WorldCat Identities

Clarke, Colin P.

Overview
Works: 24 works in 98 publications in 1 language and 11,969 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  History  Bibliography  Handbooks and manuals  Sources 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Colin P Clarke
Terrorism, inc. : the financing of terrorism, insurgency, and irregular warfare by Colin P Clarke( Book )

5 editions published in 2015 in English and Undetermined and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book will analyze seven terrorist and insurgent groups to determine how these groups fund their organizations, the various ways in which funding supports their operational and organizational principles, and how this funding could be disrupted." (p. VIII)
The challenge of violent drug-trafficking organizations : an assessment of Mexican security based on existing RAND research on urban unrest, insurgency, and defense-sector reform by Christopher Paul( Book )

8 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 141 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Violent drug-trafficking organizations (VDTOs) in Mexico produce, transport, and deliver into the United States tens of billions of dollars worth of narcotics annually, but their activities are not limited to drug trafficking. VDTOs have also engaged in human trafficking, weapon trafficking, kidnapping, money laundering, extortion, bribery, racketeering, and assassinations. In an effort to clarify the scope and details of the challenges posed by VDTOs, a RAND team conducted a Delphi expert elicitation exercise, the results of which offer an assessment of the contemporary security situation in Mexico through the lens of existing RAND research on related issues. The exercise centered around three strands of prior RAND research on urban instability and unrest, historical insurgencies, and defense-sector reform. Although this prior research was not designed specifically for the study of Mexico, all three areas offer applicable insights. Assessment scorecards from these projects were used to obtain input from the expert panel and to guide the resulting discussion. The goal was not to break significant new ground in understanding the dynamics of drug violence in Mexico or to offer a qualitative assessment of these dynamics, but rather to provide an empirically based platform for identifying key areas that merit further investigation
Victory has a thousand fathers : detailed counterinsurgency case studies by Christopher Paul( Book )

14 editions published in 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 141 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This monograph presents detailed case histories for each of the COIN [counterinsurgency] campaigns examined in the analysis. A companion volume, Victory Has a Thousand Fathers: Sources of Success in Counterinsurgency, describes the qualitative comparative approach, presents findings from the overall analyses, and explains the study's case selection and methodology in more detail. It also presents an overview and in-depth assessments of the key approaches, practices, and factors that feature prominently in successful COIN operations. The full case data can be downloaded at http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG964/." --P. iii
Victory has a thousand fathers : sources of success in counterinsurgency by Christopher Paul( Book )

11 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This monograph describes the qualitative comparative approach, presents findings from the overall analyses, and explains the study's case selection and methodology. It also presents an overview and in-depth assessments of the key approaches, practices, and factors that feature prominentlyin successful COIN operations. A companion volume, Victory Has a Thousand Fathers: Detailed Counterinsurgency Case Studies, includes detailed case histories for each of the COIN campaigns examined in the analyses. The full case data can be downloaded at http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/MG964 ."--Page iii
Mexico is not Colombia : alternative historical analogies for responding to the challenge of violent drug-trafficking organizations by Christopher Paul( Book )

16 editions published in 2014 in English and Undetermined and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Despite the scope of the threat they pose to Mexico's security, violent drug-trafficking organizations are not well understood, and optimal strategies to combat them have not been identified. While there is no perfectly analogous case to Mexico's current security situation, historical case studies may offer lessons for policymakers as they cope with challenges related to violence and corruption in that country
Paths to victory : lessons from modern insurgencies by Christopher Paul( Book )

4 editions published between 2009 and 2013 in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When a country is threatened by an insurgency, what efforts give its government the best chance of prevailing? Contemporary discourse on this subject is voluminous and often contentious. Advice for the counterinsurgent is often based on little more than common sense, a general understanding of history, or a handful of detailed examples, instead of a solid, systematically collected body of historical evidence. A 2010 RAND study challenged this trend with rigorous analyses of all 30 insurgencies that started and ended between 1978 and 2008. This update to that original study expanded the data set, adding 41 new cases and comparing all 71 insurgencies begun and completed worldwide since World War II. With many more cases to compare, the study was able to more rigorously test the previous findings and address critical questions that the earlier study could not. For example, it could examine the approaches that led counterinsurgency forces to prevail when an external actor was involved in the conflict. It was also able to address questions about timing and duration, such as which factors affect the duration of insurgencies and the durability of the resulting peace, as well as how long historical counterinsurgency forces had to engage in effective practices before they won
From stalemate to settlement : lessons for Afghanistan from historical insurgencies that have been resolved through negotiations by Colin P Clarke( Book )

