WorldCat Identities

Intelligence2

Overview
Works: 158 works in 389 publications in 1 language and 13,321 library holdings
Genres: Internet videos  Educational films  Filmed debates  Conference papers and proceedings  Documentary films  History 
Classifications: PN1997, E
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Intelligence2
Democracy isn't for everyone : a debate( Visual )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 288 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is it reasonable to expect the entire world to adopt democratic ways, or is it wrong to press other countries to embrace a system that-however beneficial it may, in theory, be-is completely at odds with their cultures and traditions? The motion under consideration in this Oxford Union-style debate is "Democracy isn't for everyone." Panelists in favor stress that true democracy is more than merely the holding of elections and therefore must evolve organically out of a society's circumstances, while those against argue that to say democracy isn't for everyone is tantamount to saying that democracy, for some, can never be-a proposition rejected because whatever some people can achieve, all are humanly capable of achieving. Questions from the floor follow. The final vote? Marginally against. Veteran British broadcast journalist Richard Lindley presides. (100 minutes)
Art market is less ethical than the stock market : a debate( Visual )

4 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 280 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the current economic downturn, much attention has been paid to the volatile stock market and efforts to overhaul financial regulations. But there's another market out there that some say is even riskier for potential investors: the art market. Does a lack of oversight permit art dealers to manipulate prices? Or is the value of art not determined by money? Is the art market less ethical than Wall Street? Art insiders debate on the issues
Free-Market Capitalism Is So 20th-Century : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 276 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The recession of 2008 has cast serious doubt on whether free-market capitalism, an idea set that functioned reasonably well in the 20th century, is a healthy economic ideology to carry over into the 21st. Has free-market capitalism become an outdated economic model? That is the question in this Oxford Union-style debate as panelists make their case. Speakers for the motion argue that capitalism has been empirically proven wrong due to its failure to warn of impending crisis and that 'state capitalism, ' as it is evolving in Saudi Arabia, China, and Russia, is the model for the immediate future; those against identify contributory factors--for example, a lack of adequate competition that enabled core institutions to grow too big to be allowed to fail--as the agents of capitalist catastrophe and point to the systems used in Scandinavia as exemplary models of free-market capitalism. Questions from the floor follow. The final vote? Significantly against. Political satirist Rory Bremner presides."--Container
The United Nations is terminally paralyzed : debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As a peacekeeper, the UN has had dubious results. It did nothing for Darfur. Its 17,000 blue helmets have failed to stop the violence in North Kivu. And it never reached a resolution on whether to intervene in Myanmar. Is the United Nations terminally paralyzed-and does the democratic world need a new forum of its own? That is the two-part question in this Oxford Union-style debate as panelists make their case. Speakers for the motion call attention to repeated deadlocks in the Security Council as an obstacle to resolutions on humanitarian crises and extol the potential benefits of a league of democracies; those against emphasize that the UN is the only universally acknowledged seat of collective legitimacy and justice and express concern over the potentially ostracizing and polarizing effects of a "club of democracies" in a world with cross-cultural problems. Questions from the floor follow. The final vote? Significantly against. BBC World News anchor Zeinab Badawi presides
The World Would Be Better Off Without Religion : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the words of Blaise Pascal, the 17th-century, French mathematician and Christian philosopher, "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction." Does religion breed intolerance, violence, and ignorance? Or does it promote peace, morality, and ethical behavior? Has religion been more a source for good or evil in human history?
Big Government Is Stifling the American Spirit : A Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 267 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is big government stifling the American spirit? Just about everyone has a reason to question how the size of our government affects the nation's economic and political structure. Is government intervention in everything from financial policy to health care rewarding the "takers" and not the "makers," stifling innovators, entrepreneurs, and business owners? Or has government done too little to support the growing poor and rapidly shrinking middle class?
Death Is Not Final : A Debate( Visual )

