WorldCat Identities

Granada Manchester (Firm)

Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Granada Manchester (Firm)
Secrets of the Civil War : the stories of lost battles and covert missions finally revealed by A & E Home Video (Firm)( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 290 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Even today, almost 150 years after Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House, unexpected secrets and little-known stories continue to emerge from Civil War history. In the cavalry charge at Mine Creek in Kansas, it took only 30 minutes for 2,800 Union troops to defeat an enemy force more than double in size, and yet, few people have heard of it. The same can be said of a Confederate raid on Vermont and an attempt by Union coal miners to blow up a Southern fort by tunneling underneath it
Battlefield detectives. Battle of Monmouth( Visual )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 241 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Monmouth took place on June 28th 1778 in rural New Jersey. It was a key moment in the Revolutionary War between Great Britain and her thirteen rebellious colonies, and was the last major battle of the Revolution in the North. The battle occurred as the British General Henry Clinton was withdrawing his army from Philadelphia to New York. General George Washington set out in pursuit from his winter headquarters at Valley Forge. Outside the village of Freehold the Americans attacked the rear of the British column. The British assumed that the American Army was weak, ill-disciplined and incapable of facing up to the seasoned British regulars, thought to be the best fighting force the world had ever seen. But at Monmouth things turned out differently. Washington used his artillery so effectively that the British were pinned down and took significant casualties. Cowed by deadly American firepower the British left the field in disarray, their dead unburied. Under cover of darkness they marched wearily on towards New York and avoided a second day of fighting. We'll analyze the conditions at Monmouth, and discover exactly how and why the Americans came to hold their ground."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives. Battle of Cowpens( Visual )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 240 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Cowpens was one of the most critical battles of the American Revolution. It was a signpost and it pointed directly to Yorktown where the British would finally surrender less than a year later. The Battle took place on January 17th 1781 in South Carolina. An American force led by a brilliant Revolutionary War commander called Daniel Morgan routed a British army under the command of an imperious and greatly feared young cavalry colonel called Banastre Tarleton. Tarleton, known as "Bloody Ban", was the most hated British officer in the south because of his ruthless tactics. His force was made up of seasoned British and loyalist regular troops. Morgan's professional army was small. He had to rely heavily on part-time militia troops who had a reputation for running away at the first sight of British redcoats wielding bayonets. Now historians, soil scientists, tacticians, psychologists, geographers and weapons experts have combined their disciplines to analyze this important clash between American Patriots and King George's men. Through their efforts we discover how and why Morgan's amateurs managed to totally destroy a force belonging to the world's best trained and most feared Army."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives( Visual )

