WorldCat Identities

Space Disturbances Laboratory (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 54 works in 70 publications in 1 language and 818 library holdings
Genres: Observations 
Classifications: QC881.2.I6,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Space Disturbances Laboratory (U.S.)
 
Most widely held works by Space Disturbances Laboratory (U.S.)
Species densities in the lower thermosphere compatible with the U.S. Standard Atmosphere by G. W Adams( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

O₂, N₂, and O number density profiles have been constructed in the 80-120 km region compatible with the U. S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962, and the U. S. Standard Atmosphere Supplements, 1966. Profiles have been constructed at 15, 30, 45, and 60°N, for winter, summer, and spring/fall
Final report on High Altitude Nuclear Detection Studies by C. E Hornback( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report gives an account of the High Altitude Nuclear Detection Studies (HANDS) conducted at the Boulder Laboratories of the National Bureau of Standards and later of the Environmental Sciences Services Administration (ESSA) from approximately 1963 to 1968. This project represented a pioneer effort in the acquisition and processing of digital data from different disciplines of geophysics. It was one of the first in which an on-line computer formed an integral part of the experiment. Volume I concerns the facilities: the building, the automatic data-processing equipment, and the sensors. Volume II deals with the results obtained and an overall appraisal of the work
Instrumentation of small rockets for polar cap absorption studies by J. C Haslett( Book )

4 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The instrumentation of small sounding rockets for scientific experiments in the region from 50 km to approximately 110 km is described. These particular rockets were developed to measure the diurnal variations of proton spectra and electron densities during solar proton events. Seven rockets were flown with each carrying a three-channel proton spectrometer and a three-frequency Faraday rotation experiment. The proton spectrometer and Faraday rotation experiment are discussed in some detail.Because of difficulties experienced with the telemetry, considerable telemetry development had to be done. Although the telemetry was developed specifically for these rockets, it is of general interest and is described. In particular the report mentions modifications of the rocket antenna system, the voltage controlled oscillators, and the modification of a parametric amplifier for use with the Ft. Churchill range telemetry.Block diagram and photographs are included in the text, while detailed schematics of the pertinent electronics are included in an appendix
Effects of polar cap absorption events on geostationary satellite VHF communications systems by Joseph Horace Pope( Book )

3 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For aircraft operating in high latitude regions, communications using geostationary satellite relay may at times be affected by a phenomenon known as polar cap absorption (PCA). PCA is caused by charged particles, mainly protons, precipitating into the polar cap regions. The resultant increase of electron density in the lower ionosphere where the collision frequency is high, is responsible for the attenuation of signals passing through the region. In order to compute the amount of absorption and its geographical extent, different models of incident particle flux were assumed. The amount of absorption to be expected was computed at several different frequencies, including the VHF frequency at 137 MHz. Calculations were made assuming various values for particle cutoff energies. This parameter was in turn used to define the geographical boundaries of the polar cap region. Having thus obtained models for polar cap absorption, computations were made taking into consideration the angle of the ray to the satellite and the position at which the ray intersects the absorbing region. The results were used to obtain contours of oblique 137 MHz absorption relative to 30 MHz polar cap absorption. It is shown that, depending on latitude and other factors, the oblique 137 MHz absorption may be about 0.5 of the polar cap vertical absorption at 30 MHz. As the latter sometimes reaches values in excess of 20 dB, the former at times exceeds lo dB. Data from past PCA events were analyzed statistically to obtain a number of factors of importance to communications systems. The amounts of absorption that occurred at various peak levels since 1955 were determined. The cumulative distribution in the number of hours of absorption and day-to-day variations in amplitudes were Studied for PCA occurring during the 1957 solar cycle peak. These results confirm the dependence on solar cycle of the number of PCA events. During the interval 1955-1969, 117 significant 30 MHz PCA events occurred, of which about 25% were greater than 5 dB, while less than 10% were greater than 15 dB. These values extrapolate for 137 MHz oblique absorption to about 2 dB and 7 dB, respectively
An analysis of sudden ionospheric disturbances associated with the proton flare of 0026 UT, July 7, 1966 by Richard Frank Donnelly( Book )