5 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

If consciousness is just the workings of neurons and synapses, how do we explain the phenomenon of "near-death experience"? By some accounts, about 3 percent of the U.S. population has had one: an out-of-body experience often characterized by remarkable visions and feelings of peace and joy, all while the physical body is close to death. To skeptics, there are more plausible, natural explanations, like oxygen deprivation. Is the prospect of an existence after death real, or a construct of wishful thinking about our own mortality?
Income Inequality Impairs the American Dream of Upward Mobility : a Debate( Visual )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1 percent have grown by 154 percent, while the wages of the bottom 90 percent have grown by only 17 percent. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further apart, some argue that opportunities to achieve the American dream of upward mobility could disappear, they assert, as the rich grow richer and the wages of the middle class and the poor hardly grow at all. But others consider income inequality a positive development-a feature of a dynamic and robust economy-that, in the end, helps everyone. And income inequality, they add, is irrelevant to upward mobility, which, they note, has remained stable over the past few decades. Is rising income inequality a growing problem that threatens the American dream? Or is it a misleading metric for gauging upward mobility and a sign of the nation's economic health?
Legalize Assisted Suicide : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1994, Oregon voters passed the Death with Dignity Act, which legalized physician-assisted suicide for people with terminal illnesses. Since then, more states have passed such laws, and others are considering them. Is physician-assisted suicide, as the American Medical Association's code of ethics states, "fundamentally incompatible with the physician's role as healer?" Will such laws lead to a slippery slope, where human life is devalued and vulnerable people are pressured to choose death? Or do people possess a basic right to autonomy and independence regarding end-of-life decisions that include the right to end pain and suffering, and the right to choose to die with dignity? Should physician-assisted suicide be legal?
We Must Tolerate a Nuclear Iran : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 260 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Iran, one of the most volatile nations in the Middle East and long hostile to the United States, may be developing nuclear weapons. How should the United States deal with this possibility? Should the United States tolerate a nuclear Iran? Rethink your point of view with this Intelligence Squared U.S. Oxford-style debate
The U.S. Should Adopt the "Right to Be Forgotten" Online : a Debate( Visual )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2014, the European Union's Court of Justice ruled that individuals have a right to be forgotten online, "the right-under certain conditions-to ask search engines to remove links with personal information about them." This right is not absolute, however, but meant to be balanced against other fundamental rights, like freedom of expression. In the six months following the court's decision, Google received more than 180,000 removal requests. Of those reviewed and processed, 41% were granted. Largely seen as a victory by Europeans, the reaction among Americans was overwhelmingly negative. Was the Court of Justice's ruling a win for privacy and human dignity, or a blow to free speech and public information? Should the United States adopt the "right to be forgotten" online?
Abolish the Death Penalty : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 259 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many countries across the world have abolished the death penalty, and the United States remains the only English-speaking Western democracy to still allow capital punishment. The issue of whether to execute dangerous criminals is fraught with controversy. Opponents of the death penalty argue that it is immoral, does not deter crime, and is imposed unfairly, inconsistently, and in a flawed manner. Supporters of the death penalty argue that it is indeed moral, does deter crime, and is an appropriate punishment for murderers who have committed heinous crimes. Should the United States abolish the death penalty?
Individuals and Organizations Have a Constitutional Right to Unlimited Spending on Their Own Political Speech : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel? For democracy to work, some argue, citizens-along with corporations, unions, media outlets, and other organizations-must be allowed to spend as much money as they wish to express their views on political candidates and the issues of the day. But others disagree. If every individual and organization can spend as much money as they like to express their views, they argue, the richest people and groups will drown out everyone else. Restrictions on political expression, equalize the political process and prevent the rich from dominating it. Do individuals and organizations have a constitutional right to unlimited spending on their own political speech?
We'd be better off without religion : a debate( Visual )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It has been called a gateway to eternal salvation and an incitement to holy war. It has unified peoples yet divided nations. Religion: would society be better off without it? That is the question in this Oxford Union-style debate as panelists make their case. Speakers for the motion underscore that rampant interfaith and intrafaith violence vastly outweighs any social benefits of religion and that key virtues of religion, such as inspiration and consolation, can readily be found in other aspects of life; those against suggest that religion is inescapable in that faith is an integral part of human nature and that religious moderates-the majority of the planet's faithful-cumulatively do great good in the world. Questions from the floor follow. The final vote? Marginally for. British media personality Joan Bakewell presides
Genetically Modified Food : a Debate( Visual )

