WorldCat Identities

Linder, Chris

Overview
Works: 18 works in 23 publications in 1 language and 734 library holdings
Genres: Documentary films  Science films  Nonfiction films  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Photographer
Classifications: G590, 910.911
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Chris Linder
Science on ice : four polar expeditions by Chris Linder( Book )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 328 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An oceanographer and award-winning photographer, Linder chronicles four polar expeditions in this richly illustrated volume: to a teeming colony of Adľie penguins, through the icy waters of the Bering Sea in spring, beneath the pack ice of the eastern Arctic Ocean, and over the lake-studded surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Antarctic edge : 70° south( Visual )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 246 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Follows a team of scientists as they explore the West Antarctic Peninsula. In the wake of devastating events like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina, oceanographer Oscar Schofield teams up with a group of researchers in a race to understand the climate change in the fastest warming place on earth
Rise up! : activism as education( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 144 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oceans alive 2006( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents entire three lectures of the Woods Hole Oceans Alive series for 2006
A critical narrative analysis : white student leaders in alternative break programs by Scott Michael Brown( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this qualitative research study was to understand in what ways white student leaders experience race and privilege in critical co-curricular service-learning programs. Participants of this study included white undergraduate students in Alternative Break leadership positions. Critical whiteness and hermeneutic phenomenology provided a framework for exploring whiteness in Alternative Break programs. Through two rounds of interviews, eight participants shared stories of their lived experiences revealing three themes. The findings of this study indicate three themes including, (1) recognition of racial privileges, (2) an uncritical examination of whiteness beyond naming privileges, and (3) a charity over social change paradigm to service. This study seeks to add to the body of literature around whiteness and co-curricular service-learning programs (i.e., Alternative Breaks), and serve as a resource for college administrators working with students and community members
Black graduate women's self-defining process using media and sista circle methodology by Marvette Censarray Ciara Lacy( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to explore how Black women on college campuses make meaning of media representations of themselves and how that meaning impacts how the women define themselves. I used sista circle methodology through an Endarkend Feminist lens for this study. Black women in this study made meaning of self by interpreting, implementing, and interrogating messages received from family, particularly mother figures, Black women on television, and from their Christian socialization. Additionally, I found that Black women self-sacrifice and create space for themselves where that space has not previously existed. Educators can take intentional efforts to recognize and acknowledge the work that has already been done by women. One example is providing and maintaining mentoring opportunities. Educators in graduate programs can encourage Black women to utilize research designs that are more in line with their researcher's perspective. Finally, educators utilize more partnerships between graduate programs, graduate student organizations, and health services to provide more intentional and high impact initiatives to address the needs of Black graduate women at PWIs
Professional perspectives : exploring how student affairs professionals approach working with students of color by Jason Richard Fitzer( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nine student affairs professionals shared stories of working with students of color in various higher education environments, and the challenges associated with their work. Critical race theory was used as the theoretical framework for this study, along with a narrative inquiry methodology. Participants shared their stories through two interviews, and the sharing of an artifact that symbolized their approach to working with students of color. The stories shared by the participants revealed insight about how they approached their work with students of color and what informed their approaches. The various approaches shared by the participants included attending student events and advocating for students to senior administrators. Mentoring and supporting relationships proved to be significant to the majority of participants in the study, offering guidance to the participant's approaches. These relationships also helped the participants decide to pursue careers in student affairs. The findings of this study suggest that narratives can lead to a greater understanding of how student professionals of color work to support students of color within their institutional environments. Utilizing their narratives, senior university administrators can make time for student affairs professionals to share their stories, to better understand their identities and needs as they work with students of color. Professionals of color need support, which can be provided through communities composed of other professionals of color. Further, it is important for White student affairs professionals to be engaged in supporting professionals of color in the dismantling oppression. White professionals must also be equipped to engage with students of color. The role of higher education and student affairs graduate programs should also be explored as an area for future research, to consider different ways that student affairs professionals can receive knowledge and skills to support them in their work with students of color
