WorldCat Identities

Tavoni, Massimo

Overview
Works: 102 works in 155 publications in 1 language and 540 library holdings
Roles: Other, Author, Editor, Contributor
Classifications: QC903, 363.73874
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Massimo Tavoni
Regional Carbon Budgets : Do They Matter for Climate Policy? by Massimo Tavoni( )

in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Climate change mitigation, technological innovation and adaptation : a new perspective on climate policy by Valentina Bosetti( )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book presents provides a rigorous yet accessible treatment of the main topics in climate change policy using a large body of research generated using WITCH (World Induced Technical Change Hybrid), an innovative and path-breaking integrated assessment model
The incentives to participate in and the stability of international climate coalitions : a game-theoretic approach using the witch model( )

6 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses WITCH, an integrated assessment model with a game-theoretic structure, to explore the prospects for, and the stability of broad coalitions to achieve ambitious climate change mitigation action. Only coalitions including all large emitting regions are found to be technically able to meet a concentration stabilisation target below 550 ppm CO2eq by 2100. Once the free-riding incentives of non-participants are taken into account, only a "grand coalition" including virtually all regions can be successful. This grand coalition is profitable as a whole, implying that all countries can gain from participation provided appropriate transfers are made across them. However, neither the grand coalition nor smaller but still environmentally significant coalitions appear to be stable. This is because the collective welfare surplus from cooperation is not found to be large enough for transfers to offset the free-riding incentives of all countries simultaneously. Some factors omitted from the analysis, which might improve coalition stability, include the co-benefits from mitigation action, the costless removal of fossil fuel subsidies, as well as alternative assumptions regarding countries' bargaining behaviour
The Role of R&D and Technology Diffusion in Climate Change Mitigation : New Perspectives Using the WITCH Model( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses the WITCH model, a computable general equilibrium model with endogenous technological change, to explore the impact of various climate policies on energy technology choices and the costs of stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations. Current and future expected carbon prices appear to have powerful effects on R&D spending and clean technology diffusion. Their impact on stabilisation costs depends on the nature of R&D: R&D targeted at incremental energy efficiency improvements has only limited effects, but R&D focused on the emergence of major new low-carbon technologies could lower costs drastically if successful - especially in the non-electricity sector, where such low-carbon options are scarce today. With emissions coming from multiple sources, keeping a wide range of options available matters more for stabilisation costs than improving specific technologies. Due to international knowledge spillovers, stabilisation costs could be further reduced through a complementary, global R&D policy. However, a strong price signal is always required
Climate change mitigation strategies in fast-growing countries the benefits of early action by Valentina Bosetti( Book )

11 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper builds on the assumption that OECD countries are (or will soon be) taking actions to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. These actions, however, will not be sufficient to control global warming, unless developing countries also get involved in the cooperative effort to reduce GHG emissions. This paper investigates the best short-term strategies that emerging economies can adopt in reacting to OECD countries mitigation effort, given the common long-term goal to prevent excessive warming without hampering economic growth. Results indicate that developing countries would incur substantial economic losses by following a myopic strategy that disregards climate in the short-run, and that their optimal investment behaviour is to anticipate the implementation of a climate policy by roughly 10 years. Investing in innovation ahead of time is also found to be advantageous. The degree of policy anticipation is shown to be important in determining the financial transfers of an international carbon market meant to provide incentives for the participation of developing countries. This is especially relevant for China, whose recent and foreseeable trends of investments in innovation are consistent with the adoption of domestic emission reduction obligations in 2030
Delayed participation of developing countries to climate agreements : should action in the EU and US be postponed by Valentina Bosetti( Book )

9 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The role of R & D and technology diffusion in climate change mitigation : new perspectives using the WITCH model( Book )

4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses the WITCH model, a computable general equilibrium model with endogenous technological change, to explore the impact of various climate policies on energy technology choices and the costs of stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations. Current and future expected carbon prices appear to have powerful effects on R & D spending and clean technology diffusion. Their impact on stabilisation costs depends on the nature of R & D: R & D targeted at incremental energy efficiency improvements has only limited effects, but R & D focused on the emergence of major new low-carbon technologies could lower costs drastically if successful - especially in the non-electricity sector, where such low-carbon options are scarce today. With emissions coming from multiple sources, keeping a wide range of options available matters more for stabilisation costs than improving specific technologies. Due to international knowledge spillovers, stabilisation costs could be further reduced through a complementary, global R & D policy. However, a strong price signal is always required
Human capital, innovation, and climate policy : an integrated assessment by Carlo Carraro( Book )

