WorldCat Identities

Boles, James

Overview
Works: 25 works in 91 publications in 1 language and 1,794 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Case studies  Military history  Diaries  Fiction  Domestic fiction  Historical fiction 
Roles: Narrator, Author
Classifications: BJ1611, 650.12
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about James Boles
 
Most widely held works by James Boles
A terrible glory Custer and the Little Bighorn-- the last great battle of the American West by Jim Donovan( Recording )

8 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In June of 1876, on a desolate hill above a winding river called "the Little Bighorn," George Armstrong Custer and all 210 men under his command were annihilated by almost 2,000 Sioux and Cheyenne. The news caused a public uproar, and those in positions of power promptly began to point fingers in order to avoid responsibility. Custer, who was conveniently dead, took the brunt of the blame. The truth, however, was far more complex. This is the first book to relate the entire story, and the first to call upon all the research and findings of the past 25 years--which have changed significantly how this controversial event is perceived. It is also the first book to bring to light the details of the U.S. Army cover-up--and unravel one of the greatest mysteries in U.S. military history.--From publisher description
American-made the enduring legacy of the WPA : when FDR put the nation to work by Nick Taylor( Recording )

7 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When President Roosevelt took the oath of office in 1933, he was facing a devastated nation. Four years into the Great Depression, 13 million American workers were jobless. What people wanted were jobs, not handouts, and in 1935, after a variety of temporary relief measures, a permanent nationwide jobs program was created--the Works Progress Administration, which would forever change the physical landscape and the social policies of the United States. The WPA lasted for eight years, spent $11 billion, and employed 8 and a half million men and women. The agency combined the urgency of putting people back to work with a vision of physically rebuilding America. Its workers laid roads, erected dams, bridges, tunnels, and airports, but also performed concerts, staged plays, and painted murals. Sixty years later, there is almost no area in America that does not bear some visible mark of its presence.--From publisher description
Twilight at Monticello the final years of Thomas Jefferson by Alan Pell Crawford( Recording )

6 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 202 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Much has been written about Thomas Jefferson, with good reason: His life was a great American drama-one of the greatest-played out in compelling acts. He was the architect of our democracy, a visionary chief executive who expanded this nation's physical boundaries to unimagined lengths. But Twilight at Monticello is something entirely new: an unprecedented and engrossing personal look at the intimate Jefferson in his final years that will change the way audiences think about this true American icon. It was during these years-from his return to Monticello in 1809 after two terms as president until his death in 1826-that Jefferson's idealism would be most severely, and heartbreakingly, tested.Based on new research and documents culled from the Library of Congress, the Virginia Historical Society, and other special collections-including hitherto unexamined letters from family, friends, and Monticello neighbors-Alan Pell Crawford paints an authoritative and deeply moving portrait of Thomas Jefferson as private citizen, the first original depiction of the man in more than a generation.Here, told with grace and masterly detail, is Jefferson with his family at Monticello, dealing with illness and the indignities wrought by early-nineteenth-century medicine; coping with massive debt and the immense costs associated with running a grand residence; navigating public disputes and mediating family squabbles; and receiving dignitaries and correspondingwith close friends, including John Adams, the Marquis de Lafayette, and other heroes from the Revolution. Enmeshed as he was in these affairs during his final years, Jefferson was still a viable political force, advising his son-in-law Thomas Randolph during his terms as Virginia governor, helping the administration of his good friend President James Madison during the ?internal improvements? controversy, and establishing the first wholly secular American institution of higher learning, the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. We also see Jefferson's views on slavery evolve, along with his awareness of the costs to civil harmony exacted by the Founding Fathers' failure to effectively reconcile slaveholding within a republic dedicated to liberty.Right up until his death on the fiftieth anniversary of America's founding, Thomas Jefferson remained an indispensable man, albeit a supremely human one. And it is precisely that figure Crawford introduces to us in the revelatory Twilight at Monticello
Leviathan the history of whaling in America by Eric Jay Dolin( Recording )

8 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The epic history of the "iron men in wooden boats" who built an industrial empire through the pursuit of whales. Environmental writer Dolin chronicles the rise of a burgeoning industry, from its brutal struggles during the Revolutionary period to its golden age in the mid-1800s when a fleet of more than 700 ships hunted the seas and American whale oil lit the world, to its decline as the twentieth century dawned
The whale warriors [the battle at the bottom of the world to save the planet's largest mammals] by Peter Heller( Recording )

