WorldCat Identities

Jenkins, James Lineberry 1919-2003

Overview
Works: 9 works in 9 publications in 1 language and 69 library holdings
Genres: Patents  Interviews  Oral histories 
Roles: Interviewer, Author
Classifications: TS271, 671.84
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about James Lineberry Jenkins
 
Most widely held works by James Lineberry Jenkins
Old West barb wire and fence tool handbook by James Lineberry Jenkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1967 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Charlotte observer July 21-26, 1958 by James Lineberry Jenkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1958 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trouble at UNC : problems cloud its image( Book )

1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Oral history interview with William W. Finlator, April 19, 1985 : interview C-0007, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by William Wallace Finlator( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Longtime civil rights advocate Reverend William W. Finlator speaks powerfully about decades of activism and the future of rights in America. Finlator's activism was wide-ranging: he marched for integration in the 1950s and 1960s, joined vigils protesting capital punishment in North Carolina, and advocated for the rights of migrant workers. During a life of activism, he developed strong opinions about capital punishment, racism, the neglect of the poor, and what he saw as the pernicious influence of religion over politics. His most passionate language, however, is devoted to the defense of working people
Oral history interview with William Dallas Herring, February 14, 1987 : interview C-0034, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by William Dallas Herring( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

William Dallas Herring began his career in education politics on the Duplin County School Board and eventually became chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education. In Duplin County and statewide, Herring sought to consolidate school districts and give as much control as possible to local decision-makers. His devotion to comprehensive education (as opposed to choosing to support either vocational or liberal arts education) sometimes put him at odds with other Board members and state leaders. In this interview, Herring describes some of these conflicts, offering broad pronouncements about education and the details of policy wrangling. Many of these details come in Herring's recollections about the growth of the community college system in North Carolina in the late 1950s and 1960s. Researchers should read this interview with its partner, C-0035
Oral history interview with Robert Giles, September 10, 1987 : interview C-0063, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Robert E Giles( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Robert Giles discusses the public and political reaction to the Supreme Court's Brown ruling, explaining the heavy pressure the Brown order placed on North Carolina politicians, who hoped to prevent alienating the white population. Giles asserts that state politicians adopted a moderate stance and moderate policies which yielded minimal racial desegregation. The Pupil Assignment Act of 1955 and the Pearsall Plan, he says, assuaged whites fears by keeping the public schools open and projecting the perception that the public controlled school assignments. He lauds the effectiveness of the gubernatorial leadership of William Umstead and Luther Hodges in the early to mid-1950s. Giles also touches on segregationist I. Beverly Lake, who attempted to stoke racial tensions and drum up support for his personal political ambitions
Oral history interview with Edward L. Rankin, August 20, 1987 : interview C-0044, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by Edward L Rankin( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1948, Edward L. Rankin left his job as a journalist in order to work as William Umstead's press assistant during the latter's gubernatorial campaign. Umstead was not elected in 1948, but when he chose to run again in 1952, Rankin eagerly joined him on the campaign trail and became Umstead's private secretary after his election that year. Rankin describes his perception of Umstead as a personal friend and as a political figure, his struggle with illness, and his death in 1954. Rankin focuses on Umstead's reaction to the Brown v. Board of Education decision, handed down just prior to his untimely demise. According to Rankin, Umstead took care to understand the meaning of the decision and its potential ramifications for the South before working to establish a citizen's group headed by Tom Pearsall. Although Umstead believed that Brown was a mistake on the part of the Supreme Court, he was determined that North Carolina would abide by the Court's decree. Following Umstead's death, Rankin stayed on as private secretary to Umstead's successor, Luther Hodges. According to Rankin, although Hodges and Umstead had not had the most congenial personal relationship, Hodges was determined to maintain Umstead's approach to the issue of school desegregation. Rankin describes in detail the activities of the Pearsall group, the spectrum of responses to the Brown decision and the Pearsall Plan (1956), and efforts to challenge its implementation. He discusses the leadership roles of such individuals as Governor Hodges, Tom Pearsall, lawyer Paul Johnston, and state superintendent Charlie Carroll. Rankin's recollection of this tumultuous time in North Carolina history draws attention to the role of political leaders in mediating a potentially explosive political minefield
Oral history interview with William Dallas Herring, May 16, 1987 : interview C-0035, Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) by William Dallas Herring( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

William Dallas Herring, longtime chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education, discusses some of the issues he encountered during his tenure. He speaks in detail about education issues at the time of the interview, and offers his opinions on the state of democracy in the United States. Herring believes strongly in representative democracy, and worries that institutions across the country and in the state are falling prey to complacency, entrenched incumbency, and flawed processes. On a more granular level, Herring shares his opinion on proposed changes to the election of superintendent of education; evaluation of teacher performance; and curricula. Researchers interested in the details of these issues should read this interview in its entirety
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.36 (from 0.28 for Old West b ... to 0.73 for James Line ...)

Alternative Names
Jenkins, Jay, 1919-2003

Languages