6 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper looks at the interplay between human capital and innovation in the presence of climate and educational policies. Using recent empirical estimates, human capital and general purpose R&D are introduced in an integrated assessment model that has been extensively applied to study the climate change mitigation. Our results suggest that climate policy stimulates general purpose as well as clean energy R&D but reduces the incentive to invest in human capital formation. Human capital increases the productivity of labour and the complementarity between labour and energy drives its pollution-using effect (direct effect). When human capital is an essential input in the production of generic and energy dedicated knowledge, the crowding out induced by climate policy is mitigated, thought not completely offset (indirect effect). The pollution-using implications of the direct effect prevail over the indirect contribution of human capital to the creation of new and cleaner knowledge. A policy mix that combines educational as well as climate objectives offsets the human capital crowding-out with a moderate, short-term consumption loss. Human capital is complement to all forms of innovation and an educational policy stimulates both energy and general purpose innovation. This result has important policy implications considering the growing concern that effective climate policy is conditional on solid economic development and therefore it needs to be supplemented by other policy targets
The Incentives to Participate in and the Stability of International Climate Coalitions : a Game-Theoretic Approach Using the WITCH Model( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses WITCH, an integrated assessment model with a game-theoretic structure, to explore the prospects for, and the stability of broad coalitions to achieve ambitious climate change mitigation action. Only coalitions including all large emitting regions are found to be technically able to meet a concentration stabilisation target below 550 ppm CO2eq by 2100. Once the free-riding incentives of non-participants are taken into account, only a "grand coalition" including virtually all regions can be successful. This grand coalition is profitable as a whole, implying that all countries can gain from participation provided appropriate transfers are made across them. However, neither the grand coalition nor smaller but still environmentally significant coalitions appear to be stable. This is because the collective welfare surplus from cooperation is not found to be large enough for transfers to offset the free-riding incentives of all countries simultaneously. Some factors omitted from the analysis, which might improve coalition stability, include the co-benefits from mitigation action, the costless removal of fossil fuel subsidies, as well as alternative assumptions regarding countries' bargaining behaviour
The Role of R & D and Technology Diffusion in Climate Change Mitigation : New Perspectives Using the WITCH Model( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper uses the WITCH model, a computable general equilibrium model with endogenous technological change, to explore the impact of various climate policies on energy technology choices and the costs of stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations. Current and future expected carbon prices appear to have powerful effects on R & D spending and clean technology diffusion. Their impact on stabilisation costs depends on the nature of R & D: R & D targeted at incremental energy efficiency improvements has only limited effects, but R & D focused on the emergence of major new low-carbon technologies could lower costs drastically if successful - especially in the non-electricity sector, where such low-carbon options are scarce today. With emissions coming from multiple sources, keeping a wide range of options available matters more for stabilisation costs than improving specific technologies. Due to international knowledge spillovers, stabilisation costs could be further reduced through a complementary, global R & D policy. However, a strong price signal is always required
Delayed action and uncertain targets how much will climate policy cost? by Valentina Bosetti( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The optimal energy mix in power generation and the contribution from natural gas in reducing carbon emissions to 2030 and beyond by Carlo Carraro( Book )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper analyses a set of new scenarios for energy markets in Europe to evaluate the consistency of economic incentives and climate objectives. It focuses in particular on the role of natural gas across a range of climate policy scenarios (including the Copenhagen Pledges and the EU Roadmap) to identify whether current trend and policies are leading to an economically efficient and, at the same time, climate friendly, energy mix. Economic costs and environmental objectives are balanced to identify the welfare-maximising development path, the related investment strategies in the energy sector, and the resulting optimal energy mix. Policy measures to support this balanced economic development are identified. A specific sensitivity analysis upon the role of the 2020 renewable targets and increased energy efficiency improvements is also carried out. We conclude that a suitable and sustained carbon price needs to be implemented to move energy markets in Europe closer to the optimal energy mix. We also highlight that an appropriate carbon pricing is sufficient to achieve both the emission target and the renewable target, without incurring in high economic costs if climate policy is not too ambitious and/or it is internationally coordinated. Finally, our results show that natural gas is the key transitional fuel within the cost-effective achievement of a range of climate policy targets
Optimal energy investment and R & D strategies to stabilise greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations by Valentina Bosetti( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The stabilisation of GHG atmospheric concentrations at levels expected to prevent dangerous climate change has become an important, global, long-term objective. It is therefore crucial to identify a cost-effective way to achieve this objective. In this paper we use WITCH, a hybrid climate-energy-economy model, to obtain a quantitative assessment of some cost-effective strategies that stabilise CO2 concentrations at 550 or 450 ppm. In particular, this paper analyses the energy investment and R & D policies that optimally achieve these two GHG stabilisation targets (i.e. the future optimal energy mix consistent with the stabilisation of GHG atmospheric concentrations at 550 and 450 ppm). Given that the model accounts for interdependencies and spillovers across 12 regions of the world, optimal strategies are the outcome of a dynamic game through which inefficiency costs induced by global strategic interactions can be assessed. Therefore, our results are somehow different from previous analyses of GHG stabilisation policies, where a central planner or a single global economy are usually assumed. In particular, the effects of free-riding incentives in reducing emissions and in investing in R & D are taken into account. Technical change being endogenous in WITCH, this paper also provides an assessment of the implications of technological evolution in the energy sector of different stabilisation scenarios. Finally, this paper quantifies the net costs of stabilising GHG concentrations at different levels, for different allocations of permits and for different technological scenarios. In each case, the optimal long-term investment strategies for all available energy technologies are determined. The case of an unknown backstop energy technology is also analysed