3 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 219 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Oriskany was a massacre. Four hundred Patriot militiamen out of a force of eight hundred died for the loss of less than eighty Loyalists, making it the bloodiest battle of the Revolutionary War. Most surprisingly, the ambushers were mainly warriors of the Seneca and Mohawk nations fighting with the British and armed with tomahawks, knives and war clubs. In this revealing episode, Battlefield Detectives analyzes the evidence, dramatically re-enacts the engagement, and discovers what made the battle so bloody and why so many militiamen had to die. Scholars and historians explain the little known story of American Indian involvement in the Revolutionary War."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives. Shiloh( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"One of the great routs, indeed one of the great shocks, of the Civil War was the Confederate defeat at Shiloh. They had chosen the battlefield; they had chosen the moment to attack; and they achieved almost total strategic and tactical surprise. Twelve hours after their surprise attack they were in a commanding position, but the next day they withdrew in disarray. For nearly 150 years Confederate failure has been blamed on the fact that they lost valuable time at the Hornet's Nest, where a detachment of Union soldiers held the line. But through forensic history Battlefield Detectives uncovers a very different story of why things went so badly for the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh."--Publisher's web site
The Six-Day War( Visual )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On June 5, 1967, Israel launched the most successful preemptive air strike in military history against its Egyptian neighbor. Within a few hours, virtually the entire Egyptian Air Force lay in smoldering wreckage. Fighting on three fronts against the combined might of five different armies, Israel secured a stunning victory in a mere six days. How did this small territory manage to overcome an enemy that had twice as many soldiers, three times as many tanks, and four times as many airplanes? Featuring firsthand testimonies from combatants and military planners, as well as key figures in the intelligence world, this program offers insight into the meticulous preparations the Israeli military undertook in the years leading up to the infamous strike
The battle of Big Hole( Visual )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Unlike other Indian Wars in the late 1800's, the Nez Perce War involved two very different groups with very different outlooks on land rights, civilian authority, government powers, social organization, and the responsibilities of the individuals to society. In early August, the non-treaty Nez Perce camped for several days along the North Fork of the Big Hole River. They knew they had crossed into Montana Territory, and believed they were safe from further pursuit. Just before daybreak on August 9, 1877, military forces attacked them as they rested after six weeks of conflict and flight. The Battle of the Big Hole lasted less than 36 hours, yet casualties were dreadfully high. Between 60 and 90 Nez Perce men, and children were killed, most in the initial attack on the sleeping camp. Twenty-two soldiers, a vivilian guide, five civilian volunteers were killed and 39 more were severely wounded."--Container
Battlefield detectives : American Revolution : Battle of Monmouth( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Monmouth took place on June 28th 1778 in rural New Jersey. It was a key moment in the Revolutionary War between Great Britain and her thirteen rebellious colonies, and was the last major battle of the Revolution in the North. The battle occurred as the British General Henry Clinton was withdrawing his army from Philadelphia to New York. General George Washington set out in pursuit from his winter headquarters at Valley Forge. Outside the village of Freehold the Americans attacked the rear of the British column. The British assumed that the American Army was weak, ill-disciplined and incapable of facing up to the seasoned British regulars, thought to be the best fighting force the world had ever seen. But at Monmouth things turned out differently. Washington used his artillery so effectively that the British were pinned down and took significant casualties. Cowed by deadly American firepower the British left the field in disarray, their dead unburied. Under cover of darkness they marched wearily on towards New York and avoided a second day of fighting. We'll analyze the conditions at Monmouth, and discover exactly how and why the Americans came to hold their ground."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : the Napoleonic Wars : the Battle of Waterloo( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"At the Battle of Waterloo a quarter of a million men fought one of the most intense, bitter clashes in history. As many as fifty thousand men and ten thousand horses were brutally killed on the battlefield. By the end of the battle the Duke of Wellington had achieved the unthinkable - the defeat of the legendary Emperor of France. Using the latest scientific techniques and historical analysis Battlefield Detectives answers: What gave Wellington the edge at Waterloo? How did he achieve such an unlikely victory? Was it luck, skill or mistakes made by his infamous opponent?"--Publisher's web site
The Mexican American War by Samuel H Mayo( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"On May 8th 1846 the armies of Mexico and the United States met in battle at a place called Palo Alto, near Brownsville, deep in Southern Texas. The two countries had been anticipating war since the annexation of Texas in 1845. For Mexico, Texas was too important to surrender and at Palo Alto, the battle began. The future President, General Zachary Taylor led the Americans. Among his officers, 51 future generals including Ulysses S. Grant and George Meade. The US commanders in the field represented a new generation of professional soldiers. But for over 150 years, what really happened here has remained a mystery. The only official contemporaneous sketches of the battle implied that it ended in a draw. Yet by day's end, the Mexican army was in full retreat. Archaeologists, forensic scientists and historians join forces, with the assistance of tests at the US Army's Yuma Missile Proving Ground, they are cracking the puzzle of what really happened."--Publisher's web site
World War One : the Somme( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In just one day almost 60,000 British soldiers were killed or wounded. Why was this first day on the Somme such a disaster for the British?
Battlefield detectives : the Civil War : Shiloh( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"One of the great routs, indeed one of the great shocks, of the Civil War was the Confederate defeat at Shiloh. They had chosen the battlefield; they had chosen the moment to attack; and they achieved almost total strategic and tactical surprise. Twelve hours after their surprise attack they were in a commanding position, but the next day they withdrew in disarray. For nearly 150 years Confederate failure has been blamed on the fact that they lost valuable time at the Hornet's Nest, where a detachment of Union soldiers held the line. But through forensic history Battlefield Detectives uncovers a very different story of why things went so badly for the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh."--Publisher's web site
The Revolutionary War : the Battle of Oriskany( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Oriskany was a massacre. Four hundred Patriot militiamen out of a force of eight hundred died for the loss of less than eighty Loyalists, making it the bloodiest battle of the Revolutionary War. Most surprisingly, the ambushers were mainly warriors of the Seneca and Mohawk nations fighting with the British and armed with tomahawks, knives and war clubs. In this revealing episode, Battlefield Detectives analyzes the evidence, dramatically re-enacts the engagement, and discovers what made the battle so bloody and why so many militiamen had to die. Scholars and historians explain the little known story of American Indian involvement in the Revolutionary War."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : Rome versus Gaul : the siege of Alesia( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"To the victor go not only the spoils, but the chance to dictate history, to create the version of events that will be passed down through generations as unquestionable truth. Such was the case when Rome's supreme general, Julius Caesar, defeated a quarter million Gauls at Alesia with fifty-thousand Roman soldiers. Extraordinary indeed, but until now we've had to rely only on Caesar's account of the battle that shaped the map of modern Europe. How did he do it? Battlefield Detectives challenges the word of Caesar and the weight of history with recent archaeological discoveries, systematic analysis of Roman warfare, and extraordinary photographic evidence that reveal the secrets of Caesar's success. In this amazing episode, gain knowledge that has been lost for two thousand years."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : American Revolution : Battle of Cowpens( Visual )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Battle of Cowpens was one of the most critical battles of the American Revolution. It was a signpost and it pointed directly to Yorktown where the British would finally surrender less than a year later. The Battle took place on January 17th 1781 in South Carolina. An American force led by a brilliant Revolutionary War commander called Daniel Morgan routed a British army under the command of an imperious and greatly feared young cavalry colonel called Banastre Tarleton. Tarleton, known as "Bloody Ban", was the most hated British officer in the south because of his ruthless tactics. His force was made up of seasoned British and loyalist regular troops. Morgan's professional army was small. He had to rely heavily on part-time militia troops who had a reputation for running away at the first sight of British redcoats wielding bayonets. Now historians, soil scientists, tacticians, psychologists, geographers and weapons experts have combined their disciplines to analyze this important clash between American Patriots and King George's men. Through their efforts we discover how and why Morgan's amateurs managed to totally destroy a force belonging to the world's best trained and most feared Army."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : World War Two : the Battle of Britain( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Early in WWII, during the summer of 1940, only the outmatched RAF appeared to stand in the way of Hitler's conquest of Europe. But the well-laid German plans snagged on dogged English opposition and the Battle of Britain raged for 114 days. Battlefield Detectives analyses the vast arena of this epic face-off, which encompassed the skies across the English Channel and over the countryside of southeast Britain. Churchill said "never was so much owed by so many to so few." For sixty years, the common view of the Battle of Britain has been of an unprepared nation winning against overwhelming odds, a tale of desperate heroism, of a handful of plucky pilots lucking into a world-saving victory. In this episode of Battlefield Detectives, scientists, historians and veterans reveal that in fact Britain was far from unprepared."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : World War One : the Somme( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"World War I, trenches and barbed wire ran across the entire continent of Europe from the Mediterranean to the North Sea. At 7:30am on July 1st, 1916, after a devastating artillery bombardment lasting more than a week, 100,000 British soldiers waited in their trenches ready to advance on the German lines. They'd been told to expect minimal resistance, but as they picked their way slowly across no-man's-land, guns opened fire. Shells burst overhead, and waves of men were machine-gunned down. It was a military catastrophe of unprecedented proportions. Filmed on the battlefield itself, in laboratories and on firing ranges - archaeologists, military historians, and other experts from disciplines as diverse as metallurgy and geology investigate the factors and conduct tests to replicate and understand the factors that turned one terrible day into the bloodiest in the history of the British Army."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : World War One : the Battle of Jutland( Visual )

