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United States Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

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Works: 241 works in 304 publications in 2 languages and 58,030 library holdings
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Most widely held works by United States
Hard lessons : the Iraq reconstruction experience by United States( Book )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 969 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the Publisher: The billions of dollars expended in Iraq constitute the largest relief and reconstruction exercise in American history. SIGIR's lessons learned capping report characterizes this effort in four phases (pre-war to ORHA, CPA, post-CPA/Negroponte era, and Khalilzad, Crocker, and the Surge). From this history, SIGIR forwards a series of conclusions and recommendations for Congress to consider when organizing for the next post-conflict reconstruction situation. Over the past five years, the United States has provided nearly fifty billion dollars for the relief and reconstruction of Iraq. This unprecedented rebuilding program, implemented after the March 2003 invasion, was developed to restore Iraq's essential services, build Iraq's security forces, create a market-based economy, and establish a democratic government-all in pursuit of U.S. interests in a stable and free Iraq. Did the U.S. rebuilding program achieve its objectives? Was the money provided well-spent or wasted? What lessons have we learned from the experience? Hard Lessons: The Iraq Reconstruction Experience, a report from the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR), answers these and other important questions by presenting a comprehensive history of the U.S. program, chiefly derived from SIGIR's body of extensive oversight work in Iraq, hundreds of interviews with key figures involved with the reconstruction program, and thousands of documents evidencing the reconstruction work that was-or was not-done. The report examines the limited pre-war planning for reconstruction, the shift from a large infrastructure program to a more community-based one, and the success of the "Surge" in 2007 and beyond. Hard Lessons concludes that the U.S. government did not have the structure or resources in place to execute the mammoth relief and reconstruction plan it took on in 2003. The lessons learned from this experience create a basis for reviewing and reforming the U.S. approach to contingency relief and reconstruction operations
Learning from Iraq by United States( )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Final Report From the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction culminates SIGIR's nine-year mission overseeing Iraq's reconstruction. It serves as a follow-up to our previous comprehensive review of the rebuilding effort, Hard Lessons: The Iraq This study provides much more than a recapitulation of what the reconstruction program accomplished and what my office found in the interstices. While examining both of these issues and many more, this report importantly captures the effects of the rebuilding program as derived from 44 interviews with the recipients (the Iraqi leadership), the executors (U.S. senior leaders), and the providers (congressional members). These interviews piece together an instructive picture of what was the largest stabilization and reconstruction operation ever undertaken by the United States (until recently overtaken by Afghanistan). The body of this report reveals countless details about the use of more than $60 billion in taxpayer dollars to support programs and projects in Iraq. It articulates numerous lessons derived from SIGIR's 220 audits and 170 inspections, and it lists the varying consequences meted out from the 82 convictions achieved through our investigations. It urges and substantiates necessary reforms that could improve stabilization and reconstruction operations, and it highlights the financial benefits accomplished by SIGIR's work: more than $1.61 billion from audits and over $191 million from investigations
Iraq reconstruction : lessons in contracting and procurement by United States( )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report provides a chronological review of the US government's contracting and procurement experience during the Iraq relief and reconstruction program. It begins by examining contracting activity early in the Iraq program and trace its evolutionary development through the efforts' succeeding phases. The concluding section lays out a series of key lessons learned followed by six recommendations for improving the U.S. government's capacity to support and executive contracting and procurement in contingency environments
Iraq reconstruction : lessons in program and project management by United States( )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 319 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The third and final report of the Lessons Learned Report of the special Inspector General for Iraq Resconstruction SIGIR). Released in March 2007, it focuses on program and project management during the U.S.-led reconstruction mission, and tracks the evolution of the three organizations responsible for providing the strategic oversight and tactical direction of the reconstruction effort: the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance, the Coalition Provisional Authority, and the U.S. Mission-Iraq
Iraq reconstruction : lessons in human capital management by United States( )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report is the product of SIGIR audits, other research, and the Lessons Learned Forum held in September 2005 at Johns Hopkins University Washington, D.C. campus. The document identifies and discusses four key components of effective human resource management: policy alignment; workforce planning; recruitment; and, continuity
Reconstruction leaders' perceptions of the Commander's Emergency Response Program in Iraq by United States( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interagency rebuilding efforts in Iraq : a case study of the Rusafa Political District by United States( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Applying Iraq's hard lessons to the reform of stabilization and reconstruction operations by United States( )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 304 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This paper addresses, and proposes an answer to, the question of who should be accountable for planning, managing, and executing stabilization and reconstruction operations (SROs). The U.S. government's existing approach provides no clear answer. Responsibilities for SROS are divided among several agencies, chiefly the Department of State, the Department of Defense, and the United States Agency for International development. As a result, lines of responsibility or accountability are not well-defined. ... This paper is divided into three parts. Part I provides a brief background on SROs. Part II posits ten targeted reforms that could improve SRO execution. Part III proposes a new structural solution to address the weaknesses in SRO planning and management: the U.S. Office for Contingency Operations."--Introduction
Fact sheet on sources and uses of U.S. funding provided in fiscal year 2006 for Iraq relief and construction : final report by United States( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 302 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The human toll of reconstruction or stabilization operations during Iraqi Freedom by United States( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 296 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Iraqi security forces : Special Operations Force program is achieving goals, but Iraqi support remains critical to success by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 287 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Attestation engagement concerning the award of non-competitive contract DACA63-03-D-0005 to Kellogg, Brown, and Root Services, Inc. by United States( )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 284 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Iraq Commander's Emergency Response Program generally managed well, but project documentation and oversight can be improved by United States( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 284 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In April 2008, the Multi-National Force-Iraq (MNF-I) and the Government of Iraq (GOI) signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) initiating the Iraq Commander's Emergency Response Program (I-CERP). Under the MOU, MNF-I is to complete urgent reconstruction projects to aid Iraqi citizens in the 15 provinces not under the Kurdish Regional Government using GOI funds and existing coalition spending mechanisms managed by the Multi-National Corps-Iraq (MNC-I). Initially, GOI indicated it would provide $300 million for I-CERP-related projects, but decreased that amount by 10% ($30 million)1 at the time it signed the MOU. In May 2009, the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) and Iraq's Board of Supreme Audit (BSA), agreed to conduct a joint review of I-CERP. On July 16, 2009, BSA issued a report titled, "Review and Audit of the Projects Executed by the U.S. [Corps] of Engineers." See Appendix C for a copy of this report. The I-CERP MOU between MNF-I and Iraq?s Supreme Reconstruction Council of the Secretariat of the Council of Ministries defines the purpose of the program and the responsibilities of both MNF-I and GOI. It requires that MNF-I expend I-CERP funds using the procedures, project purchasing officers,2 paying agents,3 and accountability mechanisms already established for the Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP). In addition, the MOU requires that I-CERP funds be distributed among the provinces commensurate with the population of each province. Finally, the MOU requires that MNF-I report the I-CERP program status to GOI on a quarterly basis and train Iraqi security forces to enable them to manage I-CERP
Management of rapid regional response program grants in south-central Iraq by United States( )

