WorldCat Identities

Thomas, Patricia J.

Overview
Works: 80 works in 108 publications in 1 language and 144 library holdings
Genres: Bibliographies  Examinations 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Patricia J Thomas
Navy women in traditional and nontraditional jobs : a comparison of satisfaction, attrition, and reenlistment by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study examined the effects of two organizational structural elements--gender appropriateness of job assignment and mix of women and men in a work group--upon the attitudes and behavior of Navy women. Effects of being assigned to a traditionally feminine or masculine job were examined and related to attrition, satisfaction, and reenlistment. Effects of being in a male-dominated, balanced, or female-dominated work group on satisfaction, expectations, and intentions toward remaining in the Navy were investigated. Samples of about 1000 men and 1000 women who joined the Navy in 1975 were followed throughout their first enrollment. Results showed that gender composition of work group was not related to the dependent measures. Being assigned to a job traditional for members of one's gender or to one that is nontraditional was not related to women's attrition, satisfaction, advancement, or reenlistment. Among men, rates of attrition and advancement were greater and reenlistment rates were lower for those in jobs considered nontraditional for women. Rates of advancement, migration, and completion of the first enlistment showed no gender differences. (Some conclusions are made based on the entire 4 years of the research.) (YLB)
Pregnancy and single parenthood in the Navy : results of a 1997 survey by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The 1997 Navy Survey of Parenthood and Pregnancy consisted of core items from prior versions and new items to investigate current concerns of Navy management. A disproportionate sampling scheme was used to maximize the number of respondents who had become pregnant the previous year. The surveys were mailed directly to 16,000 officer and enlisted women and men, and were answered anonymously. The Navy's annual pregnancy rates parallel civilian rates for age cohorts. Half of the women experiencing an unplanned pregnancy were not using birth control, whereas the pill was the most failure-prone method of contraception. Pregnant women in deployable units had more adverse outcomes than women on shore duty. More enlisted men were single parents in 1997 than 1992. Less than 20% of the single pregnant women received counseling on the help available to them in obtaining financial support from the baby's father. There has been no increase in compliance with the requirement to complete a Family Care Certificate since 1992. The major recommendations were to (1) conduct a perspective longitudinal study comparing the pregnancies of women assigned to sea duty type commands to those of women on shore duty; (2) attempt to reduce unplanned pregnancies by improving birth control education and expanding family planning efforts; and (3) emphasize the importance of the Family Care Certificate and the need to help single pregnant women obtain financial support."--Report documentation page
Role of women in the military : Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotated bibliography of publications on women in the Navy by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The publication dates range from May 1976 to December 1994. Approximately 50 reports and articles are abstracted and indexed by subject area ..."--Report documentation page
The role of recreation in facilitating gender integration in the Navy by Amy Culbertson( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This project was initiated in response to requests from the fleet to provide Navy leadership with tools to facilitate the integration of women throughout the active duty force. This study explored how Navy Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs could assist Navy leaders with this challenge. Research findings from recreation, sports psychology, and past efforts in diversity management shed light on using recreation to facilitate gender integration. Survey data collected from active duty personnel clarify similarities and differences in men's and women's recreation needs. This data also demonstrated how use of Navy MWR fitness centers impacts key individual and organizational outcomes, such as satisfaction with one's life and intentions to remain in the Navy. Data collected on the first aircraft carrier to deploy with both men and women describes a common foundation on which to build integrated fitness programs aboard ship. Experiences at the Naval Academy emphasize the importance of fitness for both the physical and social outcomes it provides. Interviews and expertise from Navy MWR professionals encourage Navy leadership to look to MWR for facilities and programs that encourage team building, unit cohesion, and gender integration among our active duty force. Lastly, recommendations concerning recreation programming for gender integration are offered
Equal opportunity research in the U.S. Military( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sexual harassment in the Marine Corps : results of a 1994 survey by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The purpose of this study was to analyze the sexual harassment items in the Marine Corps Equal Opportunity Survey (MCEOS). This survey was developed and administered to monitor sexual harassment among Marine Corps personnel, along with associated issues. The MCEOS was patterned after the Navy Equal Opportunity/Sexual Harassment (NEOSH) Survey. It was mailed in May 1994 to over 10,000 active duty Marines. Responses were weighted by gender, paygrade, and racial/ethnic group before computing percentages for relevant subgroups. The results are very similar to those obtained with the 1993 NEOSH Survey. Women were sexually harassed more often than men, enlisted more often than officers, Caucasian women more often than Black women, and personnel in the lower paygrades/ranks more often than their seniors. Generalized sexual harassment was more common than harassment targeted at individuals. Perpetrators were most likely to be fellow Marines. Victims of sexual harassment rarely filed a complaint whereas those that did were usually not satisfied with the manner in which it was handled. It was recommended that: (1) the Marine Corps continue to monitor sexual harassment through the administration of the MCEOS biennially; (2) the results of the 1994 MCEOS be used in training; and (3) the source of dissatisfaction with the complaint system be determined." -- Abstract
