WorldCat Identities

American National Election Studies

Overview
Works: 14 works in 14 publications in 1 language and 72 library holdings
Genres: Bibliography  Software 
Classifications: JF1001,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about American National Election Studies
 
Most widely held works by American National Election Studies
American National Election Studies (ANES) Panel Study, 2008-2009( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 2008-2009 ANES Panel Study is a telephone-recruited Internet panel with two cohorts recruited using nearly identical methods. The first cohort was recruited in late 2007 using random-digit-dialing (RDD) methods common to telephone surveys. Prospective respondents were offered $10 per month to complete surveys on the Internet each month for 21 months, from January 2008 through September 2009. Those without a computer and Internet service were offered a free web appliance, MSN TV 2, and free Internet service for the duration of the study. The second cohort was recruited the same way in the summer of 2008 and asked to join the panel beginning in September 2008. The recruitment interview was conducted by telephone in nearly all cases. A small number of respondents completed the recruitment survey on the Internet after failing to complete a telephone interview. Before the first monthly survey, most respondents also completed an online profile survey consisting primarily of demographic questions
American National Election Studies (ANES) panel recontact study, 2010( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ANES 2010 Panel Recontact Study is a reinterview of the ANES 2008-2009 Panel Study panelists. Those who previously completed at least one ANES wave of the Panel Study before November 2008 and who also completed the November 2008 (post-election) wave were invited to complete a follow-up interview in June 2010. Data collection ended in July 2010. The study was conducted entirely on the Internet from a sample selected and recruited by telephone. It represents United States citizens aged 18 years or older as of election day in November 2008. The questions on the recontact survey covered numerous topics. Many questions were previously asked on earlier waves of the ANES 2008-2009 Panel Study. Topics included interest in politics, cosmopolitanism, efficacy, trust in government, divided government, attitudes toward parties, personality, economic peril, race discrimination, numerous policy attitudes, and income inequality. See the questionnaire in the user guide for question wording. Demographic variables include respondent income, political party affiliation, religiosity, employment status, and household income
American National Election Studies (ANES) cumulative data file, 1948-2008( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This collection pools common variables from each of the biennial National Election Studies conducted since 1948. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The data provided in this cumulative file include a series of demographic variables and measures of social structure, partisanship, candidate evaluation, retrospective and incumbent presidential evaluation, public opinion, ideological support for the political system, mass media usage, and equalitarianism and post-materialism. Additional items provide measures of political activity, participation, and involvement, and voting behavior and registration (including results of vote validation efforts). In 2001, corrections were made to variables VCF0902, VCF0904, and VCF0905
American National Election Studies Evaluations of Government and Society Study 1 (EGSS 1), 2010-2012( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The American National Election Studies: Evaluations of Government and Society Study 1 (EGSS 1), 2010-2012, is a series of relatively small, short, cross-sectional studies of the American electorate. Its chief aims are to measure public opinion well in advance of the 2012 election and to pilot test new instrumentation. Survey questions for the EGSS mainly come from the public proposal process on the American National Election Studies Online Commons. Topics include vote choice, Tea Party support, interest in politics, attitudes toward political parties, candidates, and Obama, political participation and knowledge, tax policy, racial attitudes, and the war in Afghanistan. Data collection is on the Internet using nationally representative probability samples. EGSS is not a panel design; different respondents complete each survey. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education, employment status, occupation, household income, household size, household type, marital status, religious preferences, religiosity, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and whether respondent is a citizen of the United States. Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR32701.v1
American National Election Study : 2016 pilot study( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These data are being released as a preliminary version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by ICPSR at this time, and data are released in the format provided by the principal investigators. As the study is processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR in the future, users will be able to download the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support, and we will work with you to resolve any data-related issues
ANES 2000 time series study( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES) entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election reinterview. A freshly drawn cross-section of the electorate was taken to yield 1,807 cases. Because the study includes a carefully designed mode experiment, the data represent two presidential studies in 2000, side by side. The core study preserves the past commitment to probability area sampling and face-to-face interviewing: 1,000 respondents were interviewed prior to the election and 694 were reinterviewed face-to-face after the election. Supporting the core study, random-digit dial sampling and telephone interviewing were used: 803 respondents were interviewed by phone prior to the election and 862 respondents were interviewed by phone after the election. As such, the experiment examines the differences between the two modes and provides a preview of what shifting to telephone interviewing will mean for the NES time-series. The content of the 2000 election study reflects its dual purpose as a traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a mode study. Many of the substantive themes included in the 2000 questionnaires are a continuation of past topics. Interest in politics and the election was examined through questions regarding interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, and information about politics. Respondents' knowledge of candidates and the political parties was ascertained through questions evaluating the presidential candidates and placement of presidential candidates on various issue dimensions, knowledge of the religious background of the major presidential and vice-presidential candidates, partisanship and evaluations of the political parties, and knowledge of and evaluation of United States House of Representatives and United States Senate candidates. Respondents were also asked about their political participation in the November general election and in other forms of electoral campaign activity, their choice for president, their choice for the United States House of Representatives, and the United States Senate, as well as their second choice for president. Respondents were also queried about President Clinton's legacy and their knowledge of former president George Bush Sr. and his administration. Additional items focused on respondents' perceptions of personal and national economic well-being, their positions on social welfare issues (including government health insurance, federal budget priorities, and the role of government in the provision of jobs and a good standard of living), campaign finance and preference for divided government, social issues (including gun control, abortion, women's roles, the rights of homosexuals, the death penalty, school vouchers, environmental policy), racial and ethnic stereotypes, affirmative action, attitudes toward immigrants, and views on the nation's most important problem. Respondents' values and political predispositions (including moral traditionalism, political efficacy, egalitarianism, humanitarianism, individualism, and trust in government), views on fairness in elections, satisfaction with democracy, and the value of voting were also assessed. Other questions addressed social altruism, social connectedness, feeling thermometers on a wide range of political figures and political groups, affinity with various social groups, and detailed demographic information and measures of religious affiliation and religiosity. Several new concepts were also addressed in the 2000 study and include measures of social trust derived from perceptions of the trustworthiness of neighbors and coworkers. Voter turnout was also investigated with expanded response categories to help respondents be more accurate in determining whether they did in fact vote in November 2000. The concept of political knowledge was also addressed with new instructions encouraging respondents to take their best guess when answering the political knowledge questions. The 2000 study also incorporated a social network battery, based entirely on the perceptions of survey respondents regarding the characteristics of their identified discussants. Two brief but reliable measures of cognitive style, the need for cognition and the need to evaluate, were also included in this study. Another important feature of the 2000 NES is the mode experiment, which supplies the ability to compare interviews taken in person with interviews taken over the phone. This carefully designed mode experiment, driven by theoretical and practical interest, allows scholars to test the consequences of survey mode on data quality and reliability. The 2000 study incorporates numerous experiments that examine the effects of mode: 7-point scales and branching, response order, "don't know" filters, and social desirability. Demographic variables include gender, race, employment status, and length of residency in the community
ANES 2004 time series and panel contextual file( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES) Series, a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1948, and designed to gather information on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, as well as their perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 ANES auxiliary file of contextual data was created to provide a core of information for analysts interested in examining the 2004 general elections in a larger framework; thus, the dataset includes candidate biographical data, as well as information about past elections, expenditures, House and Senate member records and ratings, and district and state descriptions. The 436 records represent all of the United States Congressional Districts (and, for population description, the District of Columbia) and therefore may be used with both the ANES 2004 TIME SERIES STUDY [ICPSR 4245] and the ANES 2004 PANEL STUDY [ICPSR 4293]
The ANES bibliography( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The ANES Bibliography gathers together citations of all known works that make use of ANES. Both authors and co-authors are indexed, but entries are listed alphabetically by main author only. The bibliography is offered as a research and teaching resource that should be useful for many different purposes. Given the the importance of ANES data in the fields of electoral politics, public opinion, and political participation, the bibliography should be an excellent resource for researchers, teachers, students, and other professionals interested in research in those areas. It is not, of course, a comprehensive bibliography in those fields because only research relying at least in part on ANES data is included
ANES 1998 time series study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Substantive themes of the 1998 election study include, among others, knowledge and evaluation of the House candidates and placement of the candidates on various issue dimensions, interest in the political campaigns, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, media use, evaluation of the mass media, vote choice, partisanship, and evaluations of the political parties and the party system. Additional items focused on political participation, political mobilization, evaluations of the president and Congress, the "Lewinsky affair," egalitarianism, moral traditionalism, political trust, political efficacy, ideology, cultural pluralism, and political knowledge. Respondents were also asked about their attitudes toward a wide range of issues, including social policy, race policy, military and foreign policy, immigration, foreign imports, prayer in schools, school vouchers, the environment, the death penalty, women's rights, abortion, and religion and politics, including new measures of explicitly political and religious orientations. Demographic items such as age, sex, nationality, marital status, employment status, occupation, and education were also included
ANES 2004 time series study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES), a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 ANES data consists of a time series study conducted both before and after the 2004 presidential election in the United States. It entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election re-interview. A freshly drawn cross section of the electorate was taken, yielding 1,212 cases. Like its predecessors, the 2004 ANES was divided between questions necessary for tracking long-term trends and questions necessary to understand the particular political moment of 2004. The study maintains and extends the ANES time-series 'core' by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors: aspects of political belief and action so basic to the understanding of politics that they are monitored at every election, no matter the nature of the specific campaign or the broader setting. The study also carried topical and study-specific instrumentation. Questions covering issues prominent in 2004 addressed job outsourcing, private investment of Social Security funds, and President Bush's tax cut. Americans' views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences were also addressed. In addition, the study carried expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also extended the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout that began in 2002. The survey included information on respondent age, education level, political affiliation, race/ethnicity, marital status, and family composition
American National Election Studies cumulative data file, 1952-1994 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

