WorldCat Identities

Rand Safety and Justice (Program)

Overview
Works: 31 works in 85 publications in 2 languages and 7,529 library holdings
Genres: Judicial statistics  Case studies 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Rand Safety and Justice (Program)
Film piracy, organized crime, and terrorism by G.F Treverton( )

5 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 1,523 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the findings of research into the involvement of organized crime and terrorist groups in counterfeiting products ranging from watches to automobile parts, from pharmaceuticals to computer software. It presents detailed case studies from around the globe in one area of counterfeiting, film piracy, to illustrate the broader problem of criminal -- and perhaps terrorist -- groups finding a new and not-much-discussed way of funding their activities. Piracy is high in payoff and low in risk, often taking place under the radar of law enforcement. The case studies provide compelling evidence of a broad, geographically dispersed, and continuing connection between film piracy and organized crime, as well as evidence that terrorist groups have used the proceeds of film piracy to finance their activities. Counterfeiting is a threat not only to the global information economy, but also to public safety and national security. Cooperation among law enforcement and governments around the world is needed in the battle against intellectual-property theft, and meaningful progress will require increased political will, strong legislation, consistent enforcement, deterrent sentencing, and innovative solutions. The report lays out an agenda of measures. Increased global intelligence-gathering and sharing is needed to further illuminate the scope and nature of the connections between piracy and organized crime, and policymakers and law enforcement worldwide should reexamine the common but erroneous assumption that counterfeiting is a victimless crime
How effective is correctional education, and where do we go from here? : the results of a comprehensive evaluation by Lois M Davis( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,330 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

More than 2 million adults are incarcerated in U.S. prisons, and each year more than 700,000 leave federal and state prisons and return to communities. Unfortunately, within three years, 40 percent will be reincarcerated. One reason for this is that ex-offenders lack the knowledge, training, and skills to support a successful return to communities. Trying to reduce such high recidivism rates is partly why states devote resources to educating and training individuals in prison. This raises the question of how effective -- and cost-effective -- correctional education is: an even more salient question given the funding environment states face from the 2008 recession and its continuing aftermath. With funding from the Second Chance Act of 2007, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, asked RAND to help answer this question as part of a comprehensive examination of the current state of correctional education for incarcerated adults and juveniles. The RAND team conducted a systematic review of correctional education programs for incarcerated adults and juveniles. This included a meta-analysis on correctional education's effects on recidivism and postrelease employment outcomes for incarcerated adults, as well as a synthesis of evidence on programs for juveniles. The study also included a nationwide survey of state correctional education directors to understand how correctional education is provided today and the recession's impact. The authors also compared the direct costs of correctional education with those of reincarceration to put the recidivism findings into a broader context
National evaluation of Safe Start Promising Approaches : assessing program implementation( )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 617 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Safe Start Promising Approaches (SSPA) is the second phase of a community-based initiative focused on developing and fielding interventions to prevent and reduce the impact of children⁰́₉s exposure to violence (CEV). This report shares the results of SSPA, which was intended to implement and evaluate promising and evidence-based programs in community settings, and includes all data available in the project, updating an earlier report. Fifteen program sites across the country were selected to implement a range of interventions for helping children and families cope with the effects of CEV. The settings, populations served, intervention types, types of violence addressed, community partners, and program goals differed across the 15 sites. The main body of this report provides information on the designs of the studies, instruments used, data collection and cleaning, analytic methods, and an overview of the results across the 15 sites. The appendixes provide a detailed description of the outcome evaluation conducted at each SSPA program, including a description of the enrollees, enrollment and retention, the amount and type of services received, and child and family outcomes over time
Evaluation of National Institute of Justice-funded geospatial software tools : technical and utility assessments to improve tool development, dissemination, and usage by Carolyn Wong( )