2 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"When the smoke cleared over the North Sea, the world's great armadas--the German High Seas Fleet and the British Grand Fleet--were in tatters; nearly 9000 sailors perished and over 175,000 shipping tons were destroyed. Both sides claimed victory, but by most measures (including simply avoiding total annihilation) the audacious Germans, who had provoked the encounter with their far-mightier foe, came out ahead. It was an epic battle the British should have sewn up. Unchallenged since the Battle of Trafalgar, the global dominance of the British Royal Navy was unquestioned. Yet the Germans, far outgunned and without the element of surprise due to a captured codebook, nevertheless humiliated the world's dominant war machine. The Battle of Jutland is a textbook case taught in every war college in the world; it has been examined minutely from every angle but new findings, including pioneering underwater archeology in 2003, have given rise to new theories about the epic conflict. Using the latest modern science, Battlefield Detectives investigates and asks: what went wrong? Why was Jutland so disastrous for the Royal Navy? And could it be that, in losing the battle, they won the naval war?"--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : World War Two : the Battle of the Bulge( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"WWII hung in the balance in December of 1944. By all rights, the Nazi's bold, shocking Ardennes Offensive should have routed the Allied forces hunkered down in the cold Belgian countryside. But, while the front certainly bulged during the two months of terrible fighting, it never collapsed. Battlefield Detectives investigates the horrific Battle of the Bulge and discovers why the German Army failed and the world escaped its unending tyranny."--Publisher's web site
Battlefield detectives : World War Two : the guns of Pointe du Hoc( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Hit the beach and get to the bottom of one of the most heroic and unlikely missions of D-Day. The largest invasion in history, an unprecedented single-day mobilization of military force, succeeded in many ways due to the actions of just a few men. In one critical mission, a force of only 200 US Rangers -- a new unit trained by British commandos in Scotland -- had the impossible task of securing clifftop artillery emplacements that threatened the Allied offensive. Climbing the ninety foot cliffs under a storm of German bullets and grenades, the Rangers found that the German guns were not where they should be. What followed was a desperate game of cat and mouse, as the Rangers attempted to hunt down the guns. With trademark drama and insight, Battlefield Detectives reveals how the heavily outnumbered US Rangers took, held and destroyed the guns of Pointe du Hoc."--Publisher's web site
 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.25 (from 0.13 for World War ... to 0.34 for Battlefiel ...)

Languages
English (26)