WorldCat Identities

Qatar Foundation

Overview
Works: 110 works in 123 publications in 2 languages and 1,436 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Conference proceedings  Exhibition catalogs  History 
Classifications: N6260, 709.17671
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Qatar Foundation Publications about Qatar Foundation
Publications by Qatar Foundation Publications by Qatar Foundation
Most widely held works about Qatar Foundation
 
Most widely held works by Qatar Foundation
Reflections on Islamic art ( Book )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 161 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
25 leading writers and thinkers celebrate the riches of Islamic Art in a visually stylish volume produced with the Museum of Islamic Art in Qatar and edited by Ahdaf Soueif, best-selling Booker-Prize shortlisted Egyptian-British novelist
Global cardiology science & practice ( )
in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
God is beautiful and loves beauty : the object in Islamic art and culture by Biennial Hamad bin Khalifa Symposium on Islamic Art ( Book )
2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Sustainable technologies, systems & policies ( )
in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
International review of law by Qatar Foundation ( )
in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Told untold retold : 23 stories of journeys through time and space = [Maḥkīyun makhfīyun muʻād : 23 riwāyah li-raḥalāt ʻabra al-zamān wa-al-makān by Sam Bardaouil ( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Avicenna by Qatar Foundation ( )
in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Perspectives in international librarianship ( )
in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Contemporary Islamic studies ( )
in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Aswan Heart Centre science & practice series by Qatar Foundation ( )
in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This house believes the Middle East would be better off with John McCain in the White House ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The latest Doha Debate has conclusively warned America that a victory by John McCain in the US Presidential election would further damage relations with the Middle East. Hafez al-Mirazi, the former host of Al-Jazeera's Arabic weekly television show From Washington said that just as President George W. Bush had made the Middle East "worse than it was eight years ago" so his "hawkish Republican mate" would do the same. In an opening statement that drew loud applause, Mr. al-Mirazi warned that Sarah Palin, McCain's running mate, was from the same warmongering mould as Dick Cheney, Bush"s vice-president, "who happens to be a quail hunter." Dr. Michael Signer, foreign policy adviser to Democratic Senator John Edwards' presidential campaign in 2007-2008 and a foreign policy expert, also attacked the motion and the dangers a McCain victory would present. Describing Barak Obama, the Democrat nominee, as "thoughtful and deliberate", he said such qualities were of paramount importance during the present troubled times. He said Senator Obama was an African-American who spent his formative years in Indonesia, a Muslim nation, and would be a president "who wants to understand and listen, rather than just talk." Danielle Pletka, Vice President for Foreign and Defence Policy Studies at the American Institute for Public Policy Research, supported the motion, suggesting that Senator McCain was the only Presidential candidate who would not "walk away" from Iraq, leaving the region to return to sectarian violence. Dr. Saad al-Ajmi, former Kuwaiti Minister for Information and Culture, said he supported the motion largely because he feared that Senator Obama would pull US troops out of Iraq prematurely
This house believes that Muslims are failing to combat extremism ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An overwhelming majority at the latest Doha Debate has criticised Muslims around the world for failing to combat extremism. Ed Husain, a British campaigner against fundamentalism, challenged the many Muslims who travel each year to Mecca to stand up to extremism 'right there'; claiming 'Saudi Arabia has totally demolished our heritage in Mecca and Medina.' Such public criticism of the Saudi Kingdom -- as well as Muslims in general -- is extremely rare in the Middle East. During the early 1990s Husain was a recruiter to fundamentalist groups at university campuses in the UK. Now deputy director of The Quilliam Foundation, a counter-extremism think tank, he insisted, "Muslims have to change their mindset of blaming others or we will be the laughing stock of the world." The motion was supported by US human rights lawyer Arsalan Iftikhar, who criticised Muslims for the mass demonstrations over cartoons in Denmark and the comparative silence over sectarian violence in Iraq. Speaking against the motion, Daisy Khan, executive director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement, claimed the era of extremism was over. Alongside her, Moez Masoud, a Muslim 'televangelist' watched by millions in the region, accused the media of ignoring Muslim calls for tolerance
