WorldCat Identities

Carter, E. W.

Overview
Works: 73 works in 175 publications in 1 language and 1,087 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: SH349, 597.5
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about E. W Carter
 
Most widely held works by E. W Carter
The effects of water release strategies on chinook returning to the Cowichan River and the Nanaimo River by N. K Hop Wo( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Nanaimo River during 2006 by G. W. F Graf( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2006, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Snuneymuxw First Nation and Nanaimo River Hatchery continued an escapement study of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. Areas of concentration for this study included: calculating Petersen population estimates through carcass mark-recapture surveys for both fall run and First Lake summer run chinook; generating an area-under-the-curve population estimate by conducting swim surveys in the lower Nanaimo River for fall run chinook; enumerating spring and summer run chinook by aerial and swim surveys; and collecting biological and coded-wire tag (CWT) data. This report presents the research methodology and discusses the results.--Includes text from document
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Cowichan River during 2004 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2004, the Biological Sciences Branch, in the Pacific Biological Station, continued a study of the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) productivity in the Cowichan River. This in-depth escapement assessment project has been in place since 1988. Major components of this study included: enumerating spawners and total return, estimating First Nations food fish catch, recording hatchery broodstock removals, and collecting biological, environmental and coded-wire tag data. Population estimates for adult and jack Chinook were determined based on the fence count since this was considered to be the most accurate enumeration method. A carcass mark-recapture study was conducted on the spawning grounds to augment the collection of biological data and to supplement the fence count population estimate
A preliminary report on the adult chinook salmon escapement study conducted on the Nanaimo River during 1996 by E. W Carter( Book )

5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1996, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Nanaimo First Nation continued a productivity study of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. Areas of concentration for this study included: i) enumeration of returning chinook; ii) collection of biological and coded-wire tag (CWT) data; iii) estimation of returning chinook using a carcass mark-recapture project as a comparison. Based on the enumeration fence count, we estimated the total return of adult fall chinook to the Nanaimo River to be 1247 in 1996. After removal of broodstock by the hatchery, the number of natural spawners was estimated at 990 for fall chinook. Based on swim survey information in the upper Nanaimo River, the total return of the spring chinook stock was estimated to be 600 adult chinook. We also looked at the effects of a water management plan implemented in 1989 to aid the upstream movement off all chinook
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Nanaimo River during 2004 by N. K Hop Wo( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2004, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Snuneymuxw First Nation and Nanaimo River Hatchery continued an escapement study of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. This report describes the methodology used and presents the results of the study that included: calculating Petersen population estimates through carcass mark-recapture surveys for both the fall run and the First Lake spring run Chinook; generating an area-under-the-curve population estimate by conducting swim surveys in the lower Nanaimo River for the fall run Chinook; enumerating the spring run Chinook by aerial over flights; and collecting biological and coded-wire tag (CWT) data
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Cowichan River during 2003 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2003, the Biological Sciences Branch, Pacific Biological Station, continued a study of chinook salmon productivity in the Cowichan River. This in-depth escapement project has been in place since 1988. Major components of this study included: enumerating spawners and total returns, estimating First Nations food fish catch, recording hatchery broodstock removals, and collecting biological, environmental and coded-wire tag data. Population estimates for adult and jack chinook were determined based on the fence count since this was considered to be the most accurate enumeration method. A carcass mark-recapture study was conducted on the spawning grounds to augment the collection of biological data and to supplement the fence count population estimate
Adult chinook escapement estimate conducted on the Nanaimo River during 1997 by E. W Carter( Book )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1997, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Nanaimo First Nation continued a productivity study of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. Areas ofconcentration for this study included: i) enumeration of returning chinook; ii) collection of biological and coded-wire tag (CWT) data; and iii) estimation of returning chinook using a carcass mark-recapture project as a comparison. Based on the enumeration fence count, we estimated the total return ofadult fall chinook to the Nanaimo River to be 1290 in 1997. After removal ofbroodstock by the hatchery, the number ofnatural spawners was estimated at 1118 for fall chinook. Based on swim survey and overflight information, the total return ofthe spring chinook stock was estimated to be 600 adult chinook. We also looked at the effects of a water management plan implemented in 1989 to aid the upstream movement of fall chinook
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Nanaimo River during 2002 by E. W Carter( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A productivity study of chinook salmon in the Nanaimo River which enumerated returning chinook, collected biological and coded-wire tag data, and estimated returning chinook using a carcass mark-recapture project as a comparison. Also examined was the effects of a water management plan implemented in 1989 to aid the upstream movement of fall chinook
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Nanaimo River during 2005 by N. K Hop Wo( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2005, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Sununeymuxw First Nation and Nanaimo River Hatchery continued an escapement study of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. This study focuses on calculating Petersen population estimates through carcass mark-recapture surveys for both fall run and First Lake summer run chinook; generating an area-under-the-curve population estimate by conducting swim surveys in the lower Nanaimo River for fall run chinook; enumerating spring run chinook by aerial surveys, and collecting biological and coded-wire tag data. This report presents the research methods and results.--Document
A preliminary report on the adult chinook productivity study conducted on the Nanaimo River during 1995 by E. W Carter( Book )

