WorldCat Identities

Morgan, Daniel (Daniel L.)

Overview
Works: 9 works in 32 publications in 1 language and 188 library holdings
Classifications: JK1108,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Daniel Morgan Publications about Daniel Morgan
Publications by  Daniel Morgan Publications by Daniel Morgan
Most widely held works by Daniel Morgan
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration overview, FY2006 budget in brief and key issues for Congress by Marcia S Smith ( Book )
6 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducts U.S. civilian space activities. For FY2006, NASA requested 16,456.3 million, a 2.4%increase over the 16,070.4 million it received in the FY2005 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 108-447), or 1.6% more than the total of 16,196.4 million it received for FY2005, including a hurricane supplemental. The final version of the FY2006 appropriations bill that includes NASA (H.R. 2862) approves 16,456.8 million (500,000 above the request); it is awaiting signature by the President. A NASA authorization bill (H.R. 3070) passed the House with a 510 million increase above the request; the Senate-passed version (S. 1281) has a 100 million increase. The Administration included 324.8 million for NASA in the October 28, 2005 reallocation package that includes funds for hurricane relief. This report is updated regularly
Hubble Space Telescope NASA's plans for a servicing mission by Daniel Morgan ( Book )
6 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) estimates that without a servicing mission to replace key components, the Hubble Space Telescope will cease scientific operations in 2008. In January 2004, the-NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced that the space shuttle would no longer be used to service Hubble. He indicated that this decision was based primarily on safety concerns in wake of the space shuttle Columbia accident in 2003. Many critics, however, saw it as the result of the new Vision for Space Exploration, announced by President Bush in January 2004, which focuses NASA's priorities on human and robotic exploration of the solar system. Hubble supporters sought to reverse the decision and proceed with a shuttle servicing mission. Michael Griffin, who became NASA Administrator in April 2005, stated that he would reassess whether to use the shuttle to service Hubble after there were two successful post-Columbia shuttle flights. The second post-Columbia flight took place successfully in July 2006. In October 2006, NASA approved a shuttle mission to service Hubble. That mission is now scheduled for October 8, 2008
National Aeronautics and Space Administration overview, FY2008 budget in brief and key issues for Congress by Daniel Morgan ( Book )
6 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory) proposal by Richard E Rowberg ( Book )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Biometric identifiers and border security 9/11 Commission recommendations and related issues by Daniel Morgan ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Hubble Space Telescope should NASA proceed with a servicing mission? by Marcia S Smith ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's FY2006 budget request description, analysis, and issues for Congress by Marcia S Smith ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The DHS Directorate of Science and Technology : key issues for Congress by Dana A Shea ( Book )
5 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Directorate of Science and Technology is the primary organization for research and development (R & D) in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). In the past, some Members of Congress and other observers have been highly critical of the directorate's performance. Although management changes have somewhat muted this criticism in recent years, fundamental issues remain. Among these are: the allocation of R & D funding within the directorate's programs, including the balance among basic research, applied research, and development and the proportion of funds allocated to government, industry, and academia; how the directorate sets priorities, including its use of strategic planning documents, its system of Integrated Product Teams, and the extent to which it bases priorities on risk assessment; the nature and effectiveness of the directorate's relationships with other federal R & D organizations, such as the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, other organizations inside DHS, the Department of Energy national laboratories, and other agencies; the definition of the directorate's mission, such as identification of its customers, the scope of its R & D role within DHS, and the extent of its non-R & D missions; the directorate's budgeting and financial management, including the quality of its budget documents and the persistence of unobligated balances; the directorate's responsiveness to Congress; and the establishment of metrics and goals for evaluating the directorate's output
The Advanced Spectroscopic Portal program background and issues for Congress by Dana A Shea ( Book )
2 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is charged with developing and procuring equipment to prevent a terrorist nuclear or radiological attack in the United States. At the forefront of DNDO's efforts are technologies currently deployed and under development whose purpose is to detect smuggled nuclear and radiological materials. These technologies include existing radiation portal monitors and next-generation replacements known as advanced spectroscopic portals (ASPs). Radiation portal monitors are used to detect radiation being emitted by conveyances, such as trucks, that are entering the United States. Combined with additional equipment to identify the source of the emitted radiation, they provide for a detection and identification capability to detect smuggled nuclear and radiological materials. The ASPs currently under testing integrate these detection and identification steps into a single process. By doing so, DHS aims to reduce the impact of such radiation screening on commerce while increasing its ability to detect illicit nuclear material
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.93 (from 0.47 for The Advanc ... to 0.96 for National A ...)
Languages
English (32)