6 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 616 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A geospatial software tool-evaluation study conducted for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) assessed 14 recent tool developments funded by NIJ. The study integrates input from tool developers and tool users with RAND Corporation researchers' independent tool assessments. The evaluation finds that 12 of the 14 NIJ development awards resulted in fully functional tools for the law enforcement community. Collectively, the tools provided the law enforcement community with access to new and enhanced geospatial capabilities to improve crime analysis. From a holistic perspective of NIJ's tool-development efforts, the evaluation finds that NIJ can maximize benefits on future tool developments by addressing several apparent policy gaps and inconsistencies with respect to awardee requirements and oversight, including ensuring that policies assign NIJ or Department of Justice officials roles and responsibilities for the latter phases of software development, including integration and test, implementation, operations and maintenance, and disposition; developing tool-dissemination plans; establishing go-to sources for tool-deployment notifications; establishing a process and source of funding to address limitations in the initial version of the tool, such as a small post-tool-delivery modification fund; and taking the lead to address emerging interoperability and information-sharing issues. Acting on these recommendations will ensure that NIJ consistently maximizes benefits to the law enforcement community from its future tool development awards
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2009-2010 report by Terry Fain( )

4 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 612 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program⁰́₉s funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA⁰́₉s success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their tenth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009⁰́₃2010 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Evaluation of the Shreveport predictive policing experiment by Priscillia Hunt( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 592 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Even though there is a growing interest in predictive policing, to date there have been few, if any, formal evaluations of these programs. This report documents an assessment of a predictive policing effort in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 2012, which was conducted to evaluate the crime reduction effects of policing guided by statistical predictions. RAND researchers led multiple interviews and focus groups with the Shreveport Police Department throughout the course of the trial to document the implementation of the statistical predictive and prevention models. In addition to a basic assessment of the process, the report shows the crime impacts and costs directly attributable to the strategy. It is hoped that this will provide a fuller picture for police departments considering if and how a predictive policing strategy should be adopted. There was no statistically significant change in property crime in the experimental districts that applied the predictive models compared with the control districts; therefore, overall, the intervention was deemed to have no effect. There are both statistical and substantive possibilities to explain this null effect. In addition, it is likely that the predictive policing program did not cost any more than the status quo."--"Abstract" on web page
No more rights without remedies : an impact evaluation of the National Crime Victim Law Institute's victims' rights clinics by Robert Carl Davis( )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 529 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Method -- Survey of criminal justice officials' attitudes toward and knowledge of victims' rights -- Determining compliance with victims' rights based on prosecutor records -- Surveys of victim experience in the criminal justice system -- Community impact -- Clinics' impact on the legal landscape -- Clinic sustainability -- Conclusions
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2010-2011 report by Terry Fain( )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 529 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Background and methodology -- Current JJCPA programs and FY 2010-2011 outcome measures -- Juvenile justice costs for JJCPA participants -- Summary and conclusions -- Appendix A: Community providers of JJCPA program services -- Appendix B: Comparison groups and reference periods for JJCPA programs -- Appendix C: Probation's ranking of the big six outcome measures -- Appendix D: Community-based organizations that contracted to provide services for JJCPA programs in FY 2010-2011-- Appendix E: Corrections Standards Authority-mandated and supplemental outcomes for individual JJCPA programs, FY 2010-2011-- Appendix F: Corrections Standards Authority-mandated outcomes, by gender -- Appendix G: Corrections Standards Authority-mandated outcomes, by cluster
