WorldCat Identities

Mississippi State University Department of Plant and Soil Sciences

Overview
Works: 35 works in 36 publications in 1 language and 41 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Periodicals 
Classifications: S79,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mississippi State University
Fruit & nut recommendations for Mississippi by Freddie Rasberry( Book )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2015 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Urea-ammonium nitrate fertilizer placement effects on corn (<i>Zea mays</i> L.) N utilization and grain yield as influenced by irrigation( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and nitrogen (N) management practices have been an increasing concern among corn (<i>Zea mays</I> L.) producers. The objective of this study was to assess the placement distance of UAN and measure total N uptake on corn grain yield as affected by irrigation. Field trials were conducted in 2011 and 2012 at the Plant Science Research Center, Mississippi State, MS. Placement distance and irrigation influenced both total N uptake and grain yield results during both years of this study. Total N uptake and corn grain yield results were derived from plant samples and harvest data. Overall results from this study indicate increasing placement distance from the center of the planted row resulted in a decrease in total N uptake and grain yield. Results also show the subsurface banded treatment resulted in a greater N uptake and grain yield.</p>
Quantifying a daily light integral for warm-season putting green species by Benton Prichard Hodges( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A major constraint for ultradwarf bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. x C. transvaalensis) putting green cultivars is poor performance under reduced light environments (RLEs) due to the overall poor shade tolerance of bermudagrass. The objectives of this research were to quantify a daily light integral (DLI) requirement for warm-season putting green cultivar establishment, quantify a DLI requirement for established warm-season putting green cultivars, and identify differences in plant responses of warm-season putting green cultivars under RLEs during establishment and for established turf stands, as well. Using regression analysis, DLI requirements were generated to quantify the amount of light needed to reach 70% cover during warm-season putting green cultivar establishment, and to quantify the amount of light needed to maintain commercially acceptable turf quality for established warm-season putting green cultivars. Other plant responses were measured under various light regimes for each study
Evaluation of water and nitrogen management practices in southern US rice (<i>Oryza sativa</i> L.) production( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>Nitrogen (N) fertility and irrigation costs are the greatest input expenses required for rice production in Mississippi, therefore N management and irrigation should be conducted in efficiently. Field experiments were conducted at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, MS, and the LSU AgCenter in Crowley, LA, to evaluate water and nitrogen management practices. Nitrogen use efficiency and yield were not different for alternate wetting and drying (AWD) systems compared to a traditional continuous flood. Additionally, experiments were conducted to test for differences comparing two experimental designs, randomized complete block (RCB) and split-plot (SP), for N-rate response trials in Mississippi. Rice grain yield response to N-rate was similar for RCB and SP designs, therefore either experimental design would be appropriate for N-response experiments in rice. Increasing efficiency of water and N management practices further improves environmental and economic benefits from rice production in Mississippi.</p>
Evaluation of herbicide formulation and spray nozzle selection on physical spray drift by Jasper Lewis Cobb( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

New transgenic crops are currently being developed which will be tolerant to dicamba and 2, 4-D herbicides. This technology could greatly benefit producers who are impacted by weed species that have developed resistance to other herbicides, like glyphosate-resistant Palmer Amaranth. Adoption of this new technology is likely to be rapid and widespread which will lead to an increase in the amount of dicamba and 2,4-D applied each season. It is well-documented that these herbicides are very injurious to soybeans, cotton, tomatoes, and most other broadleaf crops, and their increased use brings along increased chances of physical spray drift onto susceptible crops. Because of these risks, research is being conducted on new herbicide formulation/spray nozzle combinations to determine management options which may minimize physical spray drift
Evaluation of rapidly growing vegetation on Mississippi roadsides by Timothy Bradford( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Non-point source pollution caused by erosion from road construction poses hazardous environmental effects. Percolation and infiltration of nutrients into groundwater can also be detrimental to the surrounding environment. In addition, annual roadside maintenance budget exceeded $14 dollars in 2011 for Mississippi. Objectives of this research were to evaluate rapidly established short-statured species in an effort to prevent erosion, combat non-point source pollution, reduce mowing cost, and provide quick cover following propagation. Factors evaluated were rate of establishment, plant cover, and mowing requirement. MDOT's standard seed mix was evaluated along with Pennington's SlopeMaster (T̳M̳) product and different combinations of selected plant species. Visual and image analysis showed oilseed radish plants established the quickest and provided the most cover. All sod treatments provided instant cover while Pennington's Slopemaster (T̳M̳) product, as well as mixes that contained bermudagrass or bahiagrass, provided sufficient cover, but not in a timely manner
Management of glyphosate resistant Palmer amaranth in Bollgard II® XtendFlex™ cotton by Daniel Zachary Reynolds( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Experiments were conducted to evaluate efficacy of dicamba, glufosinate, and glyphosate on Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.). Residual control was evaluated after dicamba was applied alone and in combination with fomesafen, fluometuron, acetochlor, and prometryn. Postemergence efficacy of dicamba, glufosinate, and glyphosate on different size Palmer amaranth was also evaluated. In addition, combinations of dicamba, glufosinate, and glyphosate were evaluated for efficacy on Palmer amaranth as well as spray coverage and spray droplet size as affected by various spray nozzles. Lastly, tolerance to dicamba, glufosinate, and glyphosate of cotton cultivars containing Bollgard II® XtendFlex™ technology was examined. Dicamba exhibited preemergence activity on Palmer amaranth; however, activity was heavily dependent on rainfall. Postemergence applications of dicamba increased control of Palmer amaranth. Spray nozzle selection influenced spray coverage and droplet size. Tolerance of cultivars containing Bollgard II® XtendFlex™ technology was over 90% at the end of the year regardless of herbicide
Postemergence and residual control of glyphosate-resistant palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) with dicamba by Clifford Blake Edwards( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