"Dear higher education, there are sex workers on your campus" : rendering visible the realities of U.S. college students engaged in sex work by Terah J Stewart( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to explore the realities of U.S. college students engaged in sex work. Specifically, I focused on motivations, histories, how social identity in relation to power informed their sex worker experience, what/how they were learning as a result of sex work, and what college and university leaders could do to support them. I focused on college student sex workers with racially and sexually minoritized identities. I used a genre-blurred critical narrative inquiry that combined aspects of the biographical genre (life history) and the art-based genre (creative non-fiction). Intersectionality (Crenshaw, 1991) and the polymorphous paradigm (Weizter, 2010) served as the theoretical framework for the inquiry and the Listening Guide (Gilligan, 2015) served as my analysis process. I developed six key findings including: critical differences between student sex workers with minoritized racial and sexual identities and those with dominant social identities, queer (in)visibility as it relates to their sex work, a lack of trust in college/university administrators, a lack of their ability to imagine how institutional leaders could (or would) support them; a clarity of: power and dominance, the violence of men, and a development of their overall confidence. I offer a discussion of the findings, implications, and future directions for this area of research and inquiry
Beyond the game : engaging student-athletes around social justice issues by Courtney Allison Gay( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the current climate of renewed college student activism, athletic administrators have grappled with how to respond to student-athletes' engagement around social justice issues. While sport has long been a platform utilized to highlight social issues and bring about social change, many athletic administrators have responded to student-athletes' engagement around social justice issues by focusing on minimizing disruption and avoiding conflict and controversy; some have even sought to discourage student-athletes from speaking out on social issues. In contrast, other athletic administrators have recognized student-athletes' engagement around social justice issues as an opportunity for student learning and development. As such, the purpose of this instrumental case study was to explore the environmental and organizational conditions that fostered the creation of an educational leadership program in an NCAA Division I athletic department in the effort to engage student-athletes around racial justice, diversity, and inclusion. Key findings of this case study included the identification of contextual elements and an alignment with institutional values and culture as key environmental conditions and organizational characteristics that shaped the institution's ability to create and implement the program. Student-athletes' participation in the program resulted in several learning outcomes including the development of their reflective, empathy, and perspective-taking skills, enhancement of their understanding of the power of their athletic platform, improvement of their cultural competency, and preparation to engage in critical conversations. Additionally, the program helped foster a stronger sense of community among student-athletes and encouraged them to seek connections beyond the athletic realm
Exploring the ways in which students from low socioeconomic backgrounds experience a sense of belonging at elite institutions by Honi Faith Migdol( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Institutions of higher learning have a distinct responsibility of serving and supporting the varied needs of their admitted students. In recent years, elite institutions have offered generous financial aid packages and expanded their recruitment efforts to diversify their enrollment and increase access to students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. However, a wealth of research indicates that students from low socioeconomic backgrounds face unique social challenges at elite institutions as they experience a dissonance in their experiences from their affluent peers (Aries, 2008). Once enrolled among privileged peers, economically challenged students at elite institutions may experience feelings of exclusion or lack of belonging (Ostrove, 2007). Grounded in Strayhorn's (2012) Model of College Students' Sense of Belonging and approached from a constructivist paradigm using narrative inquiry, this qualitative study explores the ways in which students from low socioeconomic backgrounds experience a sense of belonging at elite institutions. The seven participants of this study were currently enrolled undergraduate students at a small, private, residential, elite institution situated in a rural setting in the Southeast. Through two individual interviews and a photo elicitation exercise, the students shared the ways in which they experienced a sense of belonging at their institution. The findings were categorized into two themes: Campus Experiences (including representations of affluence, both on campus and from their peers, unanticipated campus costs, campus involvement, and their social integration and relationships with peers) and Social Class Identity Formation and Reconciliation (awareness of their own socioeconomic status, their attitudes towards money, value formation, and familial and cultural influence). Each of the experiences they shared painted a picture of the ways in which they experienced a sense of belonging at their institution and provided implications for practice for higher education administrators in creating inclusive communities for all students
