WorldCat Identities

Rickard, Paul M.

Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Paul M Rickard
 
Most widely held works by Paul M Rickard
Aboriginal architecture, living architecture( Visual )

13 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aboriginal architecture living architecture offers a fascinating in-depth look into the diversity of North American Native architecture. Featuring expert commentary and stunning imagery, this program provides a virtual tour of seven aboriginal communities-- Pueblo, Mohawk, Inuite, Crow, Navajo, Coast Salish, and Haida-- revealing how each is actively reinterpreting and adapting traditional forms for contemporary purposes. Everyone is familiar with certain types of Aboriginal architecture. Traditional igloos and teepees are two of the most enduring symbols of North America itself. But how much do we really know about the types of structures Native Peoples designed, engineered, and built? For more than three hundred years, Native communities in North America have had virtually no indigenous architecture. Communities have made do with low cost government housing and community projects designed by strangers in far-away places. Thankfully, across the continent, political, financial, and cultural changes have created a renaissance of Native design. Mordern Aboriginal architects are turning to ancient forms, adapting them in response to changes in the natural and social environment, and creating contemporary structures that hearken to the past. Employing old and new materials and techniques, and with an emphasis on harmony and balance, Native designers are successfully melding current community needs with tradition. The resulting buildings are testaments to the enduring strength and ingenuity of Aboriginal design
Okimah( Visual )

8 editions published between 1998 and 2018 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since time immemorial, the goose hunt has been of central importance to the Cree people of the James Bay coastal areas. The hunt is not only a source of food for the people, but it also plays an increasingly important role in the transmission of Cree culture, skills and ethics. Filmmaker Paul M. Rickard takes us along with his family on a fall goose hunt in the surrounding areas of Moose River in northern Ontario. The Okimah are the hunting leaders whose life experiences and observations as hunters enable them to teach customary rules for exploiting the resource base. We see how these hunting excursions are not only about harvesting but about the need to respect the land and the animals, and the transmission of the Okimah's knowledge from one generation to the next
To Brooklyn and back : a Mohawk journey( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For over 50 years, the Kahnawake Mohawks of Quebec, Canada, occupied a 10-square-block hub in the North Gowanus section of Brooklyn, which became known as Little Caughnawaga. The men, skilled ironworkers, came to New York in search of work and brought their wives, children and often, extended family with them. This film is the personal story of Mohawk filmmaker Reaghan Tarbell from Kahnawake, Quebec as she explores her roots and traces the connections of her family to the once legendary Mohawk community through the stories of the women who lived there
Little Caughnawaga : To Brooklyn and Back( Visual )

2 editions published between 2008 and 2015 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Little Caughnawaga: To Brooklyn and Back is an hour-long documentary about the personal story of Mohawk filmmaker Reaghan Tarbell from Kahnawake, Quebec, as she explores her roots and traces the connections of her family to the Mohawk community in Brooklyn, New York. For over 50 years, the Kahnawake Mohawks, of Quebec, Canada occupied a 10 square block area in the North Gowanus section of Brooklyn, which became known as Little Caughnawaga. The men, skilled ironworkers, came to New York in search of work and brought their wives, children and often, extended family with them. The story of the Mohawk ironworkers is an important one and is one that has been told and continues to be told through documentaries, newspaper and magazine articles. Yet the stories of Kahnawake Mohawk women who lived in Brooklyn have gone untold."--Mushkeg Media Inc. Website
Little Caughnawaga : to Brooklyn and back = Le petit Caughnawaga = Nikanatá:'a Caughnawaga Tsi niió:re ne Brooklyn Taióterahte( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Documentaire. "Tandis que les monteurs de hautes charpentes métalliques mohawks assemblaient les gratte-ciel emblématiques de Manhattan, leurs femmes, elles, gardaient les pieds sur terre et assuraient le maintien d'une communauté pleine de vitalité au cœur même de Brooklyn. Dans son documentaire, la cinéaste Reaghan Tarbell évoque les beaux jours de cette collectivité, entre les années 1920 et 1960, et rend hommage à la résilience de ses compatriotes mohawks"--[Conteneur]
Finding my talk : a journey into aboriginal languages( Visual )

