and cross-country evidence by Galina Hale ( Book )
4 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We develop a model predicting two channels through which creditor protection enhances the performance of stock prices: (1) The probability of a liquidity crisis leading to a binding investment-finance constraint falls with a strong protection of creditors; (1) The stock prices under the investment-constrained regime increase with better protection of creditors. We find empirical support for both predictions using data on stock market performance, amount and cost of credit, and creditor rights protection for 52 countries over the period 1980-2008. In particular, we find that better creditor protection is correlated across countries with lower average stock market volatility, crises are more frequent in countries with poor creditor protection. Using propensity score matching we also show that during crises stock market returns and investment fall by more in countries with poor creditor protection
The composition matters capital inflows and liquidity crunch during a global economic crisis by Hui Tong ( )
3 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
International capital flows, while potentially beneficial, are said to increase a countrys vulnerability to crisis - especially if they are skewed to non-FDI types. This paper studies whether the volume and composition of capital flows affect the degree of credit crunch faced by a country's manufacturing firms during the 2007-09 crisis. Using data on 3823 firms in 24 emerging countries, we find that, on average, the decline in stock prices was more severe for firms that are intrinsically more dependent on external finance for working capital. The volume of capital flows per se has no significant effect on the severity of the credit crunch. However, the composition of capital flows matters a great deal: pre-crisis exposure to non-FDI capital inflows worsens the credit crunch, while exposure to FDI alleviates the liquidity constraint. Similar results also hold when we perform an event study surrounding the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy
U.S. Monetary Shocks and Global Stock Prices by Luc Laeven ( Book )
3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper studies how U.S. monetary policy affects global stock prices. We find that global stock prices respond strongly to changes in U.S. interest rate policy, with stock prices increasing (decreasing) following unexpected monetary loosening (tightening). This impact is more pronounced for sectors that depend on external financing, and for countries that are more integrated with the global financial market. These findings suggest that financial frictions play an important role in the transmission of monetary policy, and that U.S. monetary policy influences global capital allocation
The external impact of China's exchange rate policy evidence from firm level data by Barry J Eichengreen ( Book )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We examine the impact of renminbi revaluation on firm valuations, considering two surprise announcements of changes in China's exchange rate policy in 2005 and 2010 and data on 6,050 firms in 44 countries. Renminbi appreciation has a positive effect on firms exporting to China but little positive or even a negative impact on those providing inputs for China's processing exports. Stock prices rise for firms competing with China in their home market while falling for firms importing Chinese products with large imported-input content. Renminbi appreciation also reduces the valuation of financially-constrained firms, particularly in more financially integrated countries -- National Bureau of Economic Research web site
The Chinese corporate savings puzzle a firm-level cross-country perspective by Tamim A Bayoumi ( )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
China's high corporate savings rate is commonly claimed to be a key driver for the country's large current account surplus. The mainstream explanation for high corporate savings is a combination of windfall profits in state-owned firms, especially in resource sectors, and mis-governance of state-owned firms represented by their low dividend payout. The paper casts doubt on these views by comparing the savings of 1557 Chinese listed firms with those of 29330 listed firms from 51 other countries over 2002 to 2007. First, Chinese firms do not have a significantly higher savings rate (as a share of total assets) than the global average because corporations in most countries have a high savings rate. The rising corporate savings rate is also consistent with a global trend. Second, there is no significant difference in the savings behavior and dividend patterns between Chinese majority state-owned and private listed firms, contrary to the received wisdom -- National Bureau of Economic Research web site
From the financial crisis to the real economy using firm-level data to identify transmission channels by Stijn Claessens ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Using accounting data for 7722 non-financial firms in 42 countries, we examine how the 2007-2009 crisis affected firm performance and how various linkages propagated shocks across borders. We isolate and compare effects from changes in external financing conditions, domestic demand, and international trade on firms' profits, sales and investment using both sectoral benchmarks and firm-specific sensitivities estimated prior to the crisis. We find that the crisis had a bigger negative impact on firms with greater sensitivity to demand and trade, particularly in countries more open to trade. Interestingly, financial openness appears to have made limited difference -- National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Policies for macrofinancial stability : how to deal with credit booms ( )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The impact of creditor protection on stock prices in the presence of credit crunches ( Book )
2 editions published between 2009 and 2011 in Undetermined and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names
Hui, Tong
Tong, Hui, 2003 fl.
佟晖
佟辉
Languages
English (142)