An assessment of program sustainability in three Bureau of Justice Assistance Criminal Justice domains by Eyal Aharoni( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 527 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) aims to improve community safety through effective programming throughout the United States. To maximize the impact of its investments, BJA has an interest in supporting programs that will be sustained beyond initial federal funding. This notion of program sustainability is becoming increasingly important as programs have been challenged to operate with increasingly scarce resources. RAND Corporation researchers aimed to better understand the characteristics and environments of programs that are likely to persist beyond federal seed funding and to delineate strategies that will enable BJA to assist programs that it funds in their efforts to sustain themselves. Using archival documentation and survey methods, they assessed 231 BJA grantee programs spanning three BJA funding domains - drug courts, human trafficking, and mental health - to identify characteristics associated with sustainability. They found evidence of program sustainment in most BJA grantees studied, particularly in sustained funding. They also examined the association between organizational and contextual factors and sustained operations and sustained funding. Finally, they recommend a plan for ongoing measurement of sustainability
Long-term effects of law enforcement's post-9/11 focus on counterterrorism and homeland security( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the need for increased counterterrorism (CT) and homeland security (HS) efforts at the federal, state, and local levels has taken the spotlight in public safety efforts. In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, many law enforcement agencies (LEAs) shifted more resources toward developing CT and HS capabilities, and the federal government continues to support these efforts with grants provided through the Department of Homeland Security. This monograph examines the long-term adjustments that large urban LEAs have made to accommodate the focus on CT and HS, as well as the advantages and challenges associated with it. The study relies primarily on in-depth case studies of five large urban LEAs, as well as a review of federal HS grant programs and a quantitative analysis of the potential costs associated with shifting law enforcement personnel from traditional policing to focus on HS and CT functions. Major trends among the five case study LEAs include the creation of specialized departments and units, as well as an increased emphasis on information-sharing, which, nationwide, has led to the creation of fusion centers that serve as formal hubs for regional information-sharing networks. LEAs' HS and CT efforts are also greatly influenced by the restrictions and requirements associated with federal HS grant funding. Finally, using cost-of-crime estimates, it is possible to partially quantify the costs associated with LEAs' shifting of personnel away from traditional crime prevention toward CT and HS -- there are also clear benefits associated with law enforcement's focus on CT and HS, but they are difficult to quantify, and this is posing a challenge for LEAs as the economic downturn puts pressure on public budgets
Community-based violence prevention : an assessment of Pittsburgh's One Vision, One Life Program by Jeremy M Wilson( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2006, more than 6 million individuals were victimized by violent crimes. Although violence is below levels of the early 1990s, it remains high. The extent of violence and its impact highlight a critical need to develop and implement effective programs to reduce violence and victimization. Communities have initiated a wide range of such programs, and scholars have conducted numerous evaluations of varying quality of them. Reviews have found certain types of strategies and specific programs to be promising, but additional critical evaluations are needed to plan violence-reduction programs. This monograph assesses the implementation and impact of the One Vision One Life violence-prevention strategy in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 2003, Pittsburgh witnessed a 49-percent increase in homicides, prompting a "grassroots" creation and implementation of the One Vision One Life antiviolence strategy. This initiative used a problem-solving, data-driven model, including street-level intelligence, to intervene in escalating disputes, and seeks to place youth in appropriate social programs. Analysis of the program, which is modeled on similar efforts elsewhere, can help inform other efforts to address urban violence
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2008-2009 report by Terry J Fain( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 101 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program's funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA's success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their ninth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2008-2009 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2007-2008 report by Terry Fain( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2000, the California State Legislature passed what is now known as the Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA). This effort was designed to provide a stable funding source to counties for juvenile programs that have been proven effective in curbing crime among juvenile probationers and young at-risk offenders. The Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), which administers the program's funding, is required to submit annual reports to the legislature measuring JJCPA's success. The legislation identified six specific outcome measures to be included in annual reports from each of the JJCPA programs: (1) successful completion of probation, (2) arrests, (3) probation violations, (4) incarcerations, (5) successful completion of restitution, and (6) successful completion of community service. Each county can also supply supplemental outcomes to measure locally identified service needs. JJCPA programs are now in their fifth year of funding. This report summarizes the fiscal year 2007-2008 findings reported to CSA, as well as additional program information gathered by the Los Angeles County Probation Department, based on its oversight and monitoring of program implementation and outcomes
Effective policing for 21st-century Israel by Jessica M Saunders( Book )