11 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In June 2013, the Afghan Taliban opened a political office in Qatar to facilitate peace talks with the U.S. and Afghan governments. Negotiations between the United States and the group that sheltered al-Qaeda would have been unthinkable 12 years ago, but the reality is that a negotiated settlement in Afghanistan is one of several possible end games under the current U.S. withdrawal plan. Negotiating an end to an insurgency can be a long and arduous process beset by false starts and continued violence, but a comprehensive review of historical cases that ended in settlement shows that these negotiations followed a similar path that can be generalized into a "master narrative." This research examines 13 historical cases of insurgencies that were resolved through negotiated settlement in which neither side (insurgents or counterinsurgents) unambiguously prevailed. Taken together, these cases reveal that the path to negotiated settlement generally proceeds in seven steps in a common sequence. Although this resulting master narrative does not necessarily conform precisely to every conflict brought to resolution through negotiation, it can serve as an important tool to guide the progress of a similar approach to resolving the conflict in Afghanistan as U.S. forces prepare to withdraw
Paths to victory : detailed insurgency case studies by Christopher Paul( Book )

3 editions published between 2005 and 2013 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In-depth case studies of 41 insurgencies since World War II provide evidence to answer a perennial question in strategic discussions of counterinsurgency: When a country is threatened by an insurgency, what efforts give its government the best chance of prevailing? Each case study breaks the conflict into phases and examines the factors and practices that led to the outcome (insurgent win, counterinsurgent win, or a mixed outcome favoring one side or the other). Detailed analyses of the cases, supplemented by data on 30 previously conducted insurgency case studies (and thus covering all 71 historical insurgencies worldwide since World War II), can be found in the companion volume, Paths to Victory: Lessons from Modern Insurgencies. Collectively, the 71 cases span a vast geographic range (South America, Africa, the Balkans, Central Asia, and the Far East) and include examples of governments that attempted to fight the tide of history -- that is, to quell an anticolonial rebellion or uprisings against apartheid
Counterinsurgency scorecard : Afghanistan in early 2013 relative to insurgencies since World War II by Christopher Paul( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The RAND report Paths to Victory: Lessons from Modern Insurgencies added 41 new cases to a previously studied set of 30 insurgencies, examining the 71 insurgencies begun and completed worldwide between World War II and 2008 to analyze correlates of success in counterinsurgency (COIN). A key finding of this research was that a case's score on a scorecard of 15 equally weighted good and 11 equally weighted bad COIN factors and practices perfectly discriminated the outcomes of the cases analyzed. That is, the balance of good and bad factors and practices correlated with either a COIN win (insurgency loss) or a COIN loss (insurgency win) in the overall case. Using the scorecard approach as its foundation, a RAND study sought to apply the findings to the case of Afghanistan in early 2013. The effort involved an expert elicitation, or Delphi exercise, in which experts were asked to make "worst-case" assessments of the factors to complete the scorecard for ongoing operations in Afghanistan. The consensus results revealed that early 2013 Afghanistan ranks among the historical COIN winners, but its score is equal to those of the lowest-scoring historical wins. This tenuous position points to several areas in need of improvement, but particularly the need to disrupt the flow of insurgent support and the need for the Afghan government and Afghan security forces to better demonstrate their commitment and motivation. Afghanistan in early 2011 scored in the middle of the historical record in terms of COIN wins and losses, suggesting an overall improvement in COIN progress in that conflict by early 2013. However, conditions may change as coalition forces prepare to hand over responsibility for the country's security to the Afghan government and Afghan security forces in 2014
Assessing and evaluating Department of Defense efforts to inform, influence, and persuade : handbook for practitioners by Christopher Paul( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"To achieve key national security objectives, the U.S. government and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) must communicate effectively and credibly with a broad range of foreign audiences. DoD spends more than 250 million per year on inform, influence, and persuade (IIP) efforts, but how effective (and cost-effective) are they? How well do they support military objectives? Could some of them be improved? If so, how? DoD has struggled with assessing the progress and effectiveness of its IIP efforts and in presenting the results of these assessments to stakeholders and decisionmakers. To address these challenges, a RAND study compiled examples of strong assessment practices across sectors, including defense, marketing, public relations, and academia, distilling and synthesizing insights and advice for the assessment of DoD IIP efforts and programs. This handbook was designed to be an easy-to-navigate, quick-reference guide to planning and conducting assessments of DoD IIP efforts, analyzing the data generated, and presenting the results. It also offers some background on current assessment practices in DoD and the typical users and uses of DoD IIP assessment results. A companion volume, Assessing and Evaluating Department of Defense Efforts to Inform, Influence, and Persuade: Desk Reference, offers a more detailed exploration and additional examples of assessment in practice."--Back cover
Assessing and evaluating Department of Defense efforts to inform, influence, and persuade : an annotated reading list by Christopher Paul( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has struggled to assess the progress and effectiveness of its efforts to inform, influence, and persuade audiences in support of key national security objectives. One reason is that it lacks personnel with sufficient expertise in assessment and evaluation. Although the department is making an effort to infuse sound assessment principles in doctrine and to expand assessment-related course offerings in the military-academic sector, these efforts will take time to bear fruit. These temporary shortfalls extend to the evaluation and assessment of DoD efforts to inform, influence, and persuade. To help fill the gap, RAND produced a reading list for self-study in best assessment practices across a range of sectors. The reading list has two purposes: to provide resources for new assessment personnel to cement and broaden their assessment and evaluation expertise and to serve as a general list of assessment resources that can be made available to assessment stakeholders to improve their assessment expertise. It supplements two companion volumes, Assessing and Evaluating Department of Defense Efforts to Inform, Influence, and Persuade: Desk Reference and Assessing and Evaluating Department of Defense Efforts to Inform, Influence, and Persuade: Handbook for Practitioners
Counterinsurgency Scorecard Update : Afghanistan in Early 2015 Relative to Insurgencies Since World War II by Christopher Paul( Book )