I am my brother's keeper : a narrative perspective of the lived experiences of Black men professionals in student affairs who mentor undergraduate black men during the Black Lives Matter era by Demetrius Douglas Smith( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this qualitative study was to share the lived experiences of Black men professionals in student affairs who mentor undergraduate Black men. This study analyzed the understanding of Black men providing this level of mentorship during the Black Lives Matter era. Very few academic scholars have researched the lived experiences of Black men professionals in student affairs. This research study provides some answers and increases the knowledge for the field of higher education and student affairs when it comes to the perception of Black men professionals working in student affairs. In this study, the intent was to be as vivid as possible in describing the daily experience of these Black men and provide platform for them. The goal of this study explores the stories of Black men and provides an opportunity for them to be unapologetically honest about their experiences. Six Black men professionals in student affairs who mentor undergraduate Black men shared their stories of their overall experience inside and outside of the workplace. The participants described their experiences of mentoring undergraduate Black men in a society where Black Lives Matter is an unavoidable topic. The participants in this research study describe their experiences of enduring microaggressions in the workplace, police brutality encounters, and providing support for undergraduate Black men during the BLM era. Participants answered semi- structured interview questions developed to obtain authentic and personal details of the participants' lives. Conducting photo elicitation provided participants an opportunity to use their creativity to describe their experiences as well. Several themes developed after conducting research for the study. After completing this study, the field of higher education has a better understanding of the lived experiences of Black men professionals in student affairs. During this Black Lives Matter era, Black men endure a lot of challenges inside and outside of the workplace. In a world where it seems as if society does not value Black lives, participants in this provide detailed perspectives on their experiences when it comes to police brutality to workplace discrimination. Higher education and student affairs has a long way to go when it comes to ensuring a true sense of belonging for Black men professionals in student affairs. This study is a concerted effort to bring awareness, create dialog, develop action plans, and eventual change in the field of higher education
Motivating factors impacting black men's pursuit of a doctoral degree in education by Justin Owen Grimes( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Black men historically in graduate education have endured issues of racial indignity, hostile classroom environments, microaggressions, and questioning of intellectual ability, which subsequently have a negative effect on doctoral enrollment (Baker, 2005; Gasman et al., 2008; Martin et al., 2007). Not only do Black men in doctoral programs undergo acts of racism in their educational experiences; they seemingly operate in educational spaces where their presence is not welcome at certain institutions (Gasman et al., 2008; Harper & Davis, 2012; Pope, 2013). What is more important, is how historical educational policies and practices embedded in racism, have created structures that fail to adequately address how access and preparedness for graduate programs, exclude the challenges Black men have faced throughout their educational socialization. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to elicit Black men in doctoral programs voices through photos using photo elicitation, this study uses counter-narratives, one of the tenants of Critical Race Theory (CRT), to narrate Black male doctoral students' process of examining factors that contribute to their choice of pursuing a doctoral degree at a Historically White Institution (HWI) from participant's elicited photos and semi-structured interviews. The second purpose is to provide educators more knowledge on how race, racism, and gender impact Black men's motivation throughout the educational journey. Lastly, this research will offer strategies to better support Black men by knowing who and what motivates them to pursue doctorates in education. Being that institutions aim to provide services that will help all students process difficult transitions and issues, they should work to reinforce messages valuing Black men's worth on college campuses (Baker, 2005; Gasman et al, 2012; Martin et al., 2007; Pope, 2013)
Autoethnography of a working professional, mother, student, person of color/other, foreign-born national : exploring the intersectionality of multiple identity roles by Catherine Tungol Binuya( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Persistence and integration of an individual depends on the individual's characteristics and motivation, available and accessible levels of support, and congruence with cultural values, behaviors, and expectations. This autoethnographic study reflects the analysis of the intersectionality of multiple identities as a working professional, mother, student, person of color/Other, foreign-born national across the cultural environments of work, home, and school as I pursue an online doctoral program in education in the United States. Taken from a post-modernist, post-structuralist lens, this research examines the axiology of personal truths to reflect on systematic inequalities experienced as gender-based and racial discrimination and oppression in the context of culture. This research explores the theme of the influence of ethnic cultural roots and internalized values of families of origin on the contextual development and expression of multiple identities. Tinto's Student Integration Model (SIM) serves as a starting point to problematize integration models based on dominant cultural characteristics that perpetuate White, male privilege. This research advocates for a more multi-culturally inclusive integration processes that address marginalized group identity membership, challenges the model minority myth, and work-life balance. Theory-to-practice takeaways are offered for administrators for implementation to improve workplace environments
Temperatures from Yellowstone Lake vents hit new high by Brett French( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The amount of heat flowing out of hydrothermal vents in the floor of Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park appear to be much higher than previously thought
Social innovation in higher education : a case study by Ambra Ann Yarbrough( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