International energy R & D spillovers and the economics of greenhouse gas atmospheric stabilization by Valentina Bosetti( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is widely recognized that technological change has the potential to reduce GHG emissions without compromising economic growth; hence, any better understanding of the process of technological innovation is likely to increase our knowledge of mitigation possibilities and costs. This paper explores how international knowledge flows affect the dynamics of the domestic R & D sector and the main economic and environmental variables. The analysis is performed using WITCH, a dynamic regional model of the world economy, in which energy technical change is endogenous. The focus is on disembodied energy R & D international spillovers. The basic questions are as follows. Do knowledge spillovers enhance energy technological innovation in different regions of the world? Does the speed of innovation increase? Or do free-riding incentives prevail and international spillovers crowd out domestic R & D efforts? Our analysis shows that international knowledge spillovers tend to increase free-riding incentives and decrease the investments in energy R & D. The strongest cuts in energy R & D investments are recorded among High Income countries, where international knowledge flows crowd out domestic R & D efforts. The overall domestic pool of knowledge, and thus total net GHG stabilization costs, remain largely unaffected. We also analyze the implication of a policy mix in which climate policy is combined with a technology policy designed to enhance absorption capacity in developing countries. Significant positive impacts on the costs of stabilising GHG concentrations are then singled out
Human capital formation and global warming mitigation : evidence from an integrated assessment model by Carlo Carraro( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Learning from nationally determined contributions by Joseph E Aldy( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National governments have submitted emission mitigation pledges under the Paris Agreement that vary considerably in their form, level of required emission mitigation, elaboration of non-emission goals, and implementation strategies. As a result, domestic emission mitigation programs necessary to deliver on the Paris pledges will diverge in the degree to which that mitigation will be achieved at least cost. This paper explores both what we learn from how national determined contributions (NDCs) diverge from least-cost policies and the implications for comparing mitigation effort. The NDCs can reveal a country's preferences over climate policy, economic development, and other priorities. Modeling analysis of the NDCs can highlight opportunities for (i) measuring the revealed cost of institutional and political constraints that limit least cost implementation; (ii) mitigating climate change alongside other policy objectives; (iii) policy learning over time. We undertake two case studies based on global energy-economic models to illustrate how implementation of NDCs may deviate from least-cost implementation. In the first case study, we employ the WITCH model to assess how the non-emissions goals in NDCs may constrain implementation in a way that increases costs related to cost-effective emissions abatement. In the second case study, we employ the DNE21+ model to assess how countries' stated domestic implementation policies may diverge from a cost-effective domestic mitigation policy. These modelling analyses serve to illustrate how comparing mitigation implementation can then be represented by a bounding exercise that develops both conservative and generous estimates of mitigation effort
Optimal energy investment and R&D strategies to stabilise Greenhouse Gas atmospheric concentrations( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Delayed participation of developing countries to climate agreements should action in the EU and US be postponed?( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper analyses the cost implications for climate policy in developed countries if developing countries are unwilling to adopt measures to reduce their own GHG emissions. First, we assume that a 450 CO2 (550 CO2e) ppmv stabilisation target is to be achieved and that Non Annex1 (NA1) countries decide to delay their GHG emission reductions by 30 years. What would be the cost difference between this scenario and a case in which both developed and developing countries start reducing their emissions at the same time? Then, we look at a scenario in which the timing of developing countries' participation is uncertain and again we compute the costs of climate policy in developed and developing countries. We find that delayed participation of NA1 countries has a negative impact on climate policy costs. Economic inefficiencies can be as large as 10-25 TlnUSD. However, this additional cost wanes when developing countries are allowed to trade emission reductions from their baseline emission paths during the 30-year delay period. Thus, irrespective of whether NA1 countries are immediately assigned an emission reduction target or not, they should nonetheless be included in a global carbon market. Technology deployment is also affected by the timing of developing countries' mitigation measures. Delayed NA1-country participation in a climate agreement would scale down the deployment of coal with CCS throughout the century. On the other hand, innovation in the form of energy R&D investments would be positively affected, since it would become crucial in developed countries. Finally, uncertainty about the timing of NA1-country participation does not modify the optimal abatement strategy for developed countries and does not alter policy costs as long as a global carbon market is in place. - Delayed action ; climate policy ; stabilisation costs ; uncertain participation
International energy R&D spillovers and the economics of greenhouse gas atmospheric stabilization( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human capital formation and global warming mitigation evidence from an integrated assessment model ; presented at CESifo Venice Summer Institute, July 2009 by Carlo Carraro( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Massimo Tavoni wetenschapper

Tavoni, M.

Languages
English (69)