On-farm research was conducted in 2011 and 2012 to determine the postemergence and residual control by dicamba of glyphosate-resistant (GR) Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.). Preemergence dicamba at 0, 0.28, 0.56, and 1.1 kg ae ha⁻¹ and 0.07 kg ae ha⁻¹ flumioxazin was applied at 30, 15 and 0 days prior to planting. Postemergence dicamba at 0.28, 0.56, and 1.1 kg ae ha⁻¹ with and without 0.84 kg ae ha⁻¹ glyphosate was applied to 5, 10 and 15 cm Palmer amaranth. In addition, a greenhouse experiment was conducted in 2012 to evaluate and confirm the optimum rate for control of Palmer amaranth with a new formulation of dicamba (BAS 18322H). In the greenhouse, dicamba at 0.14, 0.28, 0.56, 1.1, and 2.2 kg ae ha⁻¹ was applied to 5, 10, and 15 cm Palmer amaranth
Improved production practices in a double-cropping system with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) by Tyler Dixon( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

With the recent rise of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) prices and the spike in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) prices in 2011, a renewed interest in double-cropping cotton following wheat production occurred. Research was established to improve production practices of double-cropped cotton at three Mississippi locations, Starkville (2012-2013), Brooksville (2012-2013), and Stoneville (2013). Cotton following wheat has the potential to result in a higher return compared to soybeans; however, the financial risk associated with cotton is far greater than with soybeans. Growers should increase seeding rates by 20% when double-cropping cotton following wheat and burn the wheat stubble to maximize yield. No definitive N rate was observed to maximize yield; however, a normal rate full-season cotton is not recommended as high N rates delayed maturity and increased the potential yield loss
Vegetable press( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

S-metolachlor phytotoxicity in sweetpotato by Issah Alidu Abukari( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

