WorldCat Identities

Charlton, Andrew (Andrew Henry George) 1978-

Overview
Works: 38 works in 154 publications in 8 languages and 4,236 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HF1413, 382.3
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Andrew Charlton
Fair trade for all : how trade can promote development by Joseph E Stiglitz( Book )

61 editions published between 2005 and 2010 in 8 languages and held by 3,400 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nobel Prize winner Stiglitz joins with fellow economist Andrew Charlton to offer an argument about how globalization can actually help Third World countries. They address one of the key issues--how can the poorer countries of the world be helped to help themselves through freer, fairer trade? To answer this question, the authors put forward a radical and realistic new model for managing trading relationships between the richest and the poorest countries, designed to open up markets in the interests of all nations and not just the most powerful economies, to ensure that trade promotes development, and to minimize the costs of adjustments. Beginning with a brief history of the World Trade Organization, the authors explore the failure of the 2003 Cancun summit and the obstacles that face the Doha Round of negotiations. Finally they spell out the reforms and principles upon which a successful agreement must be based.--From publisher description
Man-made world : choosing between progress and planet by Andrew Charlton( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We shouldn't be too hard on ourselves, my German colleague said to me. We have to be realistic about the problem. The world is split between those who want to save the planet and those who want to save themselves. In QE44, Andrew Charlton exposes the rift that will shape our future - progress versus planet; rich versus poor. Who, then, will save us? Charlton shows there are two leading candidates: economists and environmentalists. Each says they know what is best for our grandchildren. Yet environmentalists see economists as merchants of greed with a blind faith in markets. And economists see environmentalism as an indulgence for the middle class of richer nations; those who enjoy the lifestyle afforded by economic growth, but take its source for granted. In Australia, this battle has plunged our politics into one of its most tumultuous periods, splitting the business community; driving a wedge between the left and right of the Liberal Party; separating Labor's working-class from its progressive supporters; propelling the rise of the Greens and stirring up their counterweight in rural protest. Across the globe, economists and environmentalists vie over who has the right response to climate change, population or food; security issues. In this groundbreaking essay Charlton argues that our descendants will only thank us if we find a way to preserve both the natural world and human progress
The development round of trade negotiations in the aftermath of Cancún by Joseph E Stiglitz( Book )

5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 134 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This new Commonwealth report presents the pro-development priorities that it recommends should form the core of the Doha Round agreements and sets out the key steps required for a true development round agenda. In the aftermath of the failure of Cancun, there is a need to reassess the direction of global trade negotiations. It argues that the Doha Round agenda was set by the special interests of advanced industrial countries to serve their own needs."--Jacket
Ozonomics : inside the myth of Australia's economic superheroes by Andrew Charlton( Book )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in English and held by 96 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We're living through the second longest boom in Australian history. You can't move for talk of the budget surplus. The Liberals proclaim their impeccable economic record; Labor counterclaim that they sowed the seeds during their time in government. So who's right? Does it matter? And what does it all mean anyway?
The right to trade : rethinking the aid for trade agenda by Joseph E Stiglitz( Book )

6 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aid for trade has not delivered on its initial promise. To create a genuinely pro-development trade liberalisation agenda, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E Stiglitz and Andrew Charlton put forward proposals that will help international trade work for developing countries and preserve a development-friendly multilateral trading system
International financial integration and entrepreneurial firm activity by Laura Alfaro( )

9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"We explore the relation between international financial integration and the level of entrepreneurial activity in a country. We use a unique firm level data set of approximately 24 million firms in nearly 100 countries in 2004 and 1999, which enables us to present both cross-country and industry level evidence. We establish robust cross-country correlations between increased international financial integration and the activity of entrepreneurs using various proxies for entrepreneurial activity such as entry, size, and skewness of the firm-size distribution and de jure and de facto measures of international capital integration. We then explore causal channels through which foreign capital may encourage entrepreneurship. We find evidence that entrepreneurial activity in industries which are more reliant on external finance is disproportionately affected by international financial integration, suggesting that foreign capital may improve access to capital either directly or through improved domestic financial intermediation. Second we find that entrepreneurial activity is higher in industries which have a large share of foreign firms or in vertically linked industries."
Intra-industry foreign direct investment by Laura Alfaro( )

9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We use a new firm level data set that establishes the location, ownership, and activity of 650,000 multinational subsidiaries -- close to a comprehensive picture of global multinational activity. A number of patterns emerge from the data. Most foreign direct investment (FDI) occurs between rich countries. The share of vertical FDI (subsidiaries which provide inputs to their parent firms) is larger than commonly thought, even within developed countries. More than half of all vertical subsidiaries are only observable at the four-digit level because the inputs they are supplying are so proximate to their parent firms' final good that they appear identical at the two-digit level. We call these proximate subsidiaries 'intra-industry' vertical FDI and find that their location and activity are significantly different to the inter-industry vertical FDI visible at the two-digit level. These subsidiaries are not readily explained by the comparative advantage considerations in traditional models, where firms locate their low skill production stages abroad in low skill countries to take advantage of factor cost differences. We find that overwhelmingly, multinationals tend to own the stages of production proximate to their final production giving rise to a class of high-skill intra-industry vertical FDI
Incentive Bidding for Mobile Investment by Andrew Charlton( )

