WorldCat Identities

Ohio State University Department of Theatre

Overview
Works: 105 works in 147 publications in 1 language and 156 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Biography  Popular works 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ohio State University
The Aristotelian structure of the Kydian revenge tragedy formula by Jeffrey Alan Schwamberger( )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gavottes and bouquets: a comparative study of changes in dance style between 1700 and 1850 by Mary-Jane Evans Warner( )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The constant wife, by W. Somerset Maugham by Hubert P Morehead( )

2 editions published in 1946 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This is what it is to be human" : the drama and history of Charles L. Mee Jr. by Jennifer Elissa Schlueter( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In his career, Charles L. Mee, Jr. (1938- ) has moved between the fields of history and theatre. Between 1960 and 1965, Mee participated in the Off Off Broadway movement as a playwright and a journalist. From 1966 to 1999, Mee wrote nineteen books: two memoirs, three children's books, and fourteen histories. In 1986, Mee returned to playwriting, with his Obie-award-winning Vienna: Lusthaus. The plays Mee created after 1986 are heavily influenced by his career as a historian. His plays have taken historical events as their topic. In addition, Mee creates his scripts as collages, sampling from a variety of literary and popular texts. Further, several of Mee's plays are rewrites of other texts, including Caucasian Chalk Circle, Orestes, and The Trojan Women. Mee claims "there is no such thing as an original play," and thus views all texts as part of a collective culture from which he may sample. Via his website, he then returns his work, copyright-free, to the culture for further use. Mee's battle with polio (which he contracted in 1953) has also shaped his aesthetic view. Describing himself in his memoirs as "nearly normal," Mee finds the shattering destructiveness of his disease to have been creative. Drawn to making theatre that reflects his experience of fragmentation, Mee takes the works of Dadaist Max Ernst and Pop Artist Robert Rauschenberg as further inspiration. Mee's battle with polio (which he contracted in 1953) has also shaped his aesthetic view. Describing himself in his memoirs as "nearly normal," Mee finds the shattering destructiveness of his disease to have been creative. Drawn to making theatre that reflects his experience of fragmentation, Mee takes the works of Dadaist Max Ernst and Pop Artist Robert Rauschenberg as further inspiration
John Osborne's Look back in anger, as it reflected postwar frustrations in Britain by Diane Elizabeth Glatt( )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The "Immersion Technique" in the Theatre of Antonio Buero Vallejo : the Expression of Theme Through Scenographic Innovation and Experimentation by John B Connor( )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The path to creation : She, an origional production by Allyson Laura Rosen( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following is the documentation of my process as an actor-creator in the creation of my thesis project, she. This process has been a journey of discoveries: as a result of my personal, artistic, and academic connections to folklore and modern experimental theatre, I discovered that I wanted to create an experimental theatre piece that engages the audience beyond a voyeuristic level, using mythology and folklore to explore universal connections that human beings have to one another. Chapter One is an overview of the research for the project. Chapter Two discusses the creation of the script for she, and also includes a final draft of the script. In Chapter Three, I describe the production circumstances for the project. Chapter Four is a record of the rehearsal process, and the scored script is also included. In Chapter Five, I discuss discoveries made during the performance of she, and provide an evaluation of the entire process
Russet Mantle by Lynn Riggs by William John Russell( )