7 editions published between 2000 and 2009 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Filmmaker Paul M. Rickard investigates his Native American language roots by visiting with those who speak the Tlingit language in the Yukon, Mohawk language in Quebec and the Inuktitut language in Iqaluit
Le petit Caughnawaga( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dans ce long métrage documentaire, la cinéaste Reaghan Tarbell part à la découverte de ses racines en retraçant l'histoire de la communauté mohawk de Brooklyn (New York). Du début du XXe siècle aux années 1960, les Mohawks de Kahnawake, au Québec, ont participé sans interruption à la construction des gratte-ciels de la métropole américaine. Plusieurs s'y sont établis, créant une sous-culture autochtone citadine au cœur de Brooklyn. La cinéaste leur rend hommage
Kanien'kehá:ka : living the language( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two part documentary about the personal, thought provoking and honest stories of the Mohawk language (Kanien'kehá:ka) immersion program in Akwesasne. It examines various aspects of what it takes to learn and maintain a language through immersion by addressing key concepts of tradition, traditional education and identity preservation. In the late 1970's, the Mohawk community of Akwesasne began a dynamic language revitalization movement. The establishment of Mohawk language immersion programs and the creation of the Akwesasne Freedom School were just two of the major aspects of the movement. "One cannot be traditional without knowing and speaking Kanien'kehá:ka (the Mohawk language)" is often heard at the school. Parents and elders operate the Freedom School by a consensus decision-making process with financial support primarily from annual quilt sales and potluck dinners
Finding our talk = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

6 editions published between 2001 and 2020 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Surveys the state of aboriginal languages in different areas of Canada
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tells the story of Dave Elliott, a Saanich fisherman who almost singlehandly resurrected Sencofen, the dying language of his people, by creating an alphabet system. His work has been carried on by his son John and daughter Linda. The Saanich school has developed a language curriculum that includes using digital technology to record the elders and teach the children
Finding our talk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Every fourteen days a language dies. The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Fortunately there are unique individuals and organizations across the country who are aiming to beat the odds. Not only are they using innovative strategies to maintain the basic functions of their languages, they are finding entertaining ways to prreserve their creative and cognitive spirit as well
Finding our talk( Visual )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are disappearing. Others are threatened. The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Finding Our Talk One examines the state of Aboriginal languages within Canada and celebrates the many individuals, communities and organizations that are reclaiming their language, culture, stories and often, their very existence as a people
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Traces the history of the very successful Cree Language Immersion Program, developed and implemented in schools in the Cree communities of Northern Quebec. Annie Whiskeychan is featured for her early efforts to teach the children the Cree language
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looks at the historical roots of the demise of the Huron/Wyandot language and at the present day efforts to re-kindle it in spoken form by Michel Gros Louis and François Vincent. It also explores the cultural significance and implications of language as ceremonial artifact. Featured are language keepers Father Prospèr Vincent, Margaret Vincent and Frank Nataway
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses the history and development of writing systems among Canada's native cultures and the contemporary applications of the Cree syllabary with adaptations for different languages. Jose A. Kusugak discusses the adaptations to Inuktitut
Finding our talk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Many Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are disappearing. Others are threatened. ... The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Fortunately, there are unique individuals and organizations across [Canada] who are ... using innovative strategies to maintain the basic functions of their languages [and] finding entertaining ways to preserve their creative and cognitive spirit as well. This series ... celebrates their successes and survey[s] the state of Aboriginal languages in different areas of Canada"--Container
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The story of the legendary Mohawk ironworkers and of the new approaches to language instruction for both adults and children within the contemporary community of Kahnawake. Dorothy Lazore, Mohawk Indian, is featured for her efforts to maintain the aborginal languages of Canada
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focuses on the Métis of Manitoba who are working politically and through the education system, to have Michif recognized as the official language of the Métis. Features Rita Flamand, an active teacher of Michif, and Ida Rose Allard, who wrote the first books for teaching the Michif language
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his home community of Maliotenam, performer Florent Vollant uses a musical campaign to inspire Innu youth with the passion and concern he feels for the Innu language
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

George and Maggie Wabanonick take a group of teens to the woods to initiate them in their traditional culture and language. In the classroom, the kids and teachers struggle with their Algonquin lessons, while the pop group Anishnabe gives the language new life. William Commanda is featured as a language keeper
 
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Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.43 for Aboriginal ... to 0.67 for Finding ou ...)

Languages
English (54)

French (1)