5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Competition among governments to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) has grown significantly. This paper investigates the extent to which the size of incentive packages offered to investors by governments is driven by competitive pressure to attract mobile investment projects. It finds that such competition is in many cases a significant determinant of the size and nature of investment incentives.Competition can have both positive and negative effects on domestic and international welfare. Negative outcomes typically occur when governments offer attraction packages that are larger than the value of the benefits to the host economy, or when governments resort to inefficient incentive instruments.Increased transparency would significantly reduce the scope for negative welfare outcomes. Proper accounting for incentives helps to ensure that expenditure is aligned with policy goals, reduces the potential for corruption and improves the efficiency of the negotiation process
Firm-size distribution and cross-country income differences by Laura Alfaro( )

6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We investigate, using firm level data for 79 developed and developing countries, whether differences in the allocation of resources across heterogeneous plants are a significant determinant of cross-country differences in income per worker. For this purpose, we use a standard version of the neoclassical growth model augmented to incorporate monopolistic competition among heterogeneous firms. For our preferred calibration, the model explains 58% of the log variance of income per worker. This figure should be compared to the 42% success rate of the usual model
Plant-Size Distribution and Cross-Country Income Differences. by Laura Alfaro( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We investigate, using plant-level data for 79 developed and developing countries, whether differences in the allocation of resources across heterogeneous plants are a significant determinant of cross-country differences in income per worker. For this purpose, we use a standard version of the neoclassical growth model augmented to incorporate monopolistic competition among heterogeneous plants. For our preferred calibration, the model explains 58% of the log variance of income per worker. This figure should be compared to the 42% success rate of the usual model
Incentive Bidding for Mobile Investment : Economic Consequences and Potential Responses by Andrew Charlton( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Competition among governments to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) has grown significantly. This paper investigates the extent to which the size of incentive packages offered to investors by governments is driven by competitive pressure to attract mobile investment projects. It finds that such competition is in many cases a significant determinant of the size and nature of investment incentives.Competition can have both positive and negative effects on domestic and international welfare. Negative outcomes typically occur when governments offer attraction packages that are larger than the value of the benefits to the host economy, or when governments resort to inefficient incentive instruments. Increased transparency would significantly reduce the scope for negative welfare outcomes. Proper accounting for incentives helps to ensure that expenditure is aligned with policy goals, reduces the potential for corruption and improves the efficiency of the negotiation process
Man-made world : choosing between progress and planet by Andrew Charlton( Recording )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In QE44, Andrew Charlton exposes the rift that will shape our future progress versus planet; rich versus poor. Who, then, will save us? Charlton shows there are two leading candidates: economists and environmentalists. Each says they know what is best for our grandchildren. Yet environmentalists see economists as merchants of greed with a blind faith in markets. And economists see environmentalism as an indulgence for the middle class of richer nations; those who enjoy the lifestyle afforded by economic growth, but take its source for granted. In Australia, this battle has plunged our politics into one of its most tumultuous periods, splitting the business community; driving a wedge between the left and right of the Liberal Party; separating Labor's working-class from its progressive supporters; propelling the rise of the Greens and stirring up their counterweight in rural protest. Across the globe, economists and environmentalists vie over who has the right response to climate change, population or food security issues. In this groundbreaking essay Charlton argues that our descendants will only thank us if we find a way to preserve both the natural world and human progress
Capital markets, ownership and distance by Wendy Carlin( Book )

