WorldCat Identities

Binici, Mahir

Overview
Works: 17 works in 57 publications in 2 languages and 710 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HG3810, 330
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mahir Binici
Controlling capital? : legal restrictions and the asset composition of international financial flows by Mahir Binici( )

13 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 496 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How effective are capital account restrictions? We provide new answers based on a novel panel data set of capital controls, disaggregated by asset class and by inflows/outflows, covering 74 countries during 1995-2005. We find the estimated effects of capital controls to vary markedly across the types of capital controls, both by asset categories, by the direction of flows, and across countries' income levels. In particular, both debt and equity controls can substantially reduce outflows, with little effect on capital inflows, but only high-income countries appear able to effectively impose deb
Credit ratings and the pricing of sovereign debt during the euro crisis by Joshua Aizenman( )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates the impact of credit rating changes on the sovereign spreads in the European Union and investigates the macro and financial factors that account for the time varying effects of a given credit rating change. We find that changes of ratings are informative, economically important and highly statistically significant in panel models even after controlling for a host of domestic and global fundamental factors and investigating various functional forms, time and country groupings and dynamic structures. Dynamic panel model estimates indicate that a credit rating upgrade decreases CDS spreads by about 45 basis points, on average, for EU countries. However, the association between credit rating changes and spreads shifted markedly between the pre-crisis and crisis periods. European countries had quite similar CDS responses to credit rating changes during the pre-crisis period, but that large differences emerged during the crisis period between the now highly-sensitive GIIPS group and other European country groupings (EU and Euro Area excluding GIIPS, and the non-EU area). We also find a complicated non-linear pattern dependent on the level of the credit rating. The results are robust to the including credit "outlook" or "watch" signals by credit rating agencies. In addition, contagion from rating downgrades in GIIPS to other euro countries is not evident once own-country credit rating changes are taken into account
The transmission of Federal Reserve tapering news to emerging financial markets by Joshua Aizenman( )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper evaluates the impact of tapering “news” announcements by Fed senior policy makers on financial markets in emerging economies. We apply a panel framework using daily data, and find that emerging market asset prices respond most to statements by Fed Chairman Bernanke, and much less to other Fed officials. We group emerging markets into those with “robust” fundamentals (current account surpluses, high international reserves and low external debt) and those with “fragile” fundamentals and, intriguingly, find that the stronger group was more adversely exposed to tapering news than the weaker group. News of tapering coming from Chairman Bernanke is associated with much larger exchange rate depreciation, drops in the stock market, and increases in sovereign CDS spreads of the robust group compared with the fragile group. A possible interpretation is that tapering news had less impact on countries that received fewer inflows of funds in the first instance during the quantitative years and had less to lose in terms of repatriation of capital and reversal of carry-trade activities
Exchange market pressure in OECD and emerging economies domestic vs. external factors and capital flows in the old and new normal by Joshua Aizenman( )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We study the ways domestic and external global factors (such as risk appetite, global liquidity, U.S. monetary policy, and commodity prices) affected the exchange market pressure before and after the global financial crisis as well as the role of these factors during the Federal Reserve's tapering episode. Utilizing a comprehensive database on capital controls, we investigate whether control measures have a significant impact on mitigating exchange market pressure associated with capital flows [net and gross]. Using quarterly data over the 2000-2014 period and a dynamic panel model estimation, we find that external factors played a significant role in driving exchange market pressure for both OECD countries and emerging market countries, with a larger impact on the latter. While the effect of net capital flows on exchange market pressure is muted, short-term gross portfolio inflows and outflows comprise important factors that account for exchange market pressure. Short-term portfolio flows and long-term foreign direct investment flows have a significant impact on exchange market pressure for emerging market economies and no significant effect for OECD countries. Capital controls seem to significantly reduce the exchange market pressure although the economic size of this impact is highly dependent on the institutional quality
Exchange rate dynamics under alternative optimal interest rate rules by Mahir Binici( Book )

7 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We explore the role of interest rate policy in the exchange rate determination process. Specifically, we derive exchange rate equations from interest rate rules that are theoretically optimal under a few alternative settings. The exchange rate equation depends on its underlying interest rate rule and its performance could vary across evaluation criteria and sample periods. The exchange rate equation implied by the interest rate rule that allows for interest rate and inflation inertia under commitment offers some encouraging results - exchange rate changes "calibrated" from the equation have a positive and significant correlation with actual data, and offer good direction of change prediction. Our exercise also demonstrates the role of the foreign exchange risk premium in determining exchange rates and the difficulty of explaining exchange rate variability using only policy based fundamentals
Trade openness, market competition, and inflation some sectoral evidence from OECD countries by Mahir Binici( Book )