3 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Previous RAND research examined 71 insurgencies begun and completed worldwide between World War II and 2010 to analyze correlates of success in counterinsurgency (COIN). A key finding was that a case's score on a scorecard of 15 equally weighted good and 11 equally weighted bad COIN factors and practices corresponded perfectly with the outcomes of the cases analyzed. That is, the balance of good and bad factors and practices was always positive when the outcome was a COIN win (insurgent loss) and always negative when the outcome was a COIN loss (insurgent win). Using the scorecard approach as its foundation, a RAND study sought to apply the findings to the case of Afghanistan in 2015. The effort involved an expert elicitation in which experts were asked to make "worst-case" assessments of the factors to complete the scorecard for ongoing operations in Afghanistan. It was the third Afghanistan-focused exercise conducted with the scorecard, allowing rough comparisons with scores assigned by expert panels in 2011 and 2013. The 2015 consensus results indicated that Afghanistan continues to have a positive score, though its score is tied with the lowest-scoring historical wins. Two factors remained absent in Afghanistan in 2015 but essential to success in historical COIN campaigns: disrupting flows of tangible support to the insurgents and a demonstration (and improvement) of commitment and motivation on the part of the Afghan National Security Forces, the primary COIN force since the coalition drawdown. Despite some potentially positive developments resulting from the 2014 election of a new government in Afghanistan, it appears that the most promising end to the conflict will be a negotiated settlement in which the Afghan government makes some concessions to the insurgents and in which external powers, including the United States and Pakistan, help broker a satisfactory power-sharing agreement that brings greater stability to the country"--Publisher's description
Praeger security international : terrorism, homeland security, strategy( )