This house believes that Gulf Arabs value profit over people ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This house believes resistance to the Arab spring is futile ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Debate whether or not resistance from governments, ruling parties, the business elite and foreign powers will be able to curb the momentum of the reformist movements in the Middle East
This house believes the face veil is a barrier to integration in the West ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The topic triggered a heated debate, in the context of the controversy raging in the West about the face veil worn by a section of Muslim women. Those who supported the motion argued that Muslims living in western societies must avoid wearing Niqab, since it is not obligatory in Islam and because it is considered as a mark of separation by the larger society. The other side maintained that wearing Niqab is totally an issue of personal freedom and the western societies, which claim to be liberal and pluralistic, are not justified in making a hue and cry on a simple piece of cloth. Speaking for the motion were Lord Ahmed of Rotherham, the first Muslim to be made a Life Peer in the United Kingdom, and Reem Maghribi, founder of Al Sharq, the premier English language British-Arab culture and lifestyle magazine. Ahmed Younis, former national director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council in the US, who will soon join as adviser to senior US government officials, and Ayshah Ismail, a teacher at a UK Muslim Girls school who voluntary wears Niqab, opposed the motion
This house believes that Arab women should have full equality with men ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A few weeks ago, women in Kuwait finally caught up to their counterparts in Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and much of the rest of the Arab world, when they were given the right to vote and run for office, the result of a 35-23 vote in parliament. Kuwaiti women won the right, however, under the condition that they abide by Islamic law. What limits will such a condition, placed by Islamic lawmakers who had previously succeeded in blocking the vote, put on the women's newly earned right to participate in the decision-making of their country? According to some fundamentalist Muslim teaching, women in Islam are not allowed the right to hold positions of political leadership. They are, however, allowed the right to divorce, inherit property, be educated and conduct business. Should Arab women enjoy equal status with men? Does equality necessarily mean the same rights? This Wednesday, June 1, four distinguished speakers will explore these and related arguments in the seventh in the series of Doha Debates, presented by the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development. Chaired by former BBC presenter Tim Sebastian, the Doha Debates revolve around a motion presented to a live audience -- in this case, 'This House believes that Arab women should have equality with men.' Two speakers argue for the motion and two speak against it. Sebastian draws out the speakers, challenging their positions, and then opens the debate to questions from the audience. Finally the audience votes to accept or reject the motion, based on the merits of the arguments the speakers have made. Speaking in favor of the motion will be Dr. Tareq Al-Suwaidan, a Kuwaiti presenter of numerous Islamic programs on local and satellite television. He will be joined by Toujan Faisal, the first woman elected into the Jordanian parliament. Speaking against the motion will be Sheikh Jihad Brown, an Islamic scholar and a consultant for various Islamic projects in the region. He will be joined by Khola Hassan, an author who has been outspoken on the position of women in Islam
al-Maktabah al-turāthīyah : mukhtārāt min kunūz al-turāth al-ʻArabī wa-al-Islāmī ( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The founder of the library, H.E. Shaikh Dr. Hasan Bin Mohamed Al-Thani ... has been able, in a period of 20 years, to collect about 85,000 titles in different subjects which some date back [to the] 15th century, the discovery of printing in Europe ... The Library was established in early 1979 when Sheikh Hassan took an initiative of collecting rare and famous European books and encyclopedias in different fields ... Today, this library is one of the most important research centres not only in the Gulf region but also in the Middle East. It contains about 85,000 invaluable books in Arabic and foreign languages, about 600 antique maps, charts and 2000 manuscripts"--P [8]
This house believes that the Middle East road map for peace is dead ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Road Map peace plan for the Middle East is in distress, and a new mood in the region could inspire the leaders of Israel and the Palestinians to get back to the negotiating table. Speaking at the Debate held February 23rd 2005, researchers discuss the topic as a vital one that concerns the whole Middle east Region and the international security. Speaking for the motion are Dr. Flynt Leverett, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy in Washington, DC., and Alastair Crooke, a co-founder of Conflicts Forum, an independent, non-profit organization that hosts professionals united by a common interest in overcoming current barriers between Islam and the West. Speaking against the motion are Ghassan Khatib, Minister of Labor for the Palestinian Authority since 2002, and Rabbi Michael Melchior, a Meimad-Labor Party member of the Israeli Knesset and Deputy Minister of Education, Culture and Sport
