WorldCat Identities

Keitel, Elizabeth E. (Elizabeth Eva) 1947-

Overview
Works: 12 works in 47 publications in 2 languages and 420 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Academic theses  Humor  Trials, litigation, etc 
Roles: Editor, Author, Publishing director
Classifications: PA6279, 875.01
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Elizabeth E Keitel
Lucilius and satire in second-century BC Rome by Rex Wallace( )

11 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This volume considers linguistic, cultural, and literary trends that fed into the creation of Roman satire in second-century BC Rome. Combining approaches drawn from linguistics, Roman history, and Latin literature, the chapters share a common purpose of attempting to assess how Lucilius' satires functioned in the social environment in which they were created and originally read. Particular areas of focus include audiences for satire, the mixing of varieties of Latin in the satires, and relationships with other second-century genres, including comedy, epic, and oratory. Lucilius' satires emerged at a time when Rome's new status as an imperial power and its absorption of influences from the Greek world were shaping Roman identity. With this in mind the book provides new perspectives on the foundational identification of satire with what it means to be Roman and satire's unique status as 'wholly ours' tota nostra among Latin literary genres." -- Publisher's description
Urban disasters and the Roman imagination by University of Massachusetts at Amherst( )

7 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book affords new perspectives on urban disasters in the ancient Roman context, attending not just to the material and historical realities of such events, but also to the imaginary and literary possibilities offered by urban disaster as a figure of thought. Existential threats to the ancient city took many forms, including military invasions, natural disasters, public health crises, and gradual systemic collapses brought on by political or economic factors. In Roman cities, the memory of such events left lasting imprints on the city in psychological as well as in material terms. Individual chapters explore historical disasters and their commemoration, but others also consider of the effect of anticipated and imagined catastrophes. They analyze the destruction of cities both as a threat to be forestalled, and as a potentially regenerative agent of change, and the ways in which destroyed cities are revisited - and in a sense, rebuilt - in literary and social memory. The contributors to this volume seek to explore the Roman conception of disaster in terms that are not exclusively literary or historical. Instead, they explore the connections between and among various elements in the assemblage of experiences, texts, and traditions touching upon the theme of urban disasters in the Roman world
M. Tulli Ciceronis pro M. Caelio oratio by Marcus Tullius Cicero( Book )

5 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Latin text, with introduction and commentary in English Bibliography: p xxviii-xxxii
The structure of Tacitus, Annals 11 and 12 by Elizabeth E Keitel( )

14 editions published between 1900 and 1982 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Urban Disasters and the Roman Imagination( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book affords new perspectives on urban disasters in the ancient Roman context, attending not just to the material and historical realities of such events, but also to the imaginary and literary possibilities offered by urban disaster as a figure of thought. Existential threats to the ancient city took many forms, including military invasions, natural disasters, public health crises, and gradual systemic collapses brought on by political or economic factors. In Roman cities, the memory of such events left lasting imprints on the city in psychological as well as in material terms. Individual chapters explore historical disasters and their commemoration, but others also consider of the effect of anticipated and imagined catastrophes. They analyze the destruction of cities both as a threat to be forestalled, and as a potentially regenerative agent of change, and the ways in which destroyed cities are revisited -- and in a sense, rebuilt-- in literary and social memory. The contributors to this volume seek to explore the Roman conception of disaster in terms that are not exclusively literary or historical. Instead, they explore the connections between and among various elements in the assemblage of experiences, texts, and traditions touching upon the theme of urban disasters in the Roman world
Pro Caelio by Marcus Tullius Cicero( )

2 editions published in 2010 in Latin and English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A commentary of Cicero's great speech which provides insights into Roman life and culture, the nature and tools of Roman rhetoric, and the life and friendships of Cicero himself. Includes the text, extensive introduction, notes and vocabulary
Cicero : pro Caelio by Marcus Tullius Cicero( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in Undetermined and English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Urban disasters and the Roman imagination( Book )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Literary culture in early Christian Ireland : Hiberno-Latin saints' Lives as a source for seventh-century Irish history by John Higgins( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The writers of seventh-century Irish saints' Lives created the Irish past. Their accounts of the fifth-and-sixth century saints framed the narrative of early Irish Christianity for their contemporary and later audience. Cogitosus's Life of Brigit, Muirchú's and Tírechán's accounts of Saint Patrick, and Adomnán's Life of Columba have guided the understanding of early Irish history from then until now. Unlike other early texts these Lives are securely dated. Composed as tools in the discourse regarding authority in seventh-century Irish ecclesiastical and secular politics, they provide historical insights not available from other sources. In the seventh century Armagh and Kildare competed for primacy over the Irish church; these religious centers also were involved in politics, with Armagh's claims supported by the Uí Néill kings, whom Armagh supported. Kildare, in Leinster, was outside the Uí Néill political sphere. The Lives are part of the historicizing understanding of their past that the Irish developed in the seventh century. These Lives were weapons in the conflicts between North and South for political and ecclesiastical power. The authors used stories of saints to create the narrative of early Ireland. Their literary choices included the literary form of hagiography, miracle stories, and the stories' rhetorical style. The Lives are Christian biographies. They create a world through miracle stories. Individual details of expression associated ecclesiastical foundations and secular dynasties with religio-political power derived from the saints. The saints' Lives create the past by representing the words and actions of the saints in elaborately decorated language. Because of the elaborate language, the saints' words and actions acquire authoritative credibility: the rhetoric indicates that the words participate in divine reality. The source of the style of seventh-century Hiberno-Latin writing includes elements of Late Latin, the Bible, and native Irish poetry. This is not merely decorative, but functions to show that saints are not bound by mundane reality, but have a direct connection to heaven; their deeds and sayings acquire even more power and effect in this world. The style ultimately promotes the political/ecclesiastical elites of the seventh century by showing that they derived power from actions of their saints
"To weigh the world anew" : poetics, rhetoric, and social struggle, from Sidney's Arcadia to Shakespeare's theater by David Katz( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

To Weigh the World Anew examines moments of rhetorical exchange in romances written by Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, and Mary Wroth, arguing that these texts portray formal oratory as either unethical or inefficacious, while simultaneously depicting poetic or theatrical discourses as productively intervening between interlocutors of diverse social statuses. These exemplary episodes show fiction successfully mediating between different classes and genders, creating a demarcation between poetry and competing forms of eloquence and participating in the emergence of the poetical from the rhetorical. Ultimately, the repeated depiction of poesis as an efficacious form of mediation in self-reflexive romance shows that modern conceptions of poetics partially emerge as a response to a set of rapidly changing social formations
Maxim and theme in Tacitus Histories I-III by Elizabeth E Keitel( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The structure and function of speeches in Tacitus' Histories I-III by Elizabeth E Keitel( Book )

in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.70 (from 0.52 for Maxim and ... to 1.00 for The struct ...)

Lucilius and satire in second-century BC Rome
Covers
Urban disasters and the Roman imaginationM. Tulli Ciceronis pro M. Caelio oratioUrban Disasters and the Roman ImaginationPro CaelioCicero : pro CaelioUrban disasters and the Roman imagination
Alternative Names
Keitel, Elizabeth

Keitel Elizabeth 1947-....

Keitel, Elizabeth Eva 1947-

Languages
English (45)

Latin (1)