2 editions published in 1946 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elizabethan acting companies, 1588-1594 : received narratives and historiographic problems by Terence Schoone-Jongen( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the last century, the major studies of Elizabethan acting companies have all tended to operate under a variety of problematic assumptions. These assumptions are particularly evident in E. K. Chambers and W. W. Greg's "amalgamation" hypothesis (which states that from 1590 to 1594 the Lord Strange's and Admiral's Men were joined as one company) and the various accounts of Pembroke's Men. In this work, I have sought to mobilize all available evidence in an attempt to reconsider the received narratives about these companies, as well as the assumptions present in those received narratives. In the case of the "amalgamation," a close study of the evidence reveals that there is little or no support for such a hypothesis, save that the hypothesis, if true, would support a number of traditional assumptions about provincial touring and acting company size. In fact, the surviving evidence actually appears to directly contradict the possibility of an "amalgamated" company. To date, the most thorough critique of the "amalgamation" hypothesis is Andrew Gurr's "The Chimera of Amalgamation," but here too several questionable assumptions are at work. I have identified some of these assumptions; I have also brought to bear other evidence and several considerations which Gurr's argument does not deal with. The histories that have been written about Pembroke's Men present a slightly different problem. Here, there is concrete evidence that such a company existed, but that evidence has been interpreted in many different ways. I have examined the various histories of Pembroke's Men and pointed out the many assumptions that operate in each of these accounts. In identifying these assumptions, it becomes clear that, while scholars have become more and more sophisticated in their use of evidence, they have not become any more careful about their employment of assumptions. As a final component of this study, I have, based on the available evidence, compiled detailed itineraries for the acting companies active between 1584 and 1599
Performing latinidad : hegemonic processes, Latina/o tensions, and the theatre of Caridad Svich by Lise Jan Evans( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis begins a complicated and detailed introduction to the term latinidad as a way to illuminate, analyze, and address issues that involve people of Latin American and Caribbean descent who now live in the United States---that is, Latinos/as. It then shows how theatre, and one play in particular, demonstrate this term, and why it is useful. Speaking of Latinos/as as one group is an uneasy enterprise, as they are of many races and classes, come from a multitude of countries, and have a multitude of languages, cultures, and religions. Attempting to articulate what this group is, who they are, whether historically, presently, or potentially, is an articulation of latinidad. These articulations can exist in all forms of human behavior, whether everyday action and conversation, or formal, public performance. The specific racism that Latinos/as face in the United States can be described as one type of latinidad. Conflicts between Latinos/as and non-Latinos/as, and conflicts between Latinos/as are all instances of latinidad. Actions of resistance, division, affirmation, support, solidarity, and compromise by Latino/as are also instances of latinidad. Theatre is an excellent venue in which to demonstrate and discuss latinidad. Theatre is representational, providing embodied possibility for audiences to watch and experience, and presentational, providing ideas and opinions with which audiences may consider, agree, and disagree. Theatre also requires conflict and multiple perspectives in order to portray dramatic action. Thus, latinidad, in all its complexity and different forms, can be well served by theatre. One play that deals with latinidad, as a complex set of ideas and events, is Prodigal Kiss by Caridad Svich. The play portrays the process of ceasing to be Latin American and becoming Latino/a in the United States. Through character dilemmas, conflicts, and actions, audiences see many different aspects of and arguments on latinidad that they may identify, agree and sympathize with, or disagree with and reject. Through the representation and presentation of latinidad, audience members and theatre practicioners, both Latino/a and non-Latino/a can leave theatrical productions with new questions, ideas, and possibilities for their own lives
K-nowhere to run, no-w-here to hide : a search for innocence by Kenderick Hardy( )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