11 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 172 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Peter Heller takes us on a hair-raising journey aboard a whale-saving pirate ship with a vigilante crew whose mission is to stop illegal Japanese whaling in the stormy remote seas off Antarctica
A disorder peculiar to the country by Ken Kalfus( )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Joyce and Marshall Harriman are in the midst of a contentious divorce, but still sharing a cramped, overmortgaged Brooklyn apartment with their two children. On the morning of September 11, Joyce departs for Newark to catch a flight to San Francisco, and Marshall, after dropping the kids at daycare, heads for his office in the World Trade Center. She misses her flight and he's late for work, but on that grim day, in devastated city, among millions seized by fear and grief, each thinks the other is dead, and each is secretly, shamefully, gloriously happy. As their bitter divorce is further complicated by anthrax scares, suicide bombs, foreign wars, and the stock market collapse, they suffer, in ways unexpectedly personal and increasingly ludicrous, the many strange ravages of our time. In this astonishing black comedy, Kalfus suggests how our nation's public calamities have encroached upon our most private illusions
Hug your people by Jack Mitchell( Recording )

7 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 129 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explains how to improve customer service by taking care of one's employees, counseling business leaders on the principles of imparting kindness, trust, and pride in a working force to enable greater productivity and loyalty
The master key system by Charles F Haanel( Recording )

5 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What would be possible if you could unlock your entire mental potential? "The Master Key System" is one of the classic works in the "science of thought" tradition. Charles F. Haanel's timeless work has been rediscovered for the benefit of today's listener. Newly updated for the 21st Century, the time-tested wisdom of Haanel's system reveals techniques to unlock thought as a creative energy and power
Tulia race, cocaine, and corruption in a small Texas town by Nate Blakeslee( Recording )

5 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 113 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Early one morning in the summer of 1999 authorities in the tiny west Texas town of Tulia began a roundup of suspected drug dealers. By the time the sweep was done, over forty people had been arrested and one of every five black adults in town was behind bars, all accused of dealing cocaine to the same undercover officer, Tom Coleman. Coleman, the son of a well-known Texas Ranger, was named Officer of the Year in Texas. Not until after the trials--in which Coleman's uncorroborated testimony secured sentences as long as 361 years--did it become apparent that Tom Coleman was not the man he claimed to be. Tulia is the story of this town, the bust, the trials, and the heroic legal battle to reverse the convictions that caught the attention of the nation in the spring of 2003. With a sure sense of history and of place, a great feel for the characters involved, and showdowns inside the courtroom and out. Blakeslee's Tulia is contemporary journalism at its finest, and a thrilling read. The scandal changed the way narcotics enforcement is done in Texas, and has put the national drug war on trial at a time when incarceration rates in this country have never been higher. But the story is much bigger than the tale of just one bust. As Tulia makes clear, these events are the latest chapter in a story with themes as old as the country itself. It is a marvelously well-told tale about injustice, race, poverty, hysteria, desperation, and doing the right thing in America"--Publisher's web site
Puppy's first steps the whole-dog approach to raising a happy, healthy, well-behaved puppy( Recording )

6 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A comprehensive, accessible, and humane guide to puppies from one of the world's premier veterinary schools. This whole-dog approach--a unique combination of training, behavior, and health care--is based on cutting-edge research and real day-to-day clinical experience. The faculty of the Tufts University Cummings School, led by the renowned animal behaviorist Nicholas Dodman, provides information on the health and behavior of puppie, covering everything from how to pick a puppy, what to feed him, and how to housetrain, to why puppies behave the way they do and what to do in a host of medical situations.--From publisher description
1967 Israel, the war, and the year that transformed the Middle East by Tom Segev( Recording )

