WorldCat Identities

Barry, Dan 1958-

Overview
Works: 10 works in 40 publications in 1 language and 4,247 library holdings
Genres: Pictorial works  History  Juvenile works  Biography‡vAnecdotes  Anecdotes  Biographies  Case studies  Documentary films  Short films 
Roles: Author, Narrator
Classifications: HV6432, 973.9310222
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Dan Barry
 
Most widely held works by Dan Barry
A nation challenged : a visual history of 9/11 and its aftermath by New York Times (Périodique)( Book )

8 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,409 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A photographic chronicle of the "New York Times" coverage of the September 11 attacks includes original background essays by top writers and considers the worldwide aftermath of the attacks
The boys in the bunkhouse : servitude and salvation in the heartland by Dan Barry( Book )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 867 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A full-length account of the author's prize-winning New York Times story chronicles the exploitation and abuse case of a group of developmentally disabled workers, who for 25 years, were forced to work under harrowing conditions for virtually no wages until tenacious advocates helped them achieve their freedom."--
Bottom of the 33rd : hope, redemption, and baseball's longest game by Dan Barry( Book )

7 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 852 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From Pulitzer Prize-winning "New York Times" columnist Dan Barry comes the beautifully recounted story of the longest game in baseball history--a tale celebrating not only the robust intensity of baseball, but the aspirational ideal epitomized by the hard-fighting players of the minor leagues
City lights : stories about New York by Dan Barry( Book )

5 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"With a poet's eye and a journalist's curiosity about how a city works, Dan Barry shows us New York as no other writer has seen it." "The essays in City Lights capture everyday life in the city at its most ordinary and extraordinary, Wandering the city as a columnist for The New York Times, Barry visits the denizens of the Fulton Fish Market on the eve of its closing; journeys with an obsessed guide through the secret underground of abandoned subway stops, tunnels, and aqueducts; touches down in bars, hospitals, churches, diners, pools, zoos, memorabilia-stuffed apartments, at births and funerals, the places where people gather, are welcomed, or depart; talks to the ex-athlete who caught the falling baby, the performance artist who works as a mermaid, the octogenarian dancers who find quiet joy in their partnership, and the guy who waves flags over the Cross-Bronx Expressway to wish drivers safe passage. Along the way, Barry offers glimpses of New York's distant and recent past. He explains why the dust-coated wishbones hanging above the bar at McSorley's Old Ale House belong to the doughboy ghosts of World War I. He recalls a century of grandeur at the Plaza Hotel through the tales of longtime doormen who would soon be out of a job. He finds that an old man's quiet death opens back into a past that the man had spent his life denying. And, from the vantage of the Circle Line cruise around Manhattan, he joins tourists as they try to make sense of still-smoldering ruins in Lower Manhattan three weeks after September 11, 2001." "Each story in City Lights illuminates New York, as it was and as it is: always changing, always losing and renewing parts of itself, every street corner an opportunity for surprise and revelation."--Jacket
The boys in the bunkhouse : servitude and salvation in the heartland by Dan Barry( Recording )

6 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this haunting modern Dickensian story that is a literary tour de force, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Dan Barry chronicles a shameful case of exploitation and abuse in America's heartland, involving a group of developmentally disabled men and the advocates who helped them find justice and reclaim their lives.In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, a group of intellectually disabled men, all from Texas, lived in a tired old schoolhouse. Every morning, well before dawn, they were bussed to a processing plant to eviscerate turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. From 1974 until 2009, the men lived in near servitude, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse--until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious government lawyer helped these men achieve their freedom.New York Times columnist Dan Barry reveals how these men in an Iowa schoolhouse remained nearly forgotten for more than three decades. Drawing on exhaustive interviews, he dives deeply into their lives, recording their memories and suffering, their tender moments of joy and persistent hopefulness--their endurance of harrowing circumstances. Barry explores why this small heartland town remained all but blind to the men's plight, details how those responsible for such profound neglect justified their actions, and chronicles the lasting impact of a dramatic court case that has spurred advocates--as well as President Obama--to push for just pay and improved working conditions for people with disabilities.A luminous work of social justice, told with compassion and compelling detail, The Boys in the Bunkhouse is inspired storytelling and a clarion call for vigilance--an American tale that holds lasting reverberations for all of us
The Men of Atalissa( Visual )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Men of Atalissa is a documentary about 32 intellectually challenged people who were employed by Texas-based Henry's Turkey Service without proper compensation, and were abused physically and mentally, living in harsh conditions, at Atalissa, Iowa for more than 30 years beginning in the 1970s
Bottom of the 33rd : hope and redemption in baseball's longest game by Dan Barry( )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On April 18, 1981, a ball game sprang eternal. What began as a modestly attended minor-league game between the Pawtucket Red Sox and the Rochester Red Wings became not only the longest ever played in baseball history, but something else entirely. The first pitch was thrown after dusk on Holy Saturday, and for the next eight hours the night seemed to suspend its participants between their collective pasts and futures, between their collective sorrows and joys-the ballplayers; the umpires; Pawtucket's ejected manager, peering through a hole in the backstop; the sportswriters and broadcasters; a few stalwart fans shivering in the cold. With Bottom of the 33rd, celebrated New York Times journalist Dan Barry has written a lyrical meditation on small-town lives, minor-league dreams, and the elements of time and community that conspired one fateful night to produce a baseball game seemingly without end. Bottom of the 33rd captures the sport's essence: the purity of purpose, the crazy adherence to rules, the commitment of both players and fans. This genre-bending book, a reportorial triumph, portrays the myriad lives held in the night's unrelenting grip. Consider, for instance, the team owner determined to revivify a decrepit stadium, built atop a swampy bog, or the batboy approaching manhood, nervous and earnest, or the umpire with a new family and a new home, or the wives watching or waiting up, listening to a radio broadcast slip into giddy exhaustion. Consider the small city of Pawtucket itself, its ghosts and relics, and the players, two destined for the Hall of Fame (Cal Ripken and Wade Boggs), a few to play only briefly or forgettably in the big leagues, and the many stuck in minor-league purgatory, duty bound and loyal to the game. An unforgettable portrait of ambition and endurance, Bottom of the 33rd is the rare sports book that changes the way we perceive America's pastime, and America's past
This Land : When Peter Met Lori( Visual )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lori Sousa knew Peter Maxmean was her soul mate when they first met, and now they are showing how people with intellectual disabilities can live, work and thrive in a community
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.18 (from 0.13 for A nation c ... to 0.51 for This Land ...)

A nation challenged : a visual history of 9/11 and its aftermath
Alternative Names
Dan Barry American journalist

Dan Barry Amerikaans journalist

Languages
English (40)

Covers
Bottom of the 33rd : hope, redemption, and baseball's longest gameCity lights : stories about New YorkBottom of the 33rd : hope and redemption in baseball's longest gameSomething about the author