3 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An analysis of sudden ionospheric disturbances associated with the proton flare of 1522 UT, August 28, 1966 by Richard Frank Donnelly( Book )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Early detection of a solar flare : a study of x-ray, extreme ultraviolet, h-alpha, and solar radio emission from solar flares by Richard Frank Donnelly( Book )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Solar X-ray, extreme ultraviolet, H[alpha] and radio emission were studies to determine what solar radiation is best suited for an automatic flare alarm system aboard a satellite for the detection of the start of a solar flare. Although hard X-rays ([lambda] <<1 Å), centimeter-wavelength solar radio bursts, and flashes at certain EUV wavelengths usually have faster rise times and peak earlier than soft X-rays in the 2-16 Å range, the data available to date show that on the average the start time of the 2-16 Å X-rays occurs earlier than the start times for these other types of data. The early start times and large percentage increase of 2-16 Å X-rays make this radiation the best suited for the automatic detection of solar flares for the present state of the art of solar radiation measurements
Sources, losses, and transport of magnetospherically trapped particles by D. J Williams( Book )

2 editions published in 1970 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trapping, pseudo-trapping, and nontrapping regions within an observed magnetospheric configuration are described. Time averages proton and electron distributions and available data concerning the alpha particle distribution within the trapping and pseudo-trapping regions are presented. A review of the observational evidence leading to the identification of major sources, losses, and transport of magnetospherically trapped particles is given. Conclusions are summarized and additional suggestions offered in these areas for inner and outer zone protons and electrons. One general result of this review is that much is now known of source, loss, and transport processes, although specific experiments and calculations must still be done. It is shown that the inclusion of pitch angle diffusion processes within the magnetosphere significantly alters the concept of a stable trapping and allows a consistent quiescent description of outer zone electrons to be formulated from energies of a few tens of kilovolts to several Mev
On the detection of sudden ionospheric disturbances by A. Glenn Jean( Book )

2 editions published in 1969 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A comparison was made of sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) reported in IER-FB Solar-Geophysical Data and SIDs detected at Boulder, Colorado, by project HANDS in February 1967. The FB reports were collected from single experiments. One of the main problems in the comparison was the relatively large spread in the times of SIDs reported to FB, and factors contributing to this spread in time are discussed. Some advantages in the collocated experiment system are shown to be 1) considerably reduced spread in starting times of SID signatures, 2) high detection sensitivity due to the ability to identify small but simultaneous perturbations in parallel data channels, 3) high level of confidence of SID observed in three or more data channels. Based on these findings, a suggestion is made for improving the SID detection and reporting through the addition of a uniform set of phase coherent equipment at three or more stations spaced around the earth to provide continuous SID monitoring
Extreme ultraviolet flashes of solar flares observed via sudden frequency deviations by Richard Frank Donnelly( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Observations of ionospheric disturbances in Antarctica during 1968 by J. E Jones( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes an experiment to observe the structure of radio echoes from the Antarctic ionosphere during 1968, and to thereby study the effects of traveling ionospheric disturbances. A 6-MHz CW signal transmitted from South Pole Station was received at Byrd, McMurdo, and Plateau Stations. Fluctuations in the received frequency were recorded by the Doppler method. Various features observed in the records are explained by ionospheric models involving electron drifts and atmospheric waves
Contribution of x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation of solar flares to sudden frequency deviations by Richard Frank Donnelly( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