in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents comprehensive information and unique insights into the international security issues that play a key role in defining our world's identity in the 21st century. Treats critical topics such as arms control, defense and national security, energy security, cyber conflict, counterinsurgency, and terrorism. Offers varied international perspectives and reflections from psychologists, diplomats, first responders, economists, journalists, civil servants, war-fighters, legal experts
Tactical Cyber : Building a Strategy for Cyber Support to Corps and Below by Isaac Porche( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"RAND Arroyo Center was asked by U.S. Army Cyber Command's G35 office to develop and document an Army strategy for providing cyber support to corps and below, which is synonymous with tactical cyber operations. This report describes how the Army should use available resources to achieve the mission objectives inherent to tactical cyber operations. Cyber operations are increasingly important to the Army and other services' ability to seamlessly incorporate actions in cyberspace with activities in traditional warfighting domains (land, air, maritime, and space). This report proposes a strategy for tactical Army cyber operations, enumerating overarching goals, objectives, and associated activities. As part of this strategy, the authors describe what the Army, as an institution, needs to do to realize a vision for tactical cyber operations. In addition, this report discusses the incorporation and use of offensive cyber operations, specifically at the tactical level."--Publisher's description
Financial futures of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant : findings from a RAND corporation workshop by Colin P Clarke( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In June 2016, RAND held a small workshop on Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) finances. Participants in the workshop included professionals with expertise in the Middle East, ISIL, counterterrorism, and economics. This report describes the likely evolution of ISIL finances under three specific scenarios: a continuation of the current campaign, a negotiated settlement in Syria and political accommodation in Iraq, and military victory without negotiated settlement or political accommodation. The discussion of potential consequences for ISIL across these three contrasting scenarios offered a number of implications for the counter-ISIL effort. These included taking actions to counter specific means of raising money within ISIL territory, using financial information to damage the group, degrading its ability to raise money across its territory, and ensuring that it does not shift to raising money from beyond its territory"--Publisher's description
Alert and ready : an organizational design assessment of Marine Corps intelligence by Christopher Paul( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) has grown in strength, it has needed to add intelligence capabilities. Since the end of the Cold War and, especially, since September 11, 2001, USMC intelligence has had to tailor its organization to meet the evolving demands of the operational environment. This has resulted in a number of ad hoc arrangements, practices, and organizations. A broad review of the organizational design of the USMC intelligence enterprise examined how to align it efficiently and effectively with current and future missions and functions. Specifically, the review, which included interviews with a range of USMC personnel and civilians, considered the organization of (and possible improvements to) the Intelligence Department, the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity, the intelligence organizations within the Marine Expeditionary Forces (specifically, the intelligence and radio battalions), and intelligence structures in the combat elements. A comparison of 48 organizational and functional issues with a series of USMC intelligence and functional issues resulted in a series of recommendations to help improve the ⁰́fit⁰́₊ of USMC intelligence organizations with their environmental context. In some cases, the service would benefit not from changing its intelligence structure but by realigning it; in other areas, restructuring would lend greater efficiency and effectiveness to the USMC intelligence enterprise
What works best when building partner capacity and under what circumstances? by Christopher Paul( Book )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The United States has a long history of helping other nations develop and improve their military and other security forces. However, changing economic realities and the ongoing reductions in overall defense spending related to the end of more than a decade of war will affect the funding available for these initiatives. How can the U.S. Department of Defense increase the effectiveness of its efforts to build partner capacity while also increasing the efficiency of those efforts? And what can the history of U.S. efforts to build partner capacity reveal about which approaches are likely to be more or less effective under different circumstances? To tackle these complex questions and form a base of evidence to inform policy discussions and investment decisions, a RAND study collected and compared 20 years of data on 29 historical case studies of U.S. involvement in building partner capacity. In the process, it tested a series of validating factors and hypotheses (many of which are rooted in ⁰́common knowledge⁰́₊) to determine how they stand up to real-world case examples of partner capacity building. The results reveal nuances in outcomes and context, pointing to solutions and recommendations to increase the effectiveness of current and future U.S. initiatives to forge better relationships, improve the security and stability of partner countries, and meet U.S. policy and security objectives worldwide
Assessing and evaluating Department of Defense efforts to inform, influence, and persuade : desk reference by Christopher Paul( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

To achieve key national security objectives, the U.S. government and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) must communicate effectively and credibly with a broad range of foreign audiences. DoD spends more than 2 50 million per year on inform, influence, and persuade (IIP) efforts, but how effective (and cost-effective) are they? How well do they support military objectives? Could some of them be improved? If so, how? It can be difficult to measure changes in audience behavior and attitudes, and it can take a great deal of time for DoD IIP efforts to have an impact. DoD has struggled with assessing the progress and effectiveness of its IIP efforts and in presenting the results of these assessments to stakeholders and decisionmakers. To address these challenges, a RAND study compiled examples of strong assessment practices across sectors, including defense, marketing, public relations, and academia, distilling and synthesizing insights and advice for the assessment of DoD IIP efforts and programs. These insights and attendant best practices will be useful to personnel who plan and assess DoD IIP efforts and those who make decisions based on assessments, particularly those in DoD and Congress who are responsible for setting national defense priorities and allocating the necessary resources. In addition to identifying where and why efforts have been successful, assessment can help detect imminent program failure early on, saving precious time and resources. An accompanying volume, Assessing and Evaluating Department of Defense Efforts to Inform, Influence, and Persuade: Handbook for Practitioners, offers a quick-reference guide to the best practices presented here for personnel responsible for planning, executing, and assessing DoD IIP efforts
Victory has a thousand fathers : evidence of effective approaches to counterinsurgency, 1978-2008 by Christopher Paul( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contemporary discourse on counterinsurgency is voluminous and often contentious, but to date there has been a dearth of systematic evidence supporting the various counterinsurgency (COIN) approaches advocated by various discussants. This analysis is based on all insurgencies worldwide begun and concluded between 1978 and 2008; 30 insurgencies in total. Among other things, the analysis offers strong support for 13 commonly offered approaches to COIN, and strong evidence against three. Further, the data show that good COIN practices tend to 'run in packs' and that the balance of selected good and bad practices perfectly predicts insurgency outcomes. Data confirm the importance of popular support, but show that the ability to interdict tangible support (such as new personnel, materiel, and financing) is the single best predictor of COIN force success
The Terrorist Diaspora : After the Fall of the Caliphate by Colin P Clarke( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Testimony presented before the House Homeland Security Committee Task Force on Denying Terrorists Entry into the United States on July 13, 2017."
 
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Victory has a thousand fathers : sources of success in counterinsurgency
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Victory has a thousand fathers : sources of success in counterinsurgency