I categorized the research findings through four thematic categories: Change, Individual Values, Group Values, and Community Values. Many parallels exist between the language used within the field of social innovation and the Social Change Model of Leadership Development, along with conversations about the development of personal and social responsibility within college. Through a case study examination, five key findings illuminate lessons that administrators need to know about infusing social innovation into student affairs and higher education. They include fostering means to identify social needs on campus, developing a collaborative culture, cultivating leadership among all levels of the university, recognizing the process takes time, and generating and integrating scholarship to complement practice
The stool must not touch the ground : student and community affairs at a liberal arts university in Ghana, West Africa by Jillian Antoine Martin( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore student and community affairs as conceptualized and enacted by the staff members of the Office of Student and Community Affairs (OSCA) at Ashesi University in Ghana, West Africa. The mission of Ashesi University, founded in 2002, was to inspire the next generation of ethical, entrepreneurial leaders for and from the continent of Africa (Ashesi Overview, 2015). At Ashesi the OSCA staff supports this bold academic mission and facilitates students' critical thinking, communication, and leadership skills (Student Life, n.d.). Three research questions guided this study: (a) How do the staff members of the Office of Student and Community Affairs conceptualize student and community affairs?; (b)What strategies do the staff members of the Office of Student and Community Affairs employ to enact student and community affairs?;and (c) How do other university constituents (faculty, students, administrators, and alumni) perceive student and community affairs at Ashesi University? I represent the findings of this study as proverbs corresponding to sections of the Ashesi University logo. The central finding of this study was that student and community affairs were conceptualized and enacted in line with the mission of Ashesi to inspire the next generation of leaders. Implications from this study and other areas of future research are presented
Experience and persistence of campus sexual assault investigators by Jonathan Richard Duke( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The 2011 Dear Colleague Letter (U.S. Department of Education, 2011) sparked a change in how staff in higher education managed sexual misconduct cases. In many institutions student affairs trained professionals became campus sexual assault investigators. Most investigators entered the new role with little or no training in understanding their response to secondary trauma. This phenomenological study focused on the experience of nine student affairs trained professionals in a campus sexual assault investigator role, and how those professionals experienced their response to secondary trauma. The researcher used a framework of vicarious trauma to understand the participants' responses to secondary trauma, how their various training programs prepared them to understand their response, if at all, and how they persisted as investigators. The results of the study include suggestions for preparing professionals exposed to secondary trauma, ways to support professionals experience vicarious trauma or other secondary traumatic responses, and an understanding of a cycle of self-care for campus sexual assault investigators
The experiences of multiracial and biracial women senior and mid-level administrators in higher education by Judith Mary Pannell( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

During the past 20 years, the number of women students, administrators, and faculty of color in higher education has increased (King & Gomez, 2008). Despite the increase, multiracial and biracial women remain underrepresented in senior leadership positions within higher education (Aguirre, 2000). To support multi/biracial women as they advance into senior leadership positions, higher education administrators must have a better understanding of their unique experiences. Research is one tool that can help administrators as they strive to support and promote multi/biracial women and create inclusive campus environments. Although research in higher education to date has explored the experiences of women of color in higher education (i.e., Nixon, 2016), there is limited research on the specific experiences of biracial and multiracial women higher education administrators. As a result, the existing research fails to represent and address the specific concerns and experiences of multi/biracial women in senior and mid-level administrative positions. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the unique experiences of multiracial and biracial women so that higher education administrators can create strategies that transform existing policy and practices, and if necessary create new structures and systems to better support and promote multi/biracial women administrators. Grounded in Critical Race Feminism (Wing, 2003) and approached through a transformative paradigm using semi-structured interviews, this phenomenological study explored the experiences of multiracial and biracial women in senior and mid-level administrative positions within higher education. Participants for this study included nine individuals who self-identified as multiracial or biracial women in a senior or mid-level administrative position within a U.S. institution of higher education. Through semi-structured interviews, the participants shared their experiences as multi/biracial women in the workplace. The themes that emerged from the interviews include the saliency of race, experiences with race and racism, expectations, the impact of racism, challenging systems of oppression, and coping strategies. The broad workplace experiences have far-reaching implications for higher education administrators who seek to understand and support all multi/biracial women in their institutions
 
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Science on ice : four polar expeditions
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