American national election pilot study, spring 1979 by Warren E Miller( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In conjunction with research and development efforts for AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1980 (ICPSR 7763), this small national pilot survey was conducted utilizing 30 primary sampling units. Respondents were interviewed in March 1979 and reinterviewed in April 1979. The survey focused on the evaluation of candidates (their traits and affects), the dimensions of partisanship, assessment of inflation versus unemployment, social context (friends and neighborhood), and the follow-up of the national problems deemed most important by respondents, such as inflation, the federal budget, the balance of trade, changes in the economy, and the efficacy of governmental intervention in domestic affairs.... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/07709.xml
American National Election Study, 2004 Pre- and Post-Election Survey( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES), a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 ANES data consists of a time series study conducted both before and after the 2004 presidential election in the United States. It entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election re-interview. A freshly drawn cross section of the electorate was taken, yielding 1,212 cases. Like its predecessors, the 2004 ANES was divided between questions necessary for tracking long-term trends and questions necessary to understand the particular political moment of 2004. The study maintains and extends the ANES time-series 'core' by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors: aspects of political belief and action so basic to the understanding of politics that they are monitored at every election, no matter the nature of the specific campaign or the broader setting. The study also carried topical and study-specific instrumentation. Questions covering issues prominent in 2004 addressed job outsourcing, private investment of Social Security funds, and President Bush's tax cut. Americans' views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences were also addressed. In addition, the study carried expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also extended the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout that began in 2002. The survey included information on respondent age, education level, political affiliation,... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04245.xml
 
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English (14)