6 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses a new data-set to examine how internal capital markets and foreign ownership affect investment. Our data allow us to compare investment behaviour of listed subsidiaries with stand-alone firms while controlling for investment opportunities of parent and subsidiary firms. We evaluate how the size of ownership and the geographical proximity of majority owners to their subsidiaries affect firm investment efficiency. We find that the investment of subsidiaries is more sensitive to investment opportunities than that of standalone firms and falls when investment opportunities of parent firms improve. This suggests that there are internal capital markets that reallocate funds towards units with better investment opportunities. We find that investment allocation is most efficient where parents have modest ownership stakes and are distant from their subsidiaries and when subsidiaries operate in well developed financial markets. These results indicate that influence costs imposed by dominant parents may outweigh their potential informational benefits, especially when subsidiaries are located in countries with weaker financial development
Quarterly Essay 54 Dragon's Tail : the Lucky Country After the China Boom by Andrew Charlton( Book )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Dragon's Tail, Andrew Charlton explores the supercharged rise of China and considers Australia's future as the Chinese dragon stirs and shifts. China's rise has been perhaps the most significant economic event in two centuries, occurring 100 times more quickly and on a scale 1000 times larger than Britain's Industrial Revolution. Since 2000, Australia has been an essential part of this transformation, providing the raw materials to feed China's frantic manufacture of steel vertebrae for everything from cars and trucks to railways, apartments and office towers. China's appetite for resources
How trade can promote development by Joseph E Stiglitz( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors address one of the key issues facing world leaders today, putting forward a radical and realistic new model for managing trading relationships between the richest and the pooorest countries
International financial integration and entrepreneurship by Laura Alfaro( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We explore the relation between international financial integration and the level of entrepreneurial activity in a country. Using a unique data set of approximately 24 million firms in nearly 100 countries in 1999 and 2004, we find suggestive evidence that international financial integration has been associated with higher levels of entrepreneurial activity. Our results are robust to using various proxies for entrepreneurial activity such as entry, size, and skewness of the firm-size distribution; controlling for level of economic development, regulation, institutional constraints, and other variables that might affect the business environment; and using different empirical specifications. We further explore various channels through which international financial integration can affect entrepreneurship (a foreign direct investment channel and a capital/credit availability channel) and provide consistent evidence to support our results
Quarterly Essay 44 Man-Made World : Choosing between Progress and Planet by Andrew Charlton( Book )

3 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Witnessing at first-hand the failure of the Copenhagen Climate Conference and wondering what went wrong, Andrew Charlton realised the truth of a colleague's words: "The world is split between those who want to save the planet and those who want to save themselves." In this groundbreaking essay, Charlton discusses the rift that will shape our future: progress versus planet; rich versus poor. In recent times environmentalists have argued with mounting force that the growth of human activity on our planet is unsustainable. We are, they claim, on a collision course with destiny. But, the de
Growth and the quality of foreign direct investment : is all FDA equal? by Laura Alfaro( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper we distinguish different "qualities" of FDI to re-examine the relationship between FDI and growth. We use 'quality' to mean the effect of a unit of FDI on economic growth. However this is difficult to establish because it is a function of many different country and project characteristics which are often hard to measure Hence, we differentiate "quality FDI" in several different ways. First, we look at the possibility that the effects of FDI differ by sector. Second, we differentiate FDI based on objective qualitative industry characteristics including the average skill intensity and reliance on external capital. Third, we use a new dataset on industry-level targeting to analyze quality FDI based on the subjective preferences expressed by the receiving countries themselves. Finally, we use a two-stage least squares methodology to control for measurement error and endogeneity. Exploiting a new comprehensive industry level data set of 29 countries between 1985 and 2000, we find that the growth effects of FDI increase when we account for the quality of FDI
International financial integration and entrepreneurship by Laura Alfaro( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We explore the relation between international financial integration and the level of entrepreneurial activity in a country. Using a unique data set of approximately 24 million firms in nearly 100 countries in 1999 and 2004, we find suggestive evidence that international financial integration has been associated with higher levels of entrepreneurial activity. Our results are robust to using various proxies for entrepreneurial activity such as entry, size, and skewness of the firm-size distribution; controlling for level of economic development, regulation, institutional constraints, and other variables that might affect the business environment; and using different empirical specifications. We further explore various channels through which international financial integration can affect entrepreneurship (a foreign direct investment channel and a capital/credit availability channel) and provide consistent evidence to support our results
Growth and the quality of foreign direct investment : is all FDI equal by Laura Alfaro( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper we distinguish different "qualities" of FDI to re-examine the relationship between FDI and growth. We use 'quality' to mean the effect of a unit of FDI on economic growth. However, this is difficult to establish because it is a function of many different country and project characteristics which are often hard to measure. Hence, we differentiate "quality FDI" in several different ways. First, we look at the possibility that the effects of FDI differ by sector. Second, we differentiate FDI based on objective qualitative industry characteristics including the average skill intensity and reliance on external capital. Third, we use a new dataset on industry-level targeting to analyze quality FDI based on the subjective preferences expressed by the receiving countries themselves. Finally, we use a two-stage least squares methodology to control for measurement error and endogeneity. Exploiting a new comprehensive industry level data set of 29 countries between 1985 and 2000, we find that the growth effects of FDI increase when we account for the quality of FDI
 
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Audience level: 0.29 (from 0.21 for Fair trade ... to 0.89 for Growth and ...)

Fair trade for all : how trade can promote development How trade can promote development
Covers
The development round of trade negotiations in the aftermath of CancúnOzonomics : inside the myth of Australia's economic superheroesHow trade can promote development
Alternative Names
Charlton, Andrew.

Charlton, Andrew, 1978-

Charlton, Andrew Henry George

Charlton, Andrew Henry George 1978-

찰턴, 앤드루 1978-

찰튼, 앤드류 1978-

チャールトン, アンドリュー

Languages