High time and intensity resolution satellite measurements of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation during solar flares are studied to determine the wavelength dependence of the flare radiation responsible for sudden frequency deviations (SFD). SFD's measure the flare-induced effects in the E and F1 regions of the ionosphere and are in effect like a broadband (1-1030 Å) detector for impulsive flare enhancements. He II 303.8 Å, O V 629.7 Å, H Ly [upsilon] 972.5 Å, C III 977.0 Å, and H Ly [alpha] 1215.7 Å were found to have essentially the same time dependence as the total ionizing radiation producing SFD's, except that they decay faster than the net 1-1030 Å radiation. Flare enhancements of Fe XV 284.1 Å, Fe XVI 335.3 Å, Si XII 499.3 Å. Mg X 625.3 Å, and Ne VIII 770.4 Å, which are normally coronal lines, appear to have a much slower time dependence than the radiation responsible for SFD's. X-rays in the 0.5-3 Å range are slightly slower than the radiation responsible for SFD's during the decay stage; 1-8 Å X-ray flares are slower, especially during the decay stages; and 8-20 Å flare radiation enhancements are slower throughout the entire SFD
SIXBIT : a generalized reaction kinetics program by G. W Adams( Book )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Observation of traveling ionospheric disturbances by the Doppler technique with spaced transmitters by J. E Jones( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes a radio investigation of traveling ionospheric disturbances carried out near Boulder, Colorado, over a 1-year period from June 1967 to June 1968. The three-dimensional motions of F2 layer disturbances were measured by the high frequency Doppler technique with spaced transmitters and at several probing frequencies. Horizontal motions were determined by cross-correlating three signals on frequencies near 5 MHz, whose reflection points were approximately at the corners of a horizontal equilateral triangle with 40-km sides. Vertical motions were determined from cross-correlation of signals on frequencies of 3.3, 4.0, and 5.1 MHz, whose reflection points were aligned vertically
A review of some ionospheric studies based on a high-frequency doppler technique by D. M Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report contains a review of the work done on frequency fluctuations of ionospheric radio echoes on high frequencies. The historical aspects are briefly discussed to show the development of research on solar flare effects and the motion of ionospheric irregularities. The recording program over the past 7 years and the equipment modifications involved are discussed. This is followed by a brief review of the elementary theory underlying frequency fluctuations. In most of the report the mathematical equations are listed in tables rather than distributed throughout the text. Solar flare effects (called sudden frequency deviations) are used to determine the relaxation time of the ionosphere
Hall-effect magnetometers in scientific rocket payloads by Gordon M Lerfald( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two Hall effect magnetometers suitable for use in small rocket payloads have been designed and built. One of these is capable of measuring the components of the earth's magnetic field with resolution of a few tens of gammas. The other is a very simple instrument suitable for use as a rocket aspect sensor. Design considerations are discussed, the magnetometers developed are described, and the results of laboratory tests are given
A two-channel photometer for use in small sounding rockets by J. C Haslett( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A two-channel photometer has been designed as primarily for use in small sounding rockets. Four have been flown sucessfully to study the diurnal variation of the 0₂ (¹[delta]g) concentration by measuring 1.27 [mu] radiation from the (¹[delta]g - ³[sigma]g⁻) transition. The performace was satisfactory and comparable to similar instruments. The goal was to develop a small photometer with optics suitable for small detectors including photomultipliers. This was achieved, with the light baffling system being particularly good. The optics, electronics, and mechanical considerations are discussed, with a few sources of difficulty being pointed out. The laboratory and field calibration procedures which were followed are described
Long-range forecast of geomagnetic activity, 1970-73 by R. H Olson( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A statistical analysis is made of geomagnetic and auroral data over the last eight sunspot cycles. It is shown that the maximum in geomagnetic-auroral activity lags behind the sunspot maximum by 2-3 years. Taking into account this lag-relationship, and the semiannual wave in geomagnetic activity, it is possible to extrapolate ahead for the next 4 years and predict monthly averages of Ap and number of occurrences per month of Ap >̲ 30. The predictions could also be used as indicators of future auroral activity
Solar proton monitoring system by G. W Adams( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A real-time solar-proton monitoring system with ground-based sensors is located in Alaska and other parts of the United States, Greenland, and Canada. A computer in Anchorage, Alaska, interrogates the sensors, processes the data, and transmits the information via teletype to the Solar Forecast Center in Boulder, Colorado. This report describes the physics of the system, i.e., the characteristics of the events (PCA's, auroras, SID's, REP's, and solar noise bursts), how the sensors (riometers, VLF phase and amplitude, forward scatter, neutron monitors, and magnetometers) respond to these events, how these characteristics are programmed to detect the different events, and how the sensor readings are used to obtain information about solar protons. A second report will give details on a set of rocket experiments to be fired into PCA events
N₂, O₂ and O densities in the 80-120 km region compatible with the U.S. standard atmosphere by G. W Adams( )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

O2, N2, and O number density profiles have been constructed in the 80-120 km region compatible with the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962, and the U.S. Standard Atmosphere Supplements, 1966. Profiles have been constructed at 15, 30, A5, and 60[deg]N, for winter, summer, and spring/fall
 
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Alternative Names
Institute for Telecommunication Sciences and Aeronomy Boulder, Colo Space Disturbances Laboratory

Institute for Telecommunication Sciences and Aeronomy Space Disturbances Laboratory

United States. Environmental Science Services Administration. Research Laboratories. Space Disturbances Laboratory

United States Space Disturbances Laboratory

USA Department of Commerce Space Disturbances Laboratory

USA Environmental Science Services Administration Space Disturbances Laboratory

Languages
English (34)