9 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and Hebrew and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We Matched U.S. and Israeli Forces on Predictors of Police Force Size and CompositionComparisons Identified Differences in Policing Approaches; Conclusion; Approaches to Policing in Minority Communities; Minority Policing Needs to Address the Problems of Both Overpolicing and Underpolicing; A Variety of Measures Are Used to Address Minority Policing; Systematic Research Is Lacking Regarding Other Practices; Conclusion; Methods for Implementing Responsive and Effective Policing; Community Policing; Problem-Oriented Policing; Deterrence; Use of Volunteers
Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act( )

in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of racial disparities in the New York Police Department's stop, question, and frisk practices by Greg Ridgeway( )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

89% of pedestrian stops by the New York Police Department involve non-white persons. The Dept. asked that a study be conducted by the RAND Center on Quality Policing (CQP) to help the New York City Police Department understand the issue of the predominance of pedestrian stops and identify recommendations for addressing potential problems
Hidden in plain sight : what cost-of-crime research can tell us about investing in police by Paul Heaton( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Many state and local governments are facing significant fiscal challenges, forcing policymakers to confront difficult trade-offs as they consider how to allocate scarce resources across numerous worthy initiatives. To achieve their policy priorities, it will become increasingly important for policymakers to concentrate resources on programs that can clearly demonstrate that they improve their constituents' quality of life. To identify such programs, cost/benefit analysis can be a powerful tool for objectively adjudicating the merits of particular programs. On the surface, all such programs aim to improve quality of life, but whether they actually achieve -- or will achieve -- what they aim for is another question. Summarizing the existing high-quality academic research on the cost of crime and the effectiveness of police in preventing crime, this paper familiarizes policymakers and practitioners with current research on these issues and demonstrates how this research can be used to better understand the returns to investments in police. It demonstrates a method for comparing the costs of police personnel with the expected benefits generated by those police in terms of reduced crime. Applying the method to several real-world scenarios shows that these investments generate net social benefits. Returns on investments in police personnel are likely to be substantial."--Publisher's website
Case weights for federal defender organizations( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Attorneys working at federal defender organizations (FDOs) represent financially eligible individuals in federal criminal prosecutions and related proceedings, both at the trial court level and on appeal. This report describes a statistically reliable system of case weights, based on the national averages of attorney hours expended in various types of cases, and examines issues related to factors, other than the type of case, that might affect the amount of resources necessary for providing an effective defense. It also asks whether employing case weights makes sense for evaluating and projecting FDO resource needs, what might be the best ways for calculating those weights, and what appeared to be the most-significant limitations on their application in this manner. It presents the main findings regarding a functional case-weighting system for FDOs, discusses the examination of factors that could influence attorney time expenditures, examines issues related to caseload projections, sets forth historical weighted caseload totals for the federal defender system, and makes recommendations for increasing the accuracy and functionality of any future case-weight update
Human trafficking in Ohio : markets, responses, and considerations by Jeremy M Wilson( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human trafficking has garnered a significant and growing amount of attention from the U.S. government since the 1990s, culminating in the passage of the federal Trafficking Victims Protection Act in 2000. There is also a growing body of research on human trafficking, but most of it has focused on trying to show that human trafficking is a problem. Wilson and Dalton explore the extent and characteristics of concrete cases of human trafficking in Columbus and Toledo, Ohio, as well as the awareness of and response to the problem by the justice systems and social service provider communities in the two cities. The authors summarize their content analysis of newspaper accounts as well as key respondent interviews that they conducted with criminal justice officials and social service providers in each site. These identified several cases of juvenile sex trafficking and forced prostitution in Toledo, as well as a smaller trafficking market centered on the forced labor of noncitizens in Columbus. Wilson and Dalton compare the two cities' considerably different responses to human trafficking, and conclude with suggestions on how to raise awareness about human trafficking and improve the responses of the criminal justice system, the juvenile justice system, and social services to the problem
License plate readers for law enforcement : opportunities and obstacles by Keith Gierlack( Book )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Law enforcement agencies across the country have quickly been adopting a new technology to combat auto theft and other crimes: automated license plate reader (LPR) systems. These systems can capture the image of the license plate of a passing vehicle and compare the plate number against official hotlists that show an array of infractions or reasons why it may be of interest to authorities. But because LPR technology is relatively new in the United States, opportunities and obstacles in its use in law enforcement are still under exploration. To examine issues about this technology, RAND conducted interviews with law enforcement officers and others responsible for procuring, maintaining, and operating the systems. Champions of LPR technology exist at many levels, from tech-savvy officers who use it every day, to chiefs who promote it, to other officials and policymakers who believe LPR technology is a significant force multiplier for police departments. Challenges exist, however, to realizing more widespread acceptance and use of the technology. Chief among these are privacy concerns related to the retention and potential misuse of LPR data, technical and bureaucratic impediments to sharing data among law enforcement agencies, and constraints on the availability of staffing and training needed to support LPR systems
 
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Long-term effects of law enforcement's post-9/11 focus on counterterrorism and homeland security
Covers
Long-term effects of law enforcement's post-9/11 focus on counterterrorism and homeland securityCommunity-based violence prevention : an assessment of Pittsburgh's One Vision, One Life ProgramLos Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2008-2009 reportLos Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act : fiscal year 2007-2008 report
Alternative Names
Rand Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment (Organization). Rand Safety and Justice

Rand Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment (Organization). Safety and Justice Program

Safety and Justice Program (Rand Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment (Organization))

Languages
English (69)

Hebrew (3)