This house believes that the war on terror has become a war against Islam ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This week, former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani became the latest in a long line of politicians and pundits to declare that the United States-led war on terror is, in fact, a war on Islam. Is that too sinister a reading of American motivations -- Is the war on terror a well intended campaign led by the only nation powerful enough to see it through? Or is it not sinister enough -- is the US driven by an imperial ambition that does not differentiate between Christian and Muslim? This Thursday, April 28, four distinguished speakers will explore these and related arguments in the sixth in the series of Doha Debates, presented by the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development. Chaired by former BBC presenter Tim Sebastian, the Doha Debates revolve around a motion presented to a live audience -- in this case, 'This House believes that the war on terror has become a war on Islam.' Two speakers argue for the motion and two speak against it. Sebastian draws out the speakers, challenging their positions, and then opens the debate to questions from the audience. Finally the audience votes to accept or reject the motion, based on the merits of the arguments the speakers have made. Speaking in favor of the motion will be Dr. Mustafa Ceric, the Grand Mufti of Bosnia, who has been active in efforts to counter fears about Islam since the attacks of September 11, 2001. He will be joined by Anas Altikriti, a founder and former president of the Muslim Association of Britain and an organizer of demonstrations against the war in Iraq. Speaking against the motion will be Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf of New York City, founder of the American Sufi Muslim Association and the Cordoba Initiative, an inter-religious effort to improve relations between the US and the Muslim world. He will be joined by Ramzi Khoury, advisor to the editor-in-chief of the Saudi Gazette
This house believes that Arab governments are not interested in genuine reform ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Throughout most of the Arab world, poverty, unemployment, and illiteracy rates are on the rise while the quality of education, healthcare, and social safety-nets for the poor and elderly are falling to unprecedented levels. Despite these failures, the repressive governments under which they occur remain firmly entrenched. While authoritarian governments facing similar circumstances have toppled elsewhere -- as we saw in Ghana and Indonesia -- the Arab world is different. Some observers suggest its cultural and religious values are responsible. But this is simply not the case. In fact, several unique features hinder reform and block the democratic progress. First, Arab governments have poured even more money into security in recent years. This spending not only includes monitoring and punishing the opposition using traditional methods, but also exerting pressure on civil organizations and the media and even changing the composition of electoral districts. All of these efforts make it harder for citizens to organize and confront the hugely powerful regimes. Second, ruling regimes also squash reform by warning citizens that any demand for change will threaten order and stability and unleash chaos. Despite spontaneous protests increasingly seen throughout the Arab world in recent years, the government's message -- delivered largely by religious institutions and the media -- has sufficiently scared people from pursuing the kind of organized, sustained activity that could bring about real change. Third, while the elites rule with an iron fist, the resistance responds with kid gloves. Opposition leaders have failed to develop a serious message and platform about what kind of change is possible. This lack of leadership does little to reassure an anxious public that the opposition will not make an already bad situation worse. Fourth, change is unlikely to come from Islamist movements either. Although these forces have sparked excitement in Arab politics, their leaders are more interested in pursuing an ideological and religious agenda than in forging compromises with the regimes to improve people's lives. And fifth, a small group of individuals who form close alliances based on their common interests are leading these regimes. By banding together, these Arab elites limit the possibility of internal conflicts that led to the collapse of authoritarian regimes in Latin America and Eastern Europe."--Carnegie Endpwment for International Peace (abridged) -- http://www.carnegieendowment.org
 
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Alternative Names
Muʾassasat Qaṭar
Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development
مؤسسة قطر
Languages
English (28)
Arabic (1)
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