6 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this report is to present the results and describe the methodology of the adult enumeration study of the fall chinook stock on the Nanaimo River, British Columbia, and to summarize additional survey data collected on the spring stock on the river during fall 1995. Fall stock escapement was estimated using an enumeration of salmon at a counting fence and carcass mark-recapture studies. Spring stocks were estimated using swim survey and overflight information. The report also examines the effects of a water management plan implemented in 1989 to aid the upstream movement of fall chinook
Juvenile chinook production in the Nanaimo River, 2000-2002 by N. K Hop Wo( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Results of rotary auger trap sampling in the Nanaimo River, 1998 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A preliminary report on juvenile chinook production in the Cowichan River, 1999 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

4 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Results of the Chinook Assessment Study conducted on the Klinaklini River during 1997 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1997, the Biological Sciences Branch, Pacific Biological Station, conducted a study of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) productivity in th~ Klinaklini River. Major components ofthis study include: i) enumeration and distribution ofspawners, ii) collection ofbiological and environmental information, and iii) evaluation offishwheel as a stock assessment tool. A counting fence was constructed on Mussel Creek, a live mark-recapture study was conducted by tagging chiriook at the fishwheel and recapturing fish at a fence on Mussel Creek, a radio telemetry study was conducted to determine spawner distribution, and a rotary screw trap was used to determine downstream migration ofjuveniles. Total return ofadult chinook to the Klinaklini River was estimated to be 4,906 (95% CL: 3,791 - 6,021) in 1997. Spawner distribution within the watershed was determined to be 79% in Mussel Cr., 12% in Icy Cr., and 9% in Dice Cr. The majority ofchinook spawners were aged as three and four year olds and approximately 60% ofthe chinook caught in the fishwheel were considered to be stream-type
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Cowichan River during 1996 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents results of an adult chinook salmon escapement enumeration study, conducted as part of a chinook productivity study on the Cowichan River, British Columbia, during fall 1996. Components of the study included: enumeration of chinook salmon at a counting fence; estimation and biological sampling of the Native food fishery catch; recording of hatchery broodstock removals; collection of biological data and sampling of coded wire tag recoveries; and carcass mark-recapture studies for both adult and jack chinook
Results of a juvenile production study conducted on the Klinaklini River during 2001 by R. E Diewert( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exploratory fishing of Bowie Seamount by the automated longliner M/V Viking Star, August 28-September 12, 1980 by E. W Carter( Book )

5 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bowie Seamount, on the west coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands, was explored by a vessel equipped with the Mustad autoline system to determine the size and species composition of fish aggregation in the area. This report presents the results of that cruise. The commercial and scientific importance of rockfish stocks on the Seamount is briefly discussed.--Includes text from document
Adult chinook escapement assessment conducted on the Nanaimo River during 2009 by C. P Lam( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2009, Fisheries and Oceans Canada in co-operation with Snuneymuxw First Nation and Nanaimo River Hatchery continued an escapement study of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nanaimo River. Areas of concentration for this study included: i) Generating an area-under-the-curve population estimate by conducting swim surveys in the lower Nanaimo River for fall run chinook; ii) Enumerating summer run Chinook by aerial and snorkel surveys; and iii) Collecting biological and coded wire tag (CWT) data. The return of fall run adult Chinook to the Nanaimo River was estimated to be 1,470 of which 151 were collected for broodstock purposes leaving 1,319 to spawn naturally. Snorkel survey estimated the naturally spawning population of the summer stock to be 148 fish plus 163 fish collected for hatchery broodstock for a total return of 311 fish. The return of all adult Chinook, including First Nation catch, naturally spawning fall, summer and spring run and hatchery removals, to the Nanaimo River system in 2009 was estimated to be 2,230 fish
A preliminary report on juvenile chinook production of the Cowichan River, 1996 by D. A Nagtegaal( Book )

4 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1996, the Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Biological Station undertook a study of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhyncus tshawytscha) productivity in the Cowichan River. This report presents the results of the juvenile chinook production study, which includes timing of the chinook fry migration, estimates of the abundance of naturally reared chinook, juvenile chinook growth rates, and the interaction between hatchery produced and naturally reared chinook juveniles. Incidental catches of other species were also recorded
Catches and trawl locations of M/V Arctic Harvester during the Dover sole biomass survey off the west coast of Vancouver Island, February/March, 1981 by E. W Carter( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.55 (from 0.52 for Juvenile c ... to 1.00 for A remarkab ...)

Languages
English (66)