8 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study evaluates the role market competition plays in determining inflation based on sector-level data from OECD countries. In theory, trade openness can affect inflation through changes in market competitiveness and productivity. Nonetheless, previous empirical studies often fail to account for productivity effects, and their results may overstate the role of market competition. This study shows that inflation decreases with greater market competitiveness even after controlling for productivity effects. Indeed, when market competition and productivity effects are both accounted for, trade openness becomes insignificant in explaining inflation. The results support that changes in market competitiveness and productivity are the main channels through which trade openness affects inflation
Macroprudential policy and bank risk by Yener Altunbas( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates the effects of macroprudential policies on bank risk through a large panel of banks operating in 61 advanced and emerging market economies. There are three main findings. First, there is evidence suggesting that macroprudential tools have a significant impact on bank risk. Second, the responses to changes in macroprudential tools differ among banks, depending on their specific balance sheet characteristics. In particular, banks that are small, weakly capitalised and with a higher share of wholesale funding react more strongly to changes in macroprudential tools. Third, controlling for bank-specific characteristics, macroprudential policies are more effective in a tightening than in an easing episode
Three essays in international macroeconomics by Mahir Binici( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reserve requirements, liquidity risk and credit growth( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many central banks in emerging economies have used reserve requirements (RR) to alleviate the trade-off between financial stability and price stability in recent years. Notwithstanding their widespread use, transmission channels of RR have remained largely as a black-box. In this paper, we use bank-level data to explore the interaction between RR and bank lending behavior. Our empirical findings suggest that short-term borrowing from the central bank is not a close substitute for deposits for banks. Bank lending behavior responds significantly to reserve requirements and liquidity positions. Our analysis allows us to identify a new channel that we name as the "liquidity channel". The channel works through a decline in bank liquidity and loan supply due to an increase in reserve requirements
Stock return comovement and systemic risk in the Turkish banking system by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Exchange rate dymanics under alternative optimal interest rate rules by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We explore the role of interest rate policy in the exchange rate determination process. Specifically, we derive exchange rate equations from interest rate rules that are theoretically optimal under a few alternative settings. The exchange rate equation depends on its underlying interest rate rule and its performance could vary across evaluation criteria and sample periods. The exchange rate equation implied by the interest rate rule that allows for interest rate and inflation inertia under commitment offers some encouraging results - exchange rate changes "calibrated" from the equation have a positive and significant correlation with actual data, and offer good direction of change prediction. Our exercise also demonstrates the role of the foreign exchange risk premium in determining exchange rates and the difficulty of explaining exchange rate variability using only policy based fundamentals. -- Taylor Rule ; exchange rate determination ; mean squared prediction error ; direction of change ; foreign exchange risk premium
Do bank stockholders share the burden of required reserve tax? Evidence from Turkey by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study examines whether bank shareholders bear the burden of required reserves tax by analyzing the reaction of banks' stock returns to the changes in the required reserve ratio. Results show that increases in reserve requirements significantly lower bank returns implying that shareholders share a portion of the required reserve tax. Required reserves changes are partially predicted by investors, and increases and decreases in required reserve rates have an asymmetric effect on stock returns. In addition, large and public banks bear a larger share of the tax, and the remuneration of reserves has important implications for the tax burden. Finally, some heterogeneity across banks exists as reflected by differences in the signs and magnitudes of the estimated coefficients
Pass-through del tipo de cambio y política monetaria : evidencia empírica de los países de la OECD( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Spanish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reserve requirements, liquidity risk, and bank lending behavior by Koray Alper( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Although reserve requirements have been used in emerging markets to smooth credit cycles, the exact transmission mechanism remains to be explored. Using bank level data, this study looks inside the black-box to unveil the interaction of reserve requirement policy with bank lending. We identify a new channel that works through a decline in bank liquidity and loan supply due to an increase in reserve requirements. We show that "quantitative tightening" through reserve requirements affect the funding needs and the liquidity position of the banking system. The consequent changes in bank liquidity have a significant impact on the bank lending behavior
Controlling capital? Legal restrictions and the asset composition of international financial flows by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Legal restrictions on international capital movements are imposed in many countries in an attempt to (partially) insulate their economies from abroad and pursue some degree of domestic policy independence. But is the imposition of capital controls effective in achieving these goals? We investigate this issue from a new angle by linking de jure restrictions on three specific asset categories of outflows and inflows with the corresponding component of capital flows. The analysis is based on a novel panel data set of capital controls data, disaggregated by asset class and by inflows/outflows, and covering 74 countries during 1995-2005. Using panel LSDV regressions, and including a host of well-known determinants of capital flows, we estimate a model of capital flows with four categories: equity-like flows (including FDI) and debt for both capital inflows and capital outflows. The estimated effects of capital controls vary markedly with the type of controls imposed: they are binding on capital outflows (debt, equity and FDI); have no apparent effect on capital inflows of various types; and are less effective in low and middle-income countries. Moreover, there are no apparent substitution effects so that controls on debt and equity outflows change the volume and composition of capital flows as well as the net flow of capital in each asset class. The large differences across asset categories in the effects of capital controls suggest that the common use of aggregate capital control indicators can be misleading
Exchange rate equations based on interest rate rules : in-sample and out-of-sample performance by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using exchange rate data on five currencies vis-à-vis the US dollar, this paper examines the in-sample and out-of-sample performance of exchange rate equations derived from alternative empirical and optimal interest rate rules. These rules could have either homogeneous or heterogeneous response coefficients. Our exercise shows that these exchange rate equations do not offer good in-sample explanatory power consistently across currencies and over time. The relative forecasting performance of these exchange rate equations tend to vary across currencies and over time and bears limited relationship with the relative in-sample performance. When the forecast performance is compared with a random walk model, these exchange rate equations offer no better performance under the usual MSFE criterion but are better when the ability of predicting the direction of change is considered
Trade openness, market competition, and inflation : some sectoral evidence from OECD countries by Mahir Binici( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This study evaluates the role market competition plays in determining inflation based on sector-level data from OECD countries. In theory, trade openness can affect inflation through changes in market competitiveness and productivity. Nonetheless, previous empirical studies often fail to account for productivity effects, and their results may overstate the role of market competition. This study shows that inflation decreases with greater market competitiveness even after controlling for productivity effects. Indeed, when market competition and productivity effects are both accounted for, trade openness becomes insignificant in explaining inflation. The results support that changes in market competitiveness and productivity are the main channels through which trade openness affects inflation."--Editor
 
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