4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 283 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Commander's Emergency Response Program : hotel construction completed, but project management issues remain by United States( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (SIGIR) has issued five reports on the management controls and accountability of Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP) funds. This report focuses on the outcomes, cost, and oversight of one of the larger CERP projects: a $4.2 million project awarded to TAMA Design Consulting and Construction that provides international travelers and the public with hotel accommodations near the Baghdad Airport -- the Baghdad International Airport Caravan Hotel. SIGIR's reporting objectives for this audit are to examine: (1) contract outcome, cost, and schedule; (2) project justification and compliance with CERP guidelines; (3) contract oversight; (4) coordination of the project among U.S. Government agencies and with the Government of Iraq (GOI); and (5) transfer of the project to the GOI. SIGIR recommends that the Commanding General, Multi-National Corps-Iraq (MNC-I) take actions to do the following: (1) update CERP guidelines to reflect new policies and procedures requiring electronic fund transfers; (2) conduct a legal review of the hotel construction contract and the current hotel management contract to confirm that relevant legal authorities supporting major actions and decisions have been identified and are fully documented; (3) review the contract issues identified in this report, including contract award, payments, construction delays, and record keeping processes; and (4) develop a plan for turning the project over to the GOI. SIGIR received written comments from the Multi-National Force-Iraq (MNF-I). Their recommendations were directed to MNC-I, a subordinate command of MNF-I. MNF-I concurred with the report's recommendations and provided additional comments. MNF-I stated that MNC-I is currently working on a plan to turn the Caravan Hotel over to the GOI
Management of the Commander's Emergency Response Program for fiscal year 2005 by United States( )