S-metolachlor is an effective herbicide used to control/suppress annual grasses, nutsedges and several broadleaf weeds in sweet potato. However, a decline in storage root quality and yield has been reported under certain environmental conditions. Information is limited on the effect of S-metolachlor application followed immediately by rainfall on sweet potato growth and development under different temperatures, as well as the optimum application time. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate sweet potato responses to interactive effects of S-metolachlor, temperature and rainfall, and to determine S-metolachlor optimum application time. A sunlit, controlled environment experiment was conducted to investigate sweet potato response to S-metolachlor and rainfall immediately after application under different temperatures. Sweet potato slips were transplanted into sandy soil filled pots. Treatment combinations included five levels of S-metolachlor, 0.00, 0.86, 1.72, 2.58 and 3.44 kg ha-1, two levels of rainfall, 0 and 38 mm and three temperatures, 25/17, 30/22 and 35/27 °C, day/night. After POST application of S-metolachlor and rainfall, all plants were transferred to sunlit growth chambers that were maintained at their respective temperatures and ambient CO2 concentration for 60 days. In another experiment, S-metolachlor application time was varied to investigate sweet potato growth and development. Two levels of S-metolachlor 0.0 and 1.0 kg ha-1 and three application times 0, 5 and 10 days after transplanting (DAT) were used and plants were harvested five times, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 80 DAT to estimate plant growth and development. Shoot, root and total plant biomass yields declined with increasing concentration of S-metolachlor across temperatures. In addition, storage root yield and quality decline was S-metolachlor rate dependent and aggravated by rainfall immediately after herbicide treatment across temperatures. S-metolachlor was more injurious on most plant component parameters in the optimum and high temperatures where plant growth was vigorous than in the low temperatures. S-metolachlor application at 0 and 5 days affected sweet potato growth, including storage roots, but delaying until 10 days minimized the injury. These results can be used to weigh the risk of crop injury against the weed control benefits of S-metolachlor when making management decisions, and to determine application time based on weather information
Foundation plantings by Henry J Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Evaluation of saflufenacil use in southern U.S. rice production by Garret Brown Montgomery( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Research was conducted in 2012 and 2013 to evaluate the use of saflufenacil in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Studies included a preemergence evaluation of different rates of saflufenacil in comparison to one rate of carfentrazone, a postemergence evaluation of saflufenacil at different rates and carfentrazone at one rate at different postemergence timings, an adjuvant evaluation to assess rice injury and weed control from different adjuvants when mixed with saflufenacil, a Clearfield program evaluation where saflufenacil was compared to other broadleaf herbicides in a Clearfield weed control program, and a cultivar tolerance evaluation where postemergence applications of saflufenacil were compared to carfentrazone on five different commercial rice cultivars
Evaluation of producing sand-based sod on a fine-textured native soil using transported sand by John David Vanderford( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Turfgrass establishment on sand-based rootzones is routinely accomplished by using sod produced on a fine-textured native soil. As a result, soil layering occurs, potentially causing initial reduction in water infiltration, rooting, aeration, and overall turfgrass quality. This research was aimed at determining the feasibility of applying sand over existing native soil to produce hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers. x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy) sand-based sod. Factors evaluated were visual quality and scalping. Treatments were harvested and transplanted to a sand-based research green where handle-ability, tensile strength, and infiltration were also evaluated. Results indicate aerify and topdress treatments showed higher quality pre-harvest. Control and 25 mm treatments were best in terms of harvesting, handle-ability, and sod tensile strength. Infiltration data indicated no significant differences between treatments. These outcomes along with further analysis could provide sod producers with a valuable product for use on sand-based rootzones
Propagation of blueberries in compost amended media( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>The objective of this study was to determine the effects of propagation media containing composted material on the rooting of hardwood and softwood blueberry cuttings. The physical properties were measured at the end of the experiment. The media used were pine bark fines, composted pine bark with ammoniated nitrogen added, hardwood bark and composted chicken manure, pine bark and cotton gin waste, and control (peat moss and perlite, 1:1). All treatments resulted in a low number of rooted hardwood cuttings compared to the control. The total number of roots per cutting and alive cuttings hardwood cuttings was increased by pine bark and ammoniated nitrogen compared to the remaining treatments. The control treatment resulted in the highest number of roots per softwood cutting. None of the treatments increased the number of roots of softwood cuttings and the number of alive cuttings was increased by all treatments compared to the control.</p>