9 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Israeli historian examines a watershed year in the history of the Middle East, detailing the apocalyptic atmosphere in which Israel existed, the six-day 1967 war, and the implications of the war in terms of reshaping the the Middle East
Hug your people the proven way to hire, inspire, and recognize your employees to achieve remarkable results by Jack Mitchell( Recording )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explains how to improve customer service by taking care of one's employees, counseling business leaders on the principles of imparting kindness, trust, and pride in a working force to enable greater productivity and loyalty
The science of getting rich by W. D Wattles( Recording )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This revised edition presents a modern version of the lessons taught in the original. Free of complicated theories and wordy philosophies, it is told in a clear-cut, easy-to-understand manner that all can comprehend and apply to their lives. It requires only that you listen, internalize the words, and keep your thoughts on your desires. You will then obtain the wealth that is awaiting everyone"--Container
Proust was a neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A dazzling intellectual inquiry into the nature of truth and the relationship between art and science. In this technology-driven age, it₂s tempting to believe that science can solve every mystery. After all, science has cured countless diseases and even sent humans into space. But as Jonah Lehrer argues in this sparkling and original book, science is not the only path to knowledge. In fact, when it comes to understanding the brain, art got there first. Taking a group of artists-a painter, a poet, a chef, a composer and a handful of novelists-Lehrer shows how each one discovered an essential truth about the human mind that science is only now rediscovering. We learn, for example, how Proust first revealed the fallibility of memory; how George Eliot discovered the brain's malleability: how the French chef Escoffier discovered umami (the fifth taste); how Cezanne worked out the subtleties of vision; and how Gertrude Stein exposed the deep structure of language-a full half-century before Chomsky. It's the ultimate tale of art trumping science. An ingenious blend of biography, criticism, and first rate science writing, Proust Was a Neuroscientist urges science to listen more closely to art, for the willing mind can combine the best of both to brilliant effect
The new science of getting rich revised for the 21st century by W. D Wattles( Recording )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Canadian Plastics Institute feasibility study by James Boles( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A terrible glory by James Donovan( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In June 1876, on a desolate hill above a winding river called "the Little Bighorn," George Armstrong Custer and all 210 men under his direct command were annihilated by almost 2,000 Sioux and Cheyenne. The news of this devastating loss caused a public uproar, and those in positions of power promptly began to point fingers in order to avoid responsibility. Custer, who was conveniently dead, took the brunt of the blame.The truth, however, is far more complex. A Terrible Glory is the first book to relate the entire story of this endlessly fascinating battle and the first to call upon all the pertinent research and findings of the past twenty-five years-which have significantly changed how this controversial event is perceived. Furthermore, it is the first book to bring to light the details of the U.S. Army cover-up and unravel one of the greatest mysteries in U.S. military history.Scrupulously researched, A Terrible Glory will stand as a landmark work. Brimming with authentic detail and an unforgettable cast of characters-from Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse to Ulysses Grant and Custer himself-this is history with the sweep of a great novel
Puppy's first steps: raising a happy, healthy, well-behaved dog by James Boles( Recording )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Synthesis, characterization, and redox properties of copper(II) complexes with derivatized cyclam-like ligands by James Boles( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Role of Faculty as a Knowledge Broker by William A Weeks( )

1 edition published in 2014 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study examines the perceptions of students, recruiters, and faculty regarding the importance of various workplace attributes to students who are entering the job market. Furthermore, this study discusses the important role that faculty can play as a knowledge broker with both students and recruiters. Looking at students’ Top 10 attributes, we found there is a significant difference between students and faculty perceptions for (1) job satisfaction, (2) company culture, (3) company’s employee treatment, (4) training program, (5) company growth potential, and (6) company financial stability. In each case, the faculty underestimated the importance of these attributes to the students. Regarding (1) fit with goals and (2) current organization employees are satisfied/loyalty, both faculty and recruiters significantly underestimated the attributes’ importance to the students. Results indicate recruiters are more accurate with respect to what students look for in a job than are faculty. This study also begins some initial exploratory work on developing factors for the items used within this study. Specifically, the three samples were combined and exploratory factor analysis was conducted, resulting in a five-factor solution. Furthermore, this study provides faculty with a better understanding of what student job applicants are looking for in a job and also gives suggestions for helping the faculty become better able to serve as knowledge brokers between recruiters and students
 
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A terrible glory Custer and the Little Bighorn-- the last great battle of the American West
Languages
English (87)

Covers
American-made the enduring legacy of the WPA : when FDR put the nation to workTwilight at Monticello the final years of Thomas JeffersonLeviathan the history of whaling in AmericaThe whale warriors [the battle at the bottom of the world to save the planet's largest mammals]A disorder peculiar to the countryHug your peopleThe master key systemTulia race, cocaine, and corruption in a small Texas town