4 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Unclassified summary of SIGIR's review of efforts to increase Iraq's capability to protect its energy infrastructure by United States( )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 282 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Iraqi security forces : weapons provided by the U.S. Department of Defense using the Iraq Relief and Reconstruction fund by United States( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 281 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This audit addresses the type, quantity, and quality of weapons purchased with the Iraq Relief and Reconstruction Fund for the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF), as well as the ISF's capability to independently maintain these weapons
Sons of iraq program : results are uncertain and financial controls were weak by United States( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 281 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In September 2006, enemy-initiated attacks in Iraq had reached some of the highest levels since the U.S. invasion in March 2003. These attacks, initiated primarily by members of Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI), were against both Iraqi citizens and Coalition Forces. At the same time, Coalition Forces found that citizens in Anbar Province were reacting very strongly against the violence. Hoping to take advantage of the backlash, Coalition Forces met with groups and tribes, some of whom previously worked with AQI to convince them to work as allies against AQI. Ultimately this dialog led to a program called the Sons of Iraq (SOI). In June 2007 the Multi-National Corps-Iraq (MNC-I) began using Commander's Emergency Response Program (CERP) funds to hire passive supporters and former insurgents to guard checkpoints, buildings, and key parts of neighborhoods. The SOI program, in combination with other events, most notably the 2007 surge of U.S. forces into Iraq, has been credited with helping reduce the overall levels of violence. During the course of the program, MNC-I spent approximately $370 million of fiscal year 2007 through 2009 CERP funds. Past SIGIR reports have identified weaknesses in the management of CERP funds, and SIGIR investigators have conducted numerous criminal investigations of individual misconduct related to CERP-funded activities. In one example, in December 2009, a U.S. Army Captain pled guilty to stealing approximately $690,000, primarily SOI funds. Given the large amount of funding, the previously reported management weaknesses, the burgeoning CERP-related criminal cases, and the risk associated with giving large amounts of funds to former insurgents, SIGIR initiated a review of the SOI program."--DTIC
 
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Hard lessons : the Iraq reconstruction experience
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Alternative Names

controlled identityCoalition Provisional Authority. Office of the Inspector General

controlled identityUnited States. Department of Defense

controlled identityUnited States. Department of State

Amerikas Savienotās Valstis. Dept. of Defense. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

Amerikas Savienotās Valstis. Dept. of State. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

Etats-Unis Department of defense Office of the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction

Etats-Unis Department of State Office of the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction

Etats-Unis. Office of the special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction

Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

SIGIR

Sjedinjene Američke Države. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

Special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction

Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (Amerikas Savienotās Valstis)

Special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction Etats-Unis

Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction (U.S.)

Special Inspector General Iraq Reconstruction

U.S. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

United States. Department of Defense. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

United States. Department of State. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

United States. Dept. of Defense. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

United States. Dept. of State. Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

United States Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

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English (70)

Arabic (1)