Women in the Navy( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why Women Enlist The Navy as an Occupational Choice by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As part of a longitudinal research project to investigate attrition among female enlistees, a study was conducted to assess the differences between male and female recruits in background, occupational values, and motivation for enlistment. A sample of 1,000 men and 1,000 women was administered a questionnaire during the early weeks of recruit training. The findings (as discussed and as presented in a series of seven tables in the report) revealed the following: (1) although men and women came from different backgrounds, they enlisted for similar reasons, i.e., to make something of their lives, to acquire education and training, and to travel; (2) men had different occupational values as they were more interested in rewards such as advancement and recognition while women preferred jobs that were people-oriented and altruistic, were located in a clean, cheerful environment, and did not involve machinery or physical risk. It was concluded that the values of many of the women were not consistent with the nontraditional jobs to which they might be assigned. To attract women with compatible values, recommendations were proposed to provide the applicant pool with information about the Navy's utilization of women and to reorient recruiters. (EG)
Women in the military : gender integration at sea by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gender differences in the evaluations of narratives in officer performance ratings by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fitness reports of naval warfare officers : a search for gender differences by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether gender differences are evident in the narrative section of the fitness reports of naval warfare officers. An analysis conducted in 1983 had concluded that women and men officers are not evaluated without regard to gender. The most recent regular fitness reports were obtained for matched samples of women and men surface warfare officers, naval aviators, and naval flight officers. Information was extracted from the narrative section of the reports and content analyzed. Significance tests were conducted of the frequency with which specific descriptors were used in the fitness reports of women and men. The findings indicated that significantly more comments appeared in women's fitness reports than in men's, contrary to the results of the 1983 analysis, due to raters describing personality traits of women more often than they did for men. Women warfare officers were not described with gender-typed words but were said to be dynamic, assertive, and energetic more frequently than were men. Leadership was the only area of performance in which women were rated significantly lower than men. Although, more women than men had the recommended-for-early-promotion box checked, more men were recommended for immediate promotion in the comments. Gender differences favoring women occurred more frequently in the fitness reports of surface warfare officers than in those of the aviation officers. No evidence was found of sexist language in the fitness reports of women warfare officers, but the gender differences in the nature of recommendations and ratings of leadership could negatively affect the careers of women
Preenlistment Drug Experiences of Navy Women and Men A Comparison by Marsha S Olson( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study was to replicate, with female respondents, a 1975 survey of male preservice substance abuse and its correlates. The Navy's Drug Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) was administered in June 1976 to 519 women at Recruit Training Command, Orlando, FL. Responses were compared to those of the 1975 male sample. Results showed that female and male preservice drug experiences were similar. No significant differences were found in the proportions of female and male (49.8 vs. 47.0%, respectively) nondrug users, marijuana-only users (22.2 vs. 25.8%), and other drug users (28.0 vs. 27.2%). Despite the finding that patterns of preservice substance abuse of women and men entering the Navy are similar, it is difficult to predict what effect the enlistment of more women will have on the service's drug problems. Further research with samples of both sexes to determine the extent of substance abuse during the first enlistment is recommended
Analysis of unplanned losses from deploying ships by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study was conducted to investigate the number of pregnancy losses that are incurred by ships in the 6-month period prior to deployment. Additionally, the reasons why some enlisted crew members do not deploy with their ships were determined. Data were extracted from all available Enlisted Manning Inquiry Reports and final Personnel Manning Assistance Reports from deploying gender-integrated surface ships in the Atlantic and Pacific fleets. Since these data are retained for less than 2 years, the sample was limited to 24 ships. Analyses consisted solely of frequencies and percentages. Medical problems and administrative discharges were the most frequent causes of unplanned losses from deploying ships. While pregnancy accounted for 20 percent of the losses, commands were less likely to request a replacement for the woman than when the vacancy occurred for some other reason. Only 8 percent of the non-deploying personnel were pregnant. Seventy-three percent of the personnel who were left behind did not deploy because of disciplinary and medical reasons. Because the documents reviewed for this study are only available as paper copies, and are submitted by all Navy activities (except submarines), it is recommended that an automated system be established