Development of mathematical model for abiotic stresses and cotton fiber quality by Suresh Bajirao Lokhande( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abiotic stresses cause extensive losses to agriculture production worldwide. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important fiber crop grown widely in subtropical region where temperature, water and nutrients are the common factors limiting crop production. Such losses could be more severe in the future climate as intensity and frequency of those stresses are projected to increase. The overall goal of this study was to evaluate effects of abiotic stresses on cotton reproductive performance and develop functional algorithms for fiber properties in response to different stress factors. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of temperature, water, and nitrogen in naturally-lit growth chambers. Influence of potassium nutrition was conducted in outdoor pot culture facility. In all experiments, upland cotton cultivar TM-1, a genetic standard, was used by imposing treatments at flowering. In all experiments, growth and photosynthesis measurements were recorded frequently during the treatment period. Biomass of various plant- and boll-components determined at harvest when 80% bolls were opened. Boll developmental period was tracked by daily tagging of flowers and open bolls. Bolls were grouped on the basis of onset of anthesis and lint samples were pooled together for fiber analysis. Fiber quality was assessed using High Volume Instrumentation and Advanced Fiber Information System. Total plant biomass, boll weights, and numbers significantly declined for plants grown under low and high temperature, severe water stress and nitrogen and potassium deficient conditions compared to optimum conditions for the respective stresses. Gas exchange processes were severely affected by moisture, nitrogen, and potassium deficient conditions. Time required from flower to open boll was mostly affected by growing temperature but not modified by other stresses. Fiber micronaire was most the responsive to changes in temperature, followed by strength, length and uniformity. Water limiting conditions and nitrogen defficiency severely affected strength and micronaire, whereas potassium deficiency had significant effect on fiber micronaire. This study was used to develop functional algorithms between abiotic stresses and fiber properties, once integrated into the crop simulation model. The improved crop model will be useful assist producers in optimizing planting dates, scheduling irrigation and fertigation to improve and fiber quality
SOYDATA : GLYCIM validation data sets( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Screening corn hybrids for cold tolerance using morpho-physiological traits for early season planting system( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>Earlier planting to escape summer drought and high temperature has increased the importance of cold tolerance in corn. The objectives of this study were to assess cold tolerance among the corn hybrids using morpho-physiological traits and to classify hybrids into different groups of tolerance. Corn hybrids were subjected to optimum, low, and very low temperatures during seed emergence and seedling growth and morphological and physiological traits were assessed. Variability existed among the corn hybrids for the measured traits. Total, leaf and root weights and cumulative length and length per unit volume were the most important morphological traits in describing hybrid variability. Principle component analysis and total low temperature response index methods were used to categorize hybrid tolerance to low temperature. Based on relative scores assigned in this study and their yield potential in the niche environment, producer could select hybrids to maximize corn production in an early planting production system.</p>
Somatic culture and induced mutations of giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) by Dinum Perera( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Exploiting induced genetic diversity through using mutagenesis is particularly important in giant miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus; Mxg) due to its restricted genetic variability. Experiments were conducted to develop an efficient in vitro propagation protocol for Mxg, induce mutations in Mxg using a chemical mutagen, and select Mxg in vitro for heat tolerance. To optimize in vitro propagation of Mxg, five explant types [i.e. immature inflorescences, shoot apex (in vitro), shoot apex (greenhouse), leaf explants (in vitro), and leaf explants (greenhouse)] were tested on five media. Shoot forming calli from immature inflorescences, an excellent source of explant in Mxg, grown in media with 13.6 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 0.44 microM 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) resulted in greatest shoot regeneration rate. Optimization of explant and callus type and media resulted in efficient in vitro proliferation of Mxg and the developed protocol was utilized in consecutive experiments of mutation induction and in vitro selection of Mxg for heat tolerance. Immature inflorescence explants (1-2 mm) were treated with 0.6%, 1.2%, and 1.8% of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) whereas the calli (1-2 mm³) were treated with 1.2%, 2.4%, and 3.6% of EMS for 90 min. Results of inter simple sequence repeat PCR analysis revealed polymorphisms indicating presence of genetic differences in Mxg putative mutants. In vitro callus cultures (mutagen treated and non-treated) of Mxg subjected to temperature treatments of 45±2°C for 12 hrs or 40±2°C for 7 days were selected for heat tolerance. Assessment results of electrolyte leakage and photosystem II (PS II) efficiency tests indicated a significant difference in percent membrane damage among Mxg clonal lines whereas PSII was weakly affected by the heat stress. The results suggest that in vitro derived Mxg clonal lines may be utilized for further studies of Mxg heat tolerance in developing potential Mxg ecotypes to adapt to different thermal environments. These studies provided the first investigation of in vitro induced mutagenesis in Mxg using a chemical mutagen. Genetic analysis results presented in this study indicates the potential use of developed Mxg putative mutants in future research programs, although significant morphological alterations were not observed during preliminary screening in the greenhouse
Impact of cotton seed treatments and preemergence herbicides on thrips infestationsinfestations( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<p>Research was conducted in 2013 and 2014 to evaluate the influence of cotton (<i>Gossypium hirsutum</i> L.) insecticidal seed treatments, planting date, and preemergence herbicides on thrips (<i>Frankliniella fusca</i>) infestations in cotton. Studies included a preemergence and soil texture evaluation on cotton development, an evaluation of thrips infestations, cotton development and yield following application of various preemergence herbicides and insecticidal seed treatments, and a planting date evaluation where different cultivars where planted with exclusion or inclusion of preemergence herbicide use at four different planting dates to determine the effect on thrips infestations, cotton development, and yield.</p>
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityMississippi State University

Mississippi State University. Department of Plant & Soil Sciences

Mississippi State University. Dept. of Plant and Soil Sciences

Languages
English (27)