4 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 248 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Genetically modified foods have been around for decades. Created by altering the DNA of one organism through the introduction of genes from another, they are mainly found in processed foods that use corn, soybeans, and sugar beets, and in feed given to farm animals that people later consume. Supporters argue that genetic modification can make food more flavorful, nutritious, and abundant and enables plants to fight disease, resist pests, and survive drought. Opponents, however, question the safety of genetically modified foods, contend that their health benefits remain unproven, and fear their long-term impact on the environment, the food industry, and the human body. Is the world better off with or without genetically modified food?
The President Has Exceeded His Constitutional Authority by Waging War without Congressional Authorization : a Debate( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 248 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 2014 and 2015, President Obama launched a heavy, long-term bombing campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. But did he have constitutional authority to do so? The U.S. Constitution carefully divides the war powers of the U.S. government between the legislative and executive branches. Article I states that "Congress shall have Power ... To declare War," but Article II states that "The President shall be Commander in Chief" of the armed forces. Congress never declared war on ISIS but enacted legislation in 2001 authorizing the president to take military action against terrorists linked to the 9/11 attacks. In bombing ISIS, did President Obama exceed his power and violate the Constitution?
Liberals Are Stifling Intellectual Diversity on Campus : a Debate( Visual )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 245 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What is college for? To many, it's a place for personal and intellectual growth, a setting that provides students the opportunity to explore new ideas and philosophies that challenge their beliefs. But is it really? Recent cancellations of politically controversial speakers, rescinded honorary degrees, and scrutiny of certain university groups have raised concerns that liberal intolerance pervades the nation's campuses. Are liberals shutting down speech and stifling intellectual diversity on campus? Or is this simply a myth propagated by conservatives, based on the preponderance of liberals at universities rather than intentionally discriminatory actions?
Amazon Is the Reader's Friend : a Debate( Visual )

3 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 244 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is Amazon good for readers and the book industry? In 2014, Amazon and the publishing house Hachette settled a dispute over who should set the price for e-books. In Amazon's view, lower prices mean more sales and more readers, and that's a boon for business and consumers. But to publishers, the price of an e-book must reflect the costs invested, from the author's advance to the book's production. The conflict raised questions about the value of books, the business practices of Amazon, and the role of publishers in the 21st century. Do cheaper prices benefit readers by providing low-cost books? Or do they hurt readers by shortchanging authors and publishers, potentially putting them out of business? Amazon, which accounts for the sales of 41 percent of all new books and 67 percent of all e-books, is threatening to become a monopoly and upend the publishing industry. But is publishing an old-fashioned enterprise in need of disruption? Is Amazon the reader's friend?
Declinists Be Damned : Bet on America, A Debate( Visual )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 239 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

America owes trillions of dollars to China, the U.S. military often appears powerless to defeat enemies abroad, and the fight against terrorism threatens to undermine civil liberties and privacy rights at home. Washington is paralyzed by bitter partisanship, students are falling behind their international peers in academic skills, and the nation's middle class is no longer the world's most affluent. Is America in decline? The charge isn't new. The Soviets' launch of Sputnik in the 1950s, the energy crisis in the 1970s, and the 9/11 attacks in 2001 all led to cries that America was in trouble-but the nation bounced back. Times might indeed be tough today, but America is recovering from the Great Recession faster than almost any other major country, an energy boom could add billions to the nation's wealth, and the United States still remains a leader in technological innovation and possesses the world's strongest military. But are the declinists right? Are the nation's best days over, or should the world still bet on America?
Flexing America's Muscles in the Middle East Will Make Things Worse : a Debate( Visual )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The disintegration of Iraq, the rise of ISIS, the civil war in Syria, the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, the promise and peril of the Arab Spring ... The Middle East has long vexed the United States and challenged policy makers for generations. What role should America play in the region? For some, the nation's restraint has been a sign of disciplined leadership. But for others, it has been a sign of diminished strength and influence. How should the United States balance the competing demands of national interests, moral obligations, and the maintenance of world order? Should the United States pursue a bolder, more muscular policy in the Middle East? Or should it recognize the limits of military intervention and the danger of unanticipated consequences?
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.18 (from 0.17 for Liberals A ... to 0.20 for Democracy ...)

Alternative Names
Intelligence Squared

IQ2U.S.

Languages
English (60)