WorldCat Identities

Hegre, Håvard

Overview
Works: 38 works in 61 publications in 2 languages and 306 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Håvard Hegre
Democratic jihad? : military intervention and democracy by Nils Petter Gleditsch( )

10 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Democracies rarely if ever fight one another, but they participate in wars as frequently as autocracies. They tend to win the wars in which they participate. Democracies frequently build large alliances in wartime, but not only with other democracies. From time to time democracies intervene militarily in ongoing conflicts. The democratic peace may contribute to a normative justification for such interventions, for the purpose of promoting democracy and eventually for the promotion of peace. This is reinforced by an emerging norm of humanitarian intervention. Democracies may have a motivation to intervene in non-democracies, even in the absence of ongoing conflict, for the purpose of regime change. The recent Iraq War may be interpreted in this perspective. A strong version of this type of foreign policy may be interpreted as a democratic crusade. The paper examines the normative and theoretical foundations of democratic interventionism. An empirical investigation of interventions in the period 1960-96 indicates that democracies intervene quite frequently, but rarely against other democracies. In the short term, democratic intervention appears to be successfully promoting democratization, but the target states tend to end up among the unstable semi-democracies. The most widely publicized recent interventions are targeted on poor or resource-dependent countries in non-democratic neighborhoods. Previous research has found these characteristics to reduce the prospects for stable democracy. Thus, forced democratization is unpredictable with regard to achieving long-term democracy and potentially harmful with regard to securing peace. But short-term military successes may stimulate more interventions until the negative consequences become more visible
Population size, concentration, and civil war : a geographically disaggregated analysis by Clionadh Raleigh( )

9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why do larger countries have more armed conflict? This paper surveys three sets of hypotheses forwarded in the conflict literature regarding the relationship between the size and location of population groups: Hypotheses based on pure population mass, on distances, on population concentrations, and some residual state-level characteristics. The hypotheses are tested on a new dataset-ACLED (Armed Conflict Location and Events Dataset)-which disaggregates internal conflicts into individual events. The analysis covers 14 countries in Central Africa. The conflict event data are juxtaposed with geographically disaggregated data on populations, distance to capitals, borders, and road networks. The paper develops a statistical method to analyze this type of data. The analysis confirms several of the hypotheses
Population Size, Concentration, And Civil War : a Geographically Disaggregated Analysis by Raleigh( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Democratic Jihad? Military Intervention And Democracy by Havard Hegre( )

2 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in Undetermined and English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Democracies rarely if ever fight one another, but they participate in wars as frequently as autocracies. They tend to win the wars in which they participate. Democracies frequently build large alliances in wartime, but not only with other democracies. From time to time democracies intervene militarily in ongoing conflicts. The democratic peace may contribute to a normative justification for such interventions, for the purpose of promoting democracy and eventually for the promotion of peace. This is reinforced by an emerging norm of humanitarian intervention. Democracies may have a motivation to intervene in non-democracies, even in the absence of ongoing conflict, for the purpose of regime change. The recent Iraq War may be interpreted in this perspective. A strong version of this type of foreign policy may be interpreted as a democratic crusade. The paper examines the normative and theoretical foundations of democratic interventionism. An empirical investigation of interventions in the period 1960-96 indicates that democracies intervene quite frequently, but rarely against other democracies. In the short term, democratic intervention appears to be successfully promoting democratization, but the target states tend to end up among the unstable semi-democracies. The most widely publicized recent interventions are targeted on poor or resource-dependent countries in non-democratic neighborhoods. Previous research has found these characteristics to reduce the prospects for stable democracy. Thus, forced democratization is unpredictable with regard to achieving long-term democracy and potentially harmful with regard to securing peace. But short-term military successes may stimulate more interventions until the negative consequences become more visible
Special issue on the aftermath of civil war( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Special issue on duration and termination of civil war( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduction The Aftermath of Civil War by Ibrahim Elbadawi( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This article introduces the special issue on 'The Aftermath of Civil War' and presents the research project from which the articles in this issue originate. The article presents a few empirical observations that demonstrate the increasing importance of the post-conflict situation for actors that engage to reduce the global incidence of armed conflict. The global incidence of conflict was reduced from 1992 to 2002, since there were more terminations than onsets. Although this trend seems to have halted, a scrutiny of the onsets shows that they increasingly are recurrences of conflicts that have been inactive for a period. In 2005 and 2006, there were no new conflicts. The article then briefly introduces the six contributions to the special issue. The articles investigate the importance of peacekeeping troops, elections, aid, capital flight, and exclusion of parties from peace agreements in post-conflict situations. The articles are also applicable to countries that have not had armed conflicts, as the authors investigate the relationship between ethnic diversity and military spending and the determinants of youths' decisions to participate in rebel groups
Globalization, Economic Shocks, and Internal Armed Conflict by Ibrahim Elbadawi( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Critics of trade liberalization argue that globalization increases countries' vulnerability to economic shocks and hence may exacerbate domestic social conflict. Such social conflict may also be transformed into armed conflict. Others argue that globalization promotes economic growth and reduces poverty, which leads to a reduction in the risk of internal conflict. Several studies find trade to reduce the risk of interstate conflict. This article investigates the impact of trade and trade shocks on the risk of intrastate conflict. A set of operationalizations of economic shock is developed and used to analyze the risk of conflicts that involve at least 25 battle deaths per year. The analysis finds no robust evidence for a direct relationship between trade openness, trade shocks, and the risk of armed conflict. There is somewhat more basis for concluding that globalization affects the risk indirectly through its effect on long- and short-term growth. In the long run, trade-induced growth reduces the risk of domestic conflict
Peace and democracy : three levels of analysis by Nils Petter Gleditsch( )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Development and the liberal peace : what does it take to be a trading state? by Håvard Hegre( )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Democracy and armed conflict( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The article reviews the literature on the relationship between democracy and armed conflict, internal as well as interstate. The review points to several similarities between how democratic institutions affect both conflict types. It summarizes the main empirical findings and discusses the most prominent explanations as well as the most important objections raised to the finding, empirically and theoretically. To a large degree, the empirical finding that pairs of democratic states have a lower risk of interstate conflict than other pairs holds up, as does the conclusion that consolidated democracies have less conflict than semi-democracies. The most critical challenge to both conclusions is the position that both democracy and peace are due to pre-existing socio-economic conditions. I conclude that this objection has considerable leverage, but it also seems clear that economic development is unlikely to bring about lasting peace alone, without the formalization embedded in democratic institutions
Guerra civil y políticas de desarrollo : cómo escapar de la trampa del conflicto by Paul Collier( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in Spanish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Size Asymmetry, Trade, and Militarized Conflict by Håvard Hegre( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The security challenge in conflict-prone countries by Paul Collier.( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Regime type and political transition in civil war by Kristian Skrede Gleditsch( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The limits of the liberal peace( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The limits of the liberal peace by Håvard Hegre( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Special issue on forecasting( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The hazard of war : reassessing the evidence for the democratic peace by Arvid Baknerud( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Poverty and Conflict by Håvard Hegre( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Hegre, Haavard

Hegre, Havard

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