Results of the 1999 Survey of Pregnancy and Single Parenthood in the Navy by Patricia J Thomas( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 1999 Navy Survey of Pregnancy and Parenthood, the fifth in a series, consisted of core items from prior versions and new items to investigate current Navy management concerns. A disproportionate random sampling technique was used for a mail sample and additional surveys were group administered at four sites. Overall, Navy women had lower annual pregnancy rates than their civilian counterparts, except for women 35 and older. Women on shore duty had higher pregnancy rates than women on sea duty. The number of adverse pregnancy outcomes was very low and there were no significant differences in the percentage of adverse outcomes for women based on sea duty, as was the case in 1997. More enlisted men were single parents in 1999 than in 1997. No improvement in compliance with the requirement for paternity counseling has been found since 1997. There has been little improvement in male officers' compliance with the requirement to complete a Family Care Certificate. Almost 80 percent of the pregnancies of officers, but only 40 percent of the pregnancies of enlisted women were planned. Slightly over half of the enlisted women who had an unplanned pregnancy had engaged in unprotected sex. The major recommendations were to emphasize the importance of the Family Care Certificate, especially to male officers; attempt to reduce unplanned pregnancies by improving birth control education for men and women and expanding family planning efforts; emphasize the importance of command support in helping single pregnant women obtain paternal financial support; and explore the reasons women and men feel uncomfortable discussing birth control information with available medical personnel
Impact of pregnant women and single parents upon Navy personnel systems by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Investigation of Possible Test Bias in the Navy Basic Test Battery by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

3 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The research investigated whether racial bias exists in the Navy Basic Test Battery (BTB), used to assign recruits to technical schools. BTB scores and school grades were obtained for approximately 105,000 whites and 2,000 blacks attending A-Schools in 1969-1970. Sufficient numbers of blacks attended 24 schools for statistical analysis of their test scores and standardized school grades. The findings and conclusions were as follows: The means of the white and black samples were significantly different for both the school grade criterion and the predictor tests, with whites scoring higher than blacks on all variables; The regression lines of each race differed significantly. If single BTB tests were used in selection, overprediction of minority performance would be somewhat more common than underprediction. The tests more accurately predicted the grades of white students than of black. The selection composites were valid predictors of the performance of white students in all schools and for black students in half of the school. (Author)
Assessment of sexual harassment in the Navy : results of the 1989 Navy-wide survey by Amy Culbertson( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Absences of Navy enlisted personnel : a search for gender differences by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purposes of this report were to compare the lost time of Navy enlisted women and men and to determine whether single parents lose more time than other personnel. A secondary goal was to replicate a 1978 study of women's and men's absenteeism behavior. Two separate investigations were conducted. The first relied on work diaries that were completed by immediate supervisors at 50 commands and the second consisted of lost time that was recorded in personnel and medical data tapes (as done a decade earlier). Key findings are: (1) No gender difference in lost time was found in ships, aviation squadrons, and 4 of the 7 types of shore commands in the sample. Women lost an average of 17 minutes more a day (62 hours per year) than men in naval stations, naval air stations/ air intermediate maintenance detachments and shore intermediate maintenance activities due to pregnancy and postpartum convalescent leave. (2) Parents lost more time than non-parents in two command types, averaging 11 minutes a day (40 hours per year), to care for the needs of their dependents and for medical reasons. (3) Married personnel lost 10 minutes more a day (37 hours per year) than single personnel in one command and single personnel lost 9 more minutes (33 hours per year) than married personnel in another. (4) Single parents did not have significantly more lost time than married parents. (5) As was found in 1978, men had more recorded days absent than women for disciplinary events. When added to hospitalization, a category where women's rates are higher than men's, the gender difference still was present. (6) Days lost due to disciplinary events are highly related to level of education
Perceptions of Discrimination in Non-Judicial Punishment. TechnicalReport No. 74-22 by Patricia J Thomas( Book )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nonjudicial punishment is frequently the target of racial discrimination in the military because of the discretion permitted those reporting and disciplining violators. This study seeks to determine: (1) whether existing records indicate that nonjudicial punishment is administered without regard to race; and (2) whether blacks and whites perceive discrimination in discipline, job assignments, and opportunity for advancement. A pair of chief personnel-men, one black, one white, boarded over 70 ships on the east and west coasts to search disciplinary records for data and to administer an attitude questionnaire to 324 sets of personnel. Conclusions from the study revealed no significant differences in the treatment of blacks and whites for whom reports were filed. The authors acknowledge that this does not mean that equality of treatment has been established, since there is no way of knowing the number of offenders of each race who were not put on record or were disciplined by their division officers. The item responses and the written comments revealed that, regardless of the data in ships' records, blacks believed they were being discriminated against in the areas of job assignments, discipline, and recommendations for advancement. (Author/PC)
 
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English (40)