My thesis project consists of creating original theatrical combinations primarily between Spoken Word Poetry and Jazz music. I am seeking to create unique physical interfaces between an actor, a poet and a musician in order to give birth to a new genre--Spoken Word Poetry Theatre. This style invites vocalist and musicians to engage in a personal way to assist the impact of words. Spoken Word Poetry is a form of Oral Tradition, a spoken format of passing down culture and heritage from generation to generation. Technically, the Spoken Word is a renovated form of "Old School Poetry" that relies on a rhythmic structure, and the manipulation of the rate and duration of the performer speaking. The delivery and execution depends intimately on call and response with the audience. With "good chemistry" and mastery of communication, the performers and audience can experience a climatic celebratory communion
Infecting the inanimate : puppet theatre responds to AIDS by Jennifer Kathleen Stoessner( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the early 1980s, the world became aware of a new pandemic, AIDS. As feelings of horror and fright captured the minds of many people, artists tried to address the issues underneath them. Theatrical performance became a prevalent way to express the frustration and despair about HIV/AIDS, and puppet theatre, in particular, has made a contribution to the discourse. I investigate how puppetry artists have addressed the illness by examining three case studies, each with a different relationship to the virus and a different target audience. The first case is that of an infected artist, Robert Anton, who performed for a very select few. Although his illness was not manifest in his performance, the themes he explored are similar to the themes explored by other artists infected with HIV. The second case center on Ronnie Burkett's marionette play, Street of Blood, constructed around the AIDS crisis. It was seen internationally from 1998 until its retirement in 2002 and received a great deal of critical attention. I further examine how Street of Blood is part of a spectrum of AIDS related plays. The final case involves the use of puppetry to educate a mass audience about the disease, particularly through the television program, Takalani Sesame. AIDS in South Africa is a fact of life for the children of that nation and acceptance and understanding is part of the mission of Takalani Sesame and its producing organization, Sesame Workshop. It is my contention that the puppet form lends another layer of meaning with it's ability to distance itself from the bounds of human form. The combination of the distance with the topic of frailty and disease makes for very effective explorations of HIV/AIDS
An introductory survey of the plays, novels, and stories of Tawfiq al-Hakim, as translated into English by Christina M Sidebottom( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis will provide an introductory survey of the plays, novels, short stories and other writing of Tawfiq al-Hakim, which have been translated into English. This work will be useful to English-speaking readers who are interested in learning more about Tawfiq al-Hakim and his literary works. The study will include a brief biography of al-Hakim together with an overview of the political regimes, geographical conditions, and the socioeconomic environment that had an impact on the various phases of al-Hakim's life. An analysis of examples of significant publications spanning al-Hakim's writing career will be undertaken. The main focus of this thesis will be an discussion of the play Fate of a Cockroach, in particular Act One which could be read as a political allegory for the life and times of Gamal Abdul Nasir, the military conflicts during his political regime, and the rise and fall of the United Arab Republic (1958-1961). The discussion will include a synopsis of the play, a description of the characters, and a literary analysis of the play, explaining the political allegory
Costume design and production for Trojan Women 2.0, by Charles Mee by Lindsay Amber Simon( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to document the costume design and production process for Trojan Women 2.0 for The Ohio State University Department of Theatre's 2007-2008 season. Written by Charles Mee and co-directed by Maureen Ryan and Jeanine Thompson, the production ran November 1st through November 17th 2007 at The Ohio State University in the Roy Bowen Theatre
Documentary theatre : dramatizing history and historicizing drama by Franklin James Lasik( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past decade, reality television has become one of the most popular television genres. Documentary theatre occupies a similar niche within this viewer climate. Composed principally of primary source information, documentary theatre claims to possess more historical validity than other forms of historical drama, which employs original dialogue and allows more flexibility with chronological order with the aim of heightening the dramatic tension. The purpose of this thesis is to explore whether documentary theatre functions as history, or if it surrenders that validity by virtue of it being in a dramatic rather than a scholarly form. By focusing on how the genre appropriates the methodologies and techniques in the creation and execution of history and drama, the tensions that give documentary dramas power beyond that of tragedy are revealed. Dramatists such as Moisés Kaufman, Anna Deavere Smith and Emily Mann make use of several techniques employed by historians, from a sensitive gathering of primary source material, contextualizing the information within a certain frame, and constructing a thorough narrative of an event. However, they are dramatists by trade, and as such are interested not in creating historical documents but viable stage plays. Thus, their docudramas also make use of dramatic techniques, particularly those of tragedy. The documentary theatre, then, functions both as drama and history, and the interplay of those two forces
"Victorious in mourning weeds" : a study of William Shakespeare's The most lamentable Roman tragedy of Titus Andronicus by Daniel Ervinn Scuro( )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Costume design and production for Much ado about nothing, by William Shakespeare by Crystal Grace Herman( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this paper is to document the costume design and costume production process for William Shakespeare's play Much Ado About Nothing, as produced by The Ohio State University Theatre Department. The play will be produced in The Ohio State University Theatre Department's Thurber Theatre, February 21-March 1, 2008
The scenic and lighting design of the Ohio State University Theatre Department production of Lavonne Mueller's Little victories by Paul Abbatepaolo( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hidden voices : a creation through collaboration with fellow MFA actors and community partner Turning Point, Outreach & engagement Working portfolio by Blair Wing( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The distaff side by John van Druten by Eleanor Ruby Baum( )

2 editions published in 1947 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityOhio State University

Ohio state university

Ohio state university Columbus, USA Department of theatre

Ohio